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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:郭荣章 大小:IRxFclZP65931KB 下载:H3ySbm9X74062次
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日期:2020-08-10 02:33:19
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "On this Hercules went down again into the house of Hades, but Istayed where I was in case some other of the mighty dead should cometo me. And I should have seen still other of them that are gonebefore, whom I would fain have seen- Theseus and Pirithous gloriouschildren of the gods, but so many thousands of ghosts came round meand uttered such appalling cries, that I was panic stricken lestProserpine should send up from the house of Hades the head of thatawful monster Gorgon. On this I hastened back to my ship and orderedmy men to go on board at once and loose the hawsers; so theyembarked and took their places, whereon the ship went down thestream of the river Oceanus. We had to row at first, but presently afair wind sprang up.
2.  "Papa dear, could you manage to let me have a good big waggon? Iwant to take all our dirty clothes to the river and wash them. You arethe chief man here, so it is only right that you should have a cleanshirt when you attend meetings of the council. Moreover, you have fivesons at home, two of them married, while the other three aregood-looking bachelors; you know they always like to have cleanlinen when they go to a dance, and I have been thinking about allthis."
3.  The swineherd went back when he heard this, and Penelope said as shesaw him cross the threshold, "Why do you not bring him here,Eumaeus? Is he afraid that some one will ill-treat him, or is he shyof coming inside the house at all? Beggars should not be shamefaced."
4.  Ulysses answered, "Then you must have been a very little fellow,Eumaeus, when you were taken so far away from your home and parents.Tell me, and tell me true, was the city in which your father andmother lived sacked and pillaged, or did some enemies carry you offwhen you were alone tending sheep or cattle, ship you off here, andsell you for whatever your master gave them?"
5.  Irus was very angry and answered, "You filthy glutton, you run ontrippingly like an old fish-fag. I have a good mind to lay bothhands about you, and knock your teeth out of your head like so manyboar's tusks. Get ready, therefore, and let these people here stand byand look on. You will never be able to fight one who is so muchyounger than yourself."
6.  When she had thus made an end of praying, she handed the cup toTelemachus and he prayed likewise. By and by, when the outer meatswere roasted and had been taken off the spits, the carvers gaveevery man his portion and they all made an excellent dinner. As soonas they had had enough to eat and drink, Nestor, knight of Gerene,began to speak.

计划指导

1.  "And now, tell me and tell me true. Where have you been wandering,and in what countries have you travelled? Tell us of the peoplesthemselves, and of their cities- who were hostile, savage anduncivilized, and who, on the other hand, hospitable and humane. Tellus also why you are made unhappy on hearing about the return of theArgive Danaans from Troy. The gods arranged all this, and sent themtheir misfortunes in order that future generations might havesomething to sing about. Did you lose some brave kinsman of yourwife's when you were before Troy? a son-in-law or father-in-law- whichare the nearest relations a man has outside his own flesh and blood?or was it some brave and kindly-natured comrade- for a good friendis as dear to a man as his own brother?"
2.  Every one approved of this, and then they went home to bed each inhis own abode. When the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn,appeared, they hurried down to the ship and brought their cauldronswith them. Alcinous went on board and saw everything so securelystowed under the ship's benches that nothing could break adrift andinjure the rowers. Then they went to the house of Alcinous to getdinner, and he sacrificed a bull for them in honour of Jove who is thelord of all. They set the steaks to grill and made an excellentdinner, after which the inspired bard, Demodocus, who was afavourite with every one, sang to them; but Ulysses kept on turninghis eyes towards the sun, as though to hasten his setting, for hewas longing to be on his way. As one who has been all day ploughinga fallow field with a couple of oxen keeps thinking about his supperand is glad when night comes that he may go and get it, for it isall his legs can do to carry him, even so did Ulysses rejoice when thesun went down, and he at once said to the Phaecians, addressinghimself more particularly to King Alcinous:
3.  They all held their peace till at last Agelaus son of Damastor said,"No one should take offence at what has just been said, nor gainsayit, for it is quite reasonable. Leave off, therefore, ill-treating thestranger, or any one else of the servants who are about the house; Iwould say, however, a friendly word to Telemachus and his mother,which I trust may commend itself to both. 'As long,' I would say,'as you had ground for hoping that Ulysses would one day come home, noone could complain of your waiting and suffering the suitors to bein your house. It would have been better that he should have returned,but it is now sufficiently clear that he will never do so; thereforetalk all this quietly over with your mother, and tell her to marry thebest man, and the one who makes her the most advantageous offer.Thus you will yourself be able to manage your own inheritance, andto eat and drink in peace, while your mother will look after someother man's house, not yours."'
4.  "As we two sat weeping and talking thus sadly with one another theghost of Achilles came up to us with Patroclus, Antilochus, and Ajaxwho was the finest and goodliest man of all the Danaans after theson of Peleus. The fleet descendant of Aeacus knew me and spokepiteously, saying, 'Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, what deed of daringwill you undertake next, that you venture down to the house of Hadesamong us silly dead, who are but the ghosts of them that can labour nomore?'
5.  But Ulysses did not know what to think. "Alas," he said to himselfin his dismay, "this is only some one or other of the gods who isluring me to ruin by advising me to will quit my raft. At any rate Iwill not do so at present, for the land where she said I should bequit of all troubles seemed to be still a good way off. I know whatI will do- I am sure it will be best- no matter what happens I willstick to the raft as long as her timbers hold together, but when thesea breaks her up I will swim for it; I do not see how I can do anybetter than this."
6.  When earth-encircling Neptune heard this he went to Scheria wherethe Phaecians live, and stayed there till the ship, which was makingrapid way, had got close-in. Then he went up to it, turned it intostone, and drove it down with the flat of his hand so as to root it inthe ground. After this he went away.

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1.  Penelope answered, "My son, I am so lost in astonishment that Ican find no words in which either to ask questions or to answerthem. I cannot even look him straight in the face. Still, if he reallyis Ulysses come back to his own home again, we shall get to understandone another better by and by, for there are tokens with which we twoare alone acquainted, and which are hidden from all others."
2.  As he thus prayed, Minerva came close up to him in the likenessand with the voice of Mentor. "Telemachus," said she, "if you are madeof the same stuff as your father you will be neither fool nor cowardhenceforward, for Ulysses never broke his word nor left his workhalf done. If, then, you take after him, your voyage will not befruitless, but unless you have the blood of Ulysses and of Penelope inyour veins I see no likelihood of your succeeding. Sons are seldomas good men as their fathers; they are generally worse, not better;still, as you are not going to be either fool or cowardhenceforward, and are not entirely without some share of your father'swise discernment, I look with hope upon your undertaking. But mind younever make common cause with any of those foolish suitors, for theyhave neither sense nor virtue, and give no thought to death and to thedoom that will shortly fall on one and all of them, so that they shallperish on the same day. As for your voyage, it shall not be longdelayed; your father was such an old friend of mine that I will findyou a ship, and will come with you myself. Now, however, returnhome, and go about among the suitors; begin getting provisions readyfor your voyage; see everything well stowed, the wine in jars, and thebarley meal, which is the staff of life, in leathern bags, while Igo round the town and beat up volunteers at once. There are many shipsin Ithaca both old and new; I will run my eye over them for you andwill choose the best; we will get her ready and will put out to seawithout delay."
3.  Thus he chided with his heart, and checked it into endurance, but hetossed about as one who turns a paunch full of blood and fat infront of a hot fire, doing it first on one side and then on the other,that he may get it cooked as soon as possible, even so did he turnhimself about from side to side, thinking all the time how, singlehanded as he was, he should contrive to kill so large a body of men asthe wicked suitors. But by and by Minerva came down from heaven in thelikeness of a woman, and hovered over his head saying, "My poorunhappy man, why do you lie awake in this way? This is your house:your wife is safe inside it, and so is your son who is just such ayoung man as any father may be proud of."
4.  "Goddess," replied Ulysses, "do not be angry with me about this. Iam quite aware that my wife Penelope is nothing like so tall or sobeautiful as yourself. She is only a woman, whereas you are animmortal. Nevertheless, I want to get home, and can think of nothingelse. If some god wrecks me when I am on the sea, I will bear it andmake the best of it. I have had infinite trouble both by land andsea already, so let this go with the rest."
5.   "Very well," replied Telemachus, "go home when you have had yourdinner, and in the morning come here with the victims we are tosacrifice for the day. Leave the rest to heaven and me."
6.  Calypso smiled at this and caressed him with her hand: "You know agreat deal," said she, "but you are quite wrong here. May heaven aboveand earth below be my witnesses, with the waters of the river Styx-and this is the most solemn oath which a blessed god can take- thatI mean you no sort of harm, and am only advising you to do exactlywhat I should do myself in your place. I am dealing with you quitestraightforwardly; my heart is not made of iron, and I am very sorryfor you."

应用

1.  BOOK X.
2.  "Madam;" answered Ulysses, "who on the face of the whole earth candare to chide with you? Your fame reaches the firmament of heavenitself; you are like some blameless king, who upholds righteousness,as the monarch over a great and valiant nation: the earth yields itswheat and barley, the trees are loaded with fruit, the ewes bringforth lambs, and the sea abounds with fish by reason of his virtues,and his people do good deeds under him. Nevertheless, as I sit here inyour house, ask me some other question and do not seek to know my raceand family, or you will recall memories that will yet more increase mysorrow. I am full of heaviness, but I ought not to sit weeping andwailing in another person's house, nor is it well to be thusgrieving continually. I shall have one of the servants or evenyourself complaining of me, and saying that my eyes swim with tearsbecause I am heavy with wine."
3.  They did as they were told, and set food before Ulysses, who ate anddrank ravenously, for it was long since he had had food of any kind.Meanwhile, Nausicaa bethought her of another matter. She got the linenfolded and placed in the waggon, she then yoked the mules, and, as shetook her seat, she called Ulysses:
4、  Thus did he speak, and his words pleased them well, so they roseforthwith and went to the house of Ulysses where they took theiraccustomed seats.
5、  "When I had nearly got back to the ship some god took pity upon mysolitude, and sent a fine antlered stag right into the middle of mypath. He was coming down his pasture in the forest to drink of theriver, for the heat of the sun drove him, and as he passed I struckhim in the middle of the back; the bronze point of the spear wentclean through him, and he lay groaning in the dust until the life wentout of him. Then I set my foot upon him, drew my spear from the wound,and laid it down; I also gathered rough grass and rushes and twistedthem into a fathom or so of good stout rope, with which I bound thefour feet of the noble creature together; having so done I hung himround my neck and walked back to the ship leaning upon my spear, forthe stag was much too big for me to be able to carry him on myshoulder, steadying him with one hand. As I threw him down in front ofthe ship, I called the men and spoke cheeringly man by man to eachof them. 'Look here my friends,' said I, 'we are not going to die somuch before our time after all, and at any rate we will not starveso long as we have got something to eat and drink on board.' On thisthey uncovered their heads upon the sea shore and admired the stag,for he was indeed a splendid fellow. Then, when they had feasted theireyes upon him sufficiently, they washed their hands and began tocook him for dinner.

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  • 郭秀云 08-09

      "As soon as I got down to my ship and to the sea shore I rebukedeach one of the men separately, but we could see no way out of it, forthe cows were dead already. And indeed the gods began at once toshow signs and wonders among us, for the hides of the cattle crawledabout, and the joints upon the spits began to low like cows, and themeat, whether cooked or raw, kept on making a noise just as cows do.

  • 胡大敏 08-09

      The rest approved his words, and thereon men servants poured waterover the hands of the guests, while pages filled the mixing-bowls withwine and water and handed it round after giving every man hisdrink-offering. Then, when they had made their offerings and had drunkeach as much as he desired, Ulysses craftily said:

  • 卢卡申科 08-09

       Then Ulysses said, "Sir, it is right that I should say somethingmyself. I am much shocked about what you have said about theinsolent way in which the suitors are behaving in despite of such aman as you are. Tell me, do you submit to such treatment tamely, orhas some god set your people against you? May you not complain of yourbrothers- for it is to these that a man may look for support,however great his quarrel may be? I wish I were as young as you areand in my present mind; if I were son to Ulysses, or, indeed,Ulysses himself, I would rather some one came and cut my head off, butI would go to the house and be the bane of every one of these men.If they were too many for me- I being single-handed- I would ratherdie fighting in my own house than see such disgraceful sights dayafter day, strangers grossly maltreated, and men dragging the womenservants about the house in an unseemly way, wine drawn recklessly,and bread wasted all to no purpose for an end that shall never beaccomplished."

  • 老舍 08-09

      "Eurymachus," Penelope answered, "people who persist in eating upthe estate of a great chieftain and dishonouring his house must notexpect others to think well of them. Why then should you mind if mentalk as you think they will? This stranger is strong and well-built,he says moreover that he is of noble birth. Give him the bow, andlet us see whether he can string it or no. I say- and it shallsurely be- that if Apollo vouchsafes him the glory of stringing it,I will give him a cloak and shirt of good wear, with a javelin to keepoff dogs and robbers, and a sharp sword. I will also give him sandals,and will see him sent safely whereever he wants to go."

  • 张信宇 08-08

    {  And Jove answered, "What, O Lord of the Earthquake, are youtalking about? The gods are by no means wanting in respect for you. Itwould be monstrous were they to insult one so old and honoured asyou are. As regards mortals, however, if any of them is indulging ininsolence and treating you disrespectfully, it will always rest withyourself to deal with him as you may think proper, so do just as youplease."

  • 熊丙奇 08-07

      "I understand and heed you," replied Eumaeus; "you need instructme no further, only I am going that way say whether I had not betterlet poor Laertes know that you are returned. He used to superintendthe work on his farm in spite of his bitter sorrow about Ulysses,and he would eat and drink at will along with his servants; but theytell me that from the day on which you set out for Pylos he hasneither eaten nor drunk as he ought to do, nor does he look afterhis farm, but sits weeping and wasting the flesh from off his bones."}

  • 塞尔吉奥·马尔奇奥尼 08-07

      Ulysses smiled at this, and said to Telemachus, "Let your mother putme to any proof she likes; she will make up her mind about itpresently. She rejects me for the moment and believes me to besomebody else, because I am covered with dirt and have such badclothes on; let us, however, consider what we had better do next. Whenone man has killed another, even though he was not one who would leavemany friends to take up his quarrel, the man who has killed him muststill say good bye to his friends and fly the country; whereas we havebeen killing the stay of a whole town, and all the picked youth ofIthaca. I would have you consider this matter."

  • 余成群 08-07

      "Alas," said he to himself, "what kind of people have I comeamongst? Are they cruel, savage, and uncivilized, or hospitable andhumane? I seem to hear the voices of young women, and they soundlike those of the nymphs that haunt mountain tops, or springs ofrivers and meadows of green grass. At any rate I am among a race ofmen and women. Let me try if I cannot manage to get a look at them."

  • 薛阳 08-06

       "'Ulysses,' said I, 'this cold will be the death of me, for I haveno cloak; some god fooled me into setting off with nothing on but myshirt, and I do not know what to do.'

  • 高振发 08-04

    {  "Aeolus entertained me for a whole month asking me questions all thetime about Troy, the Argive fleet, and the return of the Achaeans. Itold him exactly how everything had happened, and when I said I mustgo, and asked him to further me on my way, he made no sort ofdifficulty, but set about doing so at once. Moreover, he flayed me aprime ox-hide to hold the ways of the roaring winds, which he shutup in the hide as in a sack- for Jove had made him captain over thewinds, and he could stir or still each one of them according to hisown pleasure. He put the sack in the ship and bound the mouth sotightly with a silver thread that not even a breath of a side-windcould blow from any quarter. The West wind which was fair for us didhe alone let blow as it chose; but it all came to nothing, for we werelost through our own folly.

  • 余承昭 08-04

      Telemachus was the first to speak. "So you have got back,Eumaeus," said he. "What is the news of the town? Have the suitorsreturned, or are they still waiting over yonder, to take me on myway home?"

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