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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:雷小龙 大小:TtbwQSUU59647KB 下载:wv9wAlCX47579次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:82jJjrBE93454条
日期:2020-08-08 05:14:21
安卓
邹雪白

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  THE SIXT DAY, THE SECOND NOVELL
2.  To cheare my long dismay:
3.  And Egges laide in mine owne Hennes nest,
4.  Learne Lovers, learne, what tis to be unjust,
5.  Now although Titus was confounded with shame, to yeeld consent, thatSophronia should be accepted as his wife, and used many obstinateresistances: yet notwithstanding, Love pleading on the one sidepowerfully, and Gisippus as earnestly perswading on the other, thus heanswered. Gisippus, I know not what to say, neither how to behave myselfe in this election, concerning the fitting of mine contentment, orpleasing thee in thy importunate perswasion. But seeing thy liberalityis so great, as it surmounteth all reason or shame in me, I will yeeldobedience to thy more then noble nature. Yet let this remaine forthine assurance, that I doe not receive this grace of thine, as aman not sufficiently understanding, how I enjoy from thee, not onelyher whom most of all I doe affect, but also doe hold my very life ofthee. Grant then you greatest Gods (if you be the Patrones of thismine unexpected felicitie) that with honor and due respect, I mayhereafter make apparantly knowne: how highly I acknowledge this thywonderfull favour, in being more mercifull to me, then I could be tomy selfe.
6.  THE SONG

计划指导

1.  It came to passe, that love over-awed him in such sort, as he fellinto a violent sicknesse, and store of Physicions were sent for, tosave him from death, if possibly it might be. Their judgementsobserving the course of his sicknesse, yet not reaching to the causeof the disease, made a doubtfull question of his recovery; which wasso displeasing to his parents, that their griefe and sorrow grewbeyond measure. Many earnest entreaties they moved to him, to know theoccasion of his sickenesse, whereto he returned no other answere,but heart-breaking sighes, and incessant teares, which drew him moreand more into weakenesse of body.
2.  As shee grew in stature, so she did in beauty and vertuousqualities, as none was more commended throughout the whole City, forfaire, civill, and honest demeanour, which incited many amorously toaffect her. But (above all the rest) two very honest young men, ofgood fame and repute, who were so equally in love addicted to her,that being. jealous of each others fortune, in preventing of theirseverall hopefull expectation; a deadly hatred grew suddenlybetweene them, the one being named Giovanni de Severino, and the otherMenghino de Minghole. Either of these two young men, before theMaide was fifteene yeeres old, laboured to be possessed of her inmarriage, but her Guardian would give no consent thereto: wherefore,perceiving their honest intended meaning to be frustrated, they nowbegan to busie their braines, how to forestall one another by craftand circumvention.
3.  Imprisonment had somwhat mishapen Jehannot in his outward forme, butnot impaired a jot of his noble spirit; much lesse the true love whichhe bare his friend. And although most earnestly he desired thatwhich now Conrado had so frankly offered him, and was in his poweronely to bestow on him; yet could he not cloud any part of hisgreatnes, but with a resolved judgement, thus replied. My Lord,affectation of rule, desire of welthy possessions, or any other matterwhatsoever could never make me a traitor to you or yours; but that Ihave loved, do love, and for ever shal love your beauteous daughter:if that be treason, I do free confesse it, and will die a thousanddeaths before you or any else shall enforce me to deny it, for Ihold her highly worthy of my love. If I have bin more unmannerlywith her then became me, I have committed but that error, whichevermore is so attendant uppon youth; that to deny, is to denieyouth also. And if reverend age would but remember, that once he wasyoung and measure others offences by his owne, they would not bethoght so great, as you (and many more) account them to be, mine beingcommitted as a friend, and not as an enemy. What you make offer ofso willingly, I have alwayes desired; and if I had thought it wouldhave beene granted, long since I had most humbly requested it: andso much the more acceptable would it have bin to me, by how much thefurther off it stood from my hopes. But if you bee so forward asyour words doe witnesse, then feed me not with any furtherfruitlesse expectation; but rather send me backe to prison, and lay asmany afflictions on me as you please. For my endeered love to yourdaughter Spina, maketh mee to love you the more for her sake, howhardly soever you intreat me; and bindeth me in the greaterreverence to you, as being the Father of my fairest friend.
4.  About the Court walked hee numberlesse times, finding such exercisesas he could best devise, to compasse warmth in any manner: no seate orshelter had he any where, either to ease himselfe by sitting downe awhile, or keepe him from the snow, falling continually on him, whichmade him bestow many curses on the Ladies Brother, for his so longtarrying with her, as beleeving him verily to be in the house, or elseshe would (long before) have admitted his entrance, but therein hishope was meerely deceived. It grew now to be about the houre ofmidnight, and Helena had delighted her selfe with her friendextraordinarily, til at last, thus she spake to him. What is thineopinion of my amourous Scholler? Which dost thou imagine to be thegreatest, either his sense and judgement, or the affection I beareto him? Is not this cold sufferance of his, able to quench the violentheat of his loves extremitie, and having so much snow broth to helpeit? Beleeve me (sweet Lady) quoth her friend, as hee is a man, and alearned Scholler, I pitty that he should bee thus ungently dealtwithall: but as he is my rivall and loves enemy, I cannot allow himthe least compassion, resting the more confidently assured of yourlove to me, which I will alwayes esteeme most precious.
5.  The Lady, without any dismay or dread at all, pleasantly thusreplied. My Lord, true it is, that Rinaldo is my Husband, and thathe found me, on the night named, betweene the Armes of Lazarino, wheremany times heeretofore he hath embraced mee, according to themutuall love re-plighted together, which I deny not, nor ever will.But you know well enough, and I am certaine of it, that the Lawesenacted in any Countrey, ought to be common, and made with consentof them whom they concerne, whichin this Edict of yours is quitecontrarie. For it is rigorous against none, but poore women onely, whoare able to yeeld much better content and satisfaction generally, thenremaineth in the power of men to do. And moreover, when this Law wasmade, there was not any woman that gave consent to it, neither werethey called to like or allow thoreof: in which respect, it maydeservedly be termed, an unjust Law. And if you will, in prejudiceof my bodie, and of your owne soule, be the executioner of sounlawfull an Edict, it consisteth in your power to do as you please.
6.  Within a short while after, Nicostratus made a solemne Feastival(accorling as yearely he used to doe) in honour of his birth day,inviting many Lords and Ladies thereto. On which rejoycing day, sosoone as dinner was ended, and the Tables withdrawne: Lydia cameinto the great Hall, where the Feast was solemnly kept; very richand costly apparrelled; and there, in presence of Pyrrhus, and thewhole assemblie, going to the Perch whereon the Faulcone sate, whereinher Husband tooke no little delight, and having untyed her, as if sheemeant to beare her on her Fist: tooke her by the jesses, and beatingher against the wal, killed her. Nicostratus beholding this, calledout aloud unto her, saying. Alas Madame! What have you done? Shemaking him no answere, but turning to the Lords and Ladies, whichhad dined there, spake in this manner.

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1.  Heere you are to observe, that Magdalena (beeing a very beautifullWoman, yong, and in the choisest flower of her time:) had often beforebene solicited by the Duke, to entertaine his love and kindnesse:whereto by no meanes she would listen or give consent. And being nowmost earnestly importuned by her for the safetie of her Sisterslife, hee tooke hold on this her dayly suite to him, and in privatetold her, that if she was so desirous of Ninettaes life: it lay in herpower to obtain it, by granting him the fruition of her love. Sheapparantly perceiving that Ninetta was not likely to live, but bythe prostitution of her chaste honour, which she preferred beforethe losse of her owne life, or her sisters, concluded to let her dye,rather then run into any such disgrace. But having an excellentingenious wit, quicke, and apprehensive in perillous occasions, sheintended now to make a triall of overreaching the lascivious Duke inhis wanton purpose, and yet to be assured of her sisters life, withoutany blemish to her reputation.
2.  As may incite them to lament my wrongs.
3.  No soule so comfortlesse,
4.  Master Chappelet still wept and sighed, and continued silent,notwithstanding all the Confessors comfortable perswasions; butafter hee had helde him a long while in suspence, breathing forth asighe, even as if his very heart would have broken, he saide; HolyFather, seeing you promise to pray to God for me, I will reveale it toyou: Know then, that when I was a little boy, I did once curse myMother; which he had no sooner spoken, but he wrung his hands, andgreeved extraordinarily. Oh good Son, saide the Friar: doth that seemeso great a sinne to thee? Why, men doe daily blaspheme our Lord God,and yet neverthelesse, upon their hearty repentance, he is alwayesready to forgive them; and wilt not thou beleeve to obtaine remission,for a sinne so ignorantly committed? Weepe no more deare Sonne, butcomfort thy selfe and rest resolved, that if thou wert one of them,who nayled our blessed Saviour to his Crosse; yet being so trulyrepentant, as I see thou art, he would freely forgive thee. Say you soFather? quoth Chappelet. What mine owne deare Mother? that bare mein her wombe nine moneths, day and night, and afterwards fed me withher breasts a thousand times, can I be pardoned for cursing her? Ohno, it is too haynous a sinne, and except you pray to God veryinstantly for me, he will not forgive me.
5.   Some perhaps will say, it was a small matter for a King, to giveaway two Damosels in marriage, and I confesse it: but I maintaine itto be great, and more then great, if we say, that a King, being soearnestly enamoured as this King was; should give her away to another,whom he so dearely affected himselfe, without receiving (in recompenceof his affection) so much as a leaffe, flowre, or the least fruit oflove. Yet such was the vertue of this magnificent King, expressed inso highly recompencing the noble Knights courtesie, honouring thetwo daughters so royally, and conquering his owne affections sovertuously.
6.  THE THIRD DAY, THE SEAVENTH NOVELL

应用

1.  Supper being served in to the Table, and hee seated according as theLady commanded; shee began to observe him very considerately; for hewas a goodly man, compleate in all perfection of person, a delicatepleasing countenance, a quicke alluring eye, fixed and constant, notwantonly gadding, in the joviall youthfulnesse of his time, and truesttemper for amorous apprehension; all these were as battering enginesagainst a Bulwarke of no strong resistance, and wrought strangely uponher flexible affections. And though shee fed heartily, as occasionconstrained, yet her thoughts had entertained a new kinde of diet,digested onely by the eye; yet so cunningly concealed, that nomotive to immodesty could be discerned. Her mercy thus extended to himin misery, drew on (by Table discourse) his birth, education, parents,friends, and alies; his wealthy possessions by Merchandize, and asound stability in his estate, but above all (and best of all) thesingle and sole condition of a batcheler; an apt and easie steele tostrike fire, especially upon such quicke taking tinder, and in atime favoured by Fortune.
2.  THE FIFT DAY, THE THIRD NOVELL
3.  Bruno, as heaven knoweth, there is not this day any creature living,for whom I would gladly do more, then for thee, and the very leastword of thy mouth, hath power to commaund mee to goe bare-footed, evenfrom hence so farre as to Peretola, and account my labour wellemployed for thy sake: wherefore, never wonder at my continuallkindnesse towards thee, using thee as my Domesticke companion, andembracing thee as my bosome friend, and therefore I am the bolder inmooving one request unto thee. As thou well knowest, it is no longwhile since, when thou diddest acquaint me with the behaviour of theCorsicane Roving Company, to be one in so rare and excellent aSociety, such hath bin my earnest longing ever since, as day nor nighthave I enjoyed anie rest, but should thinke my felicity beyond allcompare, if I could be entertained in fellowship among you.
4、  THE HARME OF THE DEVISER
5、  If others finde

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网友评论(jstfgpWv65410))

  • 喻军 08-07

      It came to passe, that love over-awed him in such sort, as he fellinto a violent sicknesse, and store of Physicions were sent for, tosave him from death, if possibly it might be. Their judgementsobserving the course of his sicknesse, yet not reaching to the causeof the disease, made a doubtfull question of his recovery; which wasso displeasing to his parents, that their griefe and sorrow grewbeyond measure. Many earnest entreaties they moved to him, to know theoccasion of his sickenesse, whereto he returned no other answere,but heart-breaking sighes, and incessant teares, which drew him moreand more into weakenesse of body.

  • 威勒尔 08-07

      How now Gossip Pietro? answered John, What hast thou done? Thou hastmard all by this unadvised speaking, even when the worke was almostfully finished. It is no matter Gossip (answered Pietro) I can like myMule better without a taile, then to see it set on in such manner.

  • 拉尔夫-劳伦 08-07

       Chorus. My teares do plainly prove,

  • 吕乃明 08-07

      So, stepping on a little further, she found the childes Cradle,and laid her selfe downe by Adriano, thinking shee had gone right toher Husband. Adriano being not yet falne asleepe, feeling the hostessein bed with him: tooke advantage of so faire an occasion offered,and what he did, is no businesse of mine, (as I heard) neither foundthe woman any fault. Matters comming to passe in this strangemanner, and Panuccio fearing, lest sleepe seazing on him, he mightdisgrace the maides reputation: taking his kinde farewell of her, withmany kisses and sweet imbraces: returned againe to his owne Bed, butmeeting with the Cradle in his way, and thinking it stood by thehostes Bed, (as truely it did so at the first) went backe from theCradle, and stept into the hostes Bed indeed, who awaked upon his veryentrance, albeit he slept very soundly before.

  • 安东尼·艾登 08-06

    {  Not long since, there lived in the City of Trevers, an Almaine orGermaine, named Arriguo, who being a poore man, served as a Porter, orburden-bearer for money, when any man pleased to employ him. Andyet, notwithstanding his poore and meane condition, he was generallyreputed, to be of good and sanctified life. In which regard (whetherit were true or no, I know not) it happened, that when he died (atleast as the men of Trevers themselves affirmed) in the very instanthoure of his departing, all the Belles in the great Church of Trevers,(not being pulled by the helpe of any hand) beganne to ring: whichbeing accounted for a miracle, every one saide; that this Arriguohad bene, and was a Saint. And presently all the people of the Cityran to the house where the dead body lay, and carried it (as asanctified body) into the great Church, where people, halt, lame,and blind, or troubled with any other diseases, were brought about it,even as if every one should forth-with be holpen, onely by theirtouching the body.

  • 严俊昌 08-05

      Is, by continuall sight to comfort me:}

  • 张亚平 08-05

      After that the Ladies had a while considered, on the communicationbetweene the two Wives of Sienna, and the falshood in friendship oftheir Husbands: the Queene, who was the last to recount her Novell,without offering injurie to Dioneus, began to speake thus.

  • 张路 08-05

      In the silence of darke night, as she lay afflicted in her bed,oftentimes would she call for Lorenzo, entreating his speedy returningto her: And then againe, as if he had bene present with her, shecheckt and reproved him for his so long absence. One night amongst therest, she being growen almost hopelesse, of ever seeing him againe,having a long while wept and greevously lamented; her senses andfaculties utterly spent and tired, that she could not utter any morecomplaints, she fell into a trance or sleepe; and dreamed, that theghost of Lorenzo appeared unto her, in torne and unbefitting garments,his lookes pale, meager, and staring: and (as she thought) thusspake to her. My deere love Isabella, thou dost nothing but tormentthy selfe, with calling on me, accusing me for overlong tarryingfrom thee: I am come therefore to let thee know, that thou canst notenjoy my company any more, because the very same day when last thousawest me, thy brethren most bloodily murthered me. And acquaintingher with the place where they had buried his mangled body: heestrictly charged her, not to call him at any time afterward, and sovanished away.

  • 邹晶晶 08-04

       FROM PERILL

  • 张新奇 08-02

    {  Not long after, they finding the Citie, and behaviour of thepeople sufficiently pleasing to them; they resolved on theircontinuance heere, entering into a league of love and friendshippewith divers, never regarding, whether they were Gentlemen, or no, ordistinguishing the poore from the rich: but only in being conformeto their complexions, sociable and fit for friendship.

  • 李婉华 08-02

      Thus rode on poore unfortunate Pedro, untill the breake of dayappeared, not finding any meanes to get forth of the Forrest, stillcrying and calling for his fayre friend, riding many timesbackeward, when as hee thought hee rode forward, untill hee becameso weake and faint, what with extreame feare, lowd calling, andcontinuing so long awhile without any sustenance, that the whole daybeing thus spent in vaine, and darke night sodainly come uppon him, hewas not able to hold out any longer.

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