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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:黄球 大小:95PIgUKr91719KB 下载:b1hJcbst66189次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:cXay80FF65070条
日期:2020-08-10 15:42:28
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  And Telemachus answered, "I will tell you truly everything. There isno emnity between me and my people, nor can I complain of brothers, towhom a man may look for support however great his quarrel may be. Jovehas made us a race of only sons. Laertes was the only son ofArceisius, and Ulysses only son of Laertes. I am myself the only sonof Ulysses who left me behind him when he went away, so that I havenever been of any use to him. Hence it comes that my house is in thehands of numberless marauders; for the chiefs from all theneighbouring islands, Dulichium, Same, Zacynthus, as also all theprincipal men of Ithaca itself, are eating up my house under thepretext of paying court to my mother, who will neither say point blankthat she will not marry, nor yet bring matters to an end, so theyare making havoc of my estate, and before long will do so withmyself into the bargain. The issue, however, rests with heaven. But doyou, old friend Eumaeus, go at once and tell Penelope that I am safeand have returned from Pylos. Tell it to herself alone, and thencome back here without letting any one else know, for there are manywho are plotting mischief against me."
2.  Thus did they converse, and meanwhile the ship which had broughtTelemachus and his crew from Pylos had reached the town of Ithaca.When they had come inside the harbour they drew the ship on to theland; their servants came and took their armour from them, and theyleft all the presents at the house of Clytius. Then they sent aservant to tell Penelope that Telemachus had gone into the country,but had sent the ship to the town to prevent her from being alarmedand made unhappy. This servant and Eumaeus happened to meet whenthey were both on the same errand of going to tell Penelope. When theyreached the House, the servant stood up and said to the queen in thepresence of the waiting women, "Your son, Madam, is now returnedfrom Pylos"; but Eumaeus went close up to Penelope, and said privatelythat her son had given bidden him tell her. When he had given hismessage he left the house with its outbuildings and went back to hispigs again.
3.  "These two," continued Ulysses, "will not keep long out of the fray,when the suitors and we join fight in my house. Now, therefore, returnhome early to-morrow morning, and go about among the suitors asbefore. Later on the swineherd will bring me to the city disguisedas a miserable old beggar. If you see them ill-treating me, steel yourheart against my sufferings; even though they drag me feet foremostout of the house, or throw things at me, look on and do nothing beyondgently trying to make them behave more reasonably; but they will notlisten to you, for the day of their reckoning is at hand.Furthermore I say, and lay my saying to your heart, when Minerva shallput it in my mind, I will nod my head to you, and on seeing me do thisyou must collect all the armour that is in the house and hide it inthe strong store room. Make some excuse when the suitors ask you whyyou are removing it; say that you have taken it to be out of the wayof the smoke, inasmuch as it is no longer what it was when Ulysseswent away, but has become soiled and begrimed with soot. Add to thismore particularly that you are afraid Jove may set them on toquarrel over their wine, and that they may do each other some harmwhich may disgrace both banquet and wooing, for the sight of armssometimes tempts people to use them. But leave a sword and a spearapiece for yourself and me, and a couple oxhide shields so that we cansnatch them up at any moment; Jove and Minerva will then soon quietthese people. There is also another matter; if you are indeed my sonand my blood runs in your veins, let no one know that Ulysses iswithin the house- neither Laertes, nor yet the swineherd, nor any ofthe servants, nor even Penelope herself. Let you and me exploit thewomen alone, and let us also make trial of some other of the menservants, to see who is on our side and whose hand is against us."
4.  "Your guest has not disgraced you, Telemachus. I did not miss what Iaimed at, and I was not long in stringing my bow. I am still strong,and not as the suitors twit me with being. Now, however, it is timefor the Achaeans to prepare supper while there is still daylight,and then otherwise to disport themselves with song and dance which arethe crowning ornaments of a banquet."
5.  "On this Thoas son of Andraemon threw off his cloak and set outrunning to the ships, whereon I took the cloak and lay in itcomfortably enough till morning. Would that I were still young andstrong as I was in those days, for then some one of you swineherdswould give me a cloak both out of good will and for the respect due toa brave soldier; but now people look down upon me because my clothesare shabby."
6.  "In the third watch of the night when the stars had shifted theirplaces, Jove raised a great gale of wind that flew a hurricane so thatland and sea were covered with thick clouds, and night sprang forthout of the heavens. When the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn,appeared, we brought the ship to land and drew her into a cave whereinthe sea-nymphs hold their courts and dances, and I called the mentogether in council.

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1.  On this he put the bow down, letting it lean against the door[that led into the house] with the arrow standing against the top ofthe bow. Then he sat down on the seat from which he had risen, andAntinous said:
2.  On this he received Theoclymenus' spear and laid it down on the deckof the ship. He went on board and sat in the stern, biddingTheoclymenus sit beside him; then the men let go the hawsers.Telemachus told them to catch hold of the ropes, and they made allhaste to do so. They set the mast in its socket in the cross plank,raised it and made it fast with the forestays, and they hoistedtheir white sails with sheets of twisted ox hide. Minerva sent thema fair wind that blew fresh and strong to take the ship on hercourse as fast as possible. Thus then they passed by Crouni andChalcis.
3.  And Ulysses answered, "Nurse, you ought not to speak in that way;I am well able to form my own opinion about one and all of them;hold your tongue and leave everything to heaven."
4.  "'You will find the other rocks lie lower, but they are so closetogether that there is not more than a bowshot between them. [Alarge fig tree in full leaf grows upon it], and under it lies thesucking whirlpool of Charybdis. Three times in the day does shevomit forth her waters, and three times she sucks them down again; seethat you be not there when she is sucking, for if you are, Neptunehimself could not save you; you must hug the Scylla side and driveship by as fast as you can, for you had better lose six men thanyour whole crew.'
5.  "Vulcan," said Neptune, "if Mars goes away without paying hisdamages, I will pay you myself." So Vulcan answered, "In this case Icannot and must not refuse you."
6.  "Then I saw Minos son of Jove with his golden sceptre in his handsitting in judgement on the dead, and the ghosts were gathered sittingand standing round him in the spacious house of Hades, to learn hissentences upon them.

推荐功能

1.  Thus did they converse, and presently Mercury came up to them withthe ghosts of the suitors who had been killed by Ulysses. The ghostsof Agamemnon and Achilles were astonished at seeing them, and wentup to them at once. The ghost of Agamemnon recognized Amphimedon sonof Melaneus, who lived in Ithaca and had been his host, so it began totalk to him.
2.  Euryclea did as she was told and closed the doors of the women'sapartments.
3.  "King Alcinous, you said your people were the nimblest dancers inthe world, and indeed they have proved themselves to be so. I wasastonished as I saw them."
4.  To this Penelope said, "My dear sir, of all the guests who everyet came to my house there never was one who spoke in all thingswith such admirable propriety as you do. There happens to be in thehouse a most respectable old woman- the same who received my poor dearhusband in her arms the night he was born, and nursed him ininfancy. She is very feeble now, but she shall wash your feet.""Come here," said she, "Euryclea, and wash your master's age-mate; Isuppose Ulysses' hands and feet are very much the same now as his are,for trouble ages all of us dreadfully fast."
5.   "My dear wife," replied Menelaus, "I see the likeness just as youdo. His hands and feet are just like Ulysses'; so is his hair, withthe shape of his head and the expression of his eyes. Moreover, when Iwas talking about Ulysses, and saying how much he had suffered on myaccount, tears fell from his eyes, and he hid his face in his mantle."
6.  As he spoke he lashed his horses and they started off at fullspeed through the town towards the open country. They swayed theyoke upon their necks and travelled the whole day long till the sunset and darkness was over all the land. Then they reached Pherae,where Diocles lived who was son of Ortilochus, the son of Alpheus.There they passed the night and were treated hospitably. When thechild of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, they again yoked theirhorses and their places in the chariot. They drove out through theinner gateway and under the echoing gatehouse of the outer court. ThenPisistratus lashed his horses on and they flew forward nothingloath; ere long they came to Pylos, and then Telemachus said:

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1.  When they had done this they washed their hands and feet and wentback into the house, for all was now over; and Ulysses said to thedear old nurse Euryclea, "Bring me sulphur, which cleanses allpollution, and fetch fire also that I may burn it, and purify thecloisters. Go, moreover, and tell Penelope to come here with herattendants, and also all the maid servants that are in the house."
2.  The suitors then returned to their singing and dancing until theevening; but when night fell upon their pleasuring they went home tobed each in his own abode. Telemachus's room was high up in a towerthat looked on to the outer court; hither, then, he hied, brooding andfull of thought. A good old woman, Euryclea, daughter of Ops, theson of Pisenor, went before him with a couple of blazing torches.Laertes had bought her with his own money when she was quite young; hegave the worth of twenty oxen for her, and shewed as much respect toher in his household as he did to his own wedded wife, but he didnot take her to his bed for he feared his wife's resentment. She itwas who now lighted Telemachus to his room, and she loved him betterthan any of the other women in the house did, for she had nursed himwhen he was a baby. He opened the door of his bed room and sat downupon the bed; as he took off his shirt he gave it to the good oldwoman, who folded it tidily up, and hung it for him over a peg byhis bed side, after which she went out, pulled the door to by a silvercatch, and drew the bolt home by means of the strap. But Telemachus ashe lay covered with a woollen fleece kept thinking all night throughof his intended voyage of the counsel that Minerva had given him.
3.  Thus did he speak, and his words pleased them well, so they roseforthwith and went to the house of Ulysses where they took theiraccustomed seats.
4、  Thus they spoke, for they thought that he had killed Antinous bymistake, and did not perceive that death was hanging over the headof every one of them. But Ulysses glared at them and said:
5、  The suitors were surprised and angry at what had happened, so theywent outside the great wall that ran round the outer court, and held acouncil near the main entrance. Eurymachus, son of Polybus, was thefirst to speak.

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  • 保利 08-09

      Telemachus answered, "The fault, father, is mine, and mine only; Ileft the store room door open, and they have kept a sharper look outthan I have. Go, Eumaeus, put the door to, and see whether it is oneof the women who is doing this, or whether, as I suspect, it isMelanthius the son of Dolius."

  • 彭继友 08-09

      "'So far so good,' said she, when I had ended my story, 'and now payattention to what I am about to tell you- heaven itself, indeed,will recall it to your recollection. First you will come to the Sirenswho enchant all who come near them. If any one unwarily draws in tooclose and hears the singing of the Sirens, his wife and childrenwill never welcome him home again, for they sit in a green field andwarble him to death with the sweetness of their song. There is a greatheap of dead men's bones lying all around, with the flesh stillrotting off them. Therefore pass these Sirens by, and stop yourmen's ears with wax that none of them may hear; but if you like youcan listen yourself, for you may get the men to bind you as youstand upright on a cross-piece half way up the mast, and they mustlash the rope's ends to the mast itself, that you may have thepleasure of listening. If you beg and pray the men to unloose you,then they must bind you faster.

  • 图木舒克 08-09

       And Eumaeus answered, "Old man, you have told us an excellent story,and have said nothing so far but what is quite satisfactory; for thepresent, therefore, you shall want neither clothing nor anythingelse that a stranger in distress may reasonably expect, butto-morrow morning you have to shake your own old rags about yourbody again, for we have not many spare cloaks nor shirts up here,but every man has only one. When Ulysses' son comes home again he willgive you both cloak and shirt, and send you wherever you may want togo."

  • 李永深 08-09

      On this the day broke, but Ulysses heard the sound of her weeping,and it puzzled him, for it seemed as though she already knew him andwas by his side. Then he gathered up the cloak and the fleeces onwhich he had lain, and set them on a seat in the cloister, but he tookthe bullock's hide out into the open. He lifted up his hands toheaven, and prayed, saying "Father Jove, since you have seen fit tobring me over land and sea to my own home after all the afflictionsyou have laid upon me, give me a sign out of the mouth of some oneor other of those who are now waking within the house, and let me haveanother sign of some kind from outside."

  • 肖名远 08-08

    {  Now Venus was just come in from a visit to her father Jove, andwas about sitting down when Mars came inside the house, an said ashe took her hand in his own, "Let us go to the couch of Vulcan: heis not at home, but is gone off to Lemnos among the Sintians, whosespeech is barbarous."

  • 李灵 08-07

      She said this to try him, but Ulysses was very angry and said,"Wife, I am much displeased at what you have just been saying. Who hasbeen taking my bed from the place in which I left it? He must havefound it a hard task, no matter how skilled a workman he was, unlesssome god came and helped him to shift it. There is no man living,however strong and in his prime, who could move it from its place, forit is a marvellous curiosity which I made with my very own hands.There was a young olive growing within the precincts of the house,in full vigour, and about as thick as a bearing-post. I built myroom round this with strong walls of stone and a roof to cover them,and I made the doors strong and well-fitting. Then I cut off the topboughs of the olive tree and left the stump standing. This I dressedroughly from the root upwards and then worked with carpenter's toolswell and skilfully, straightening my work by drawing a line on thewood, and making it into a bed-prop. I then bored a hole down themiddle, and made it the centre-post of my bed, at which I workedtill I had finished it, inlaying it with gold and silver; after this Istretched a hide of crimson leather from one side of it to theother. So you see I know all about it, and I desire to learn whetherit is still there, or whether any one has been removing it bycutting down the olive tree at its roots."}

  • 高凤彩 08-07

      So saying he made a ship's cable fast to one of the bearing-poststhat supported the roof of the domed room, and secured it all aroundthe building, at a good height, lest any of the women's feet shouldtouch the ground; and as thrushes or doves beat against a net that hasbeen set for them in a thicket just as they were getting to theirnest, and a terrible fate awaits them, even so did the women have toput their heads in nooses one after the other and die mostmiserably. Their feet moved convulsively for a while, but not for verylong.

  • 任丽娜 08-07

      Then Ulysses answered, "Madam, wife of Ulysses, do not disfigureyourself further by grieving thus bitterly for your loss, though I canhardly blame you for doing so. A woman who has loved her husband andborne him children, would naturally be grieved at losing him, eventhough he were a worse man than Ulysses, who they say was like agod. Still, cease your tears and listen to what I can tell I will hidenothing from you, and can say with perfect truth that I have latelyheard of Ulysses as being alive and on his way home; he is among theThesprotians, and is bringing back much valuable treasure that hehas begged from one and another of them; but his ship and all his crewwere lost as they were leaving the Thrinacian island, for Jove and thesun-god were angry with him because his men had slaughtered thesun-god's cattle, and they were all drowned to a man. But Ulyssesstuck to the keel of the ship and was drifted on to the land of thePhaecians, who are near of kin to the immortals, and who treated himas though he had been a god, giving him many presents, and wishingto escort him home safe and sound. In fact Ulysses would have beenhere long ago, had he not thought better to go from land to landgathering wealth; for there is no man living who is so wily as heis; there is no one can compare with him. Pheidon king of theThesprotians told me all this, and he swore to me- makingdrink-offerings in his house as he did so- that the ship was by thewater side and the crew found who would take Ulysses to his owncountry. He sent me off first, for there happened to be aThesprotian ship sailing for the wheat-growing island of Dulichium,but he showed me all treasure Ulysses had got together, and he hadenough lying in the house of king Pheidon to keep his family for tengenerations; but the king said Ulysses had gone to Dodona that hemight learn Jove's mind from the high oak tree, and know whether afterso long an absence he should return to Ithaca openly or in secret.So you may know he is safe and will be here shortly; he is close athand and cannot remain away from home much longer; nevertheless I willconfirm my words with an oath, and call Jove who is the first andmightiest of all gods to witness, as also that hearth of Ulysses towhich I have now come, that all I have spoken shall surely come topass. Ulysses will return in this self same year; with the end of thismoon and the beginning of the next he will be here."

  • 许红英 08-06

       As they were thus talking, a dog that had been lying asleep raisedhis head and pricked up his ears. This was Argos, whom Ulysses hadbred before setting out for Troy, but he had never had any work out ofhim. In the old days he used to be taken out by the young men whenthey went hunting wild goats, or deer, or hares, but now that hismaster was gone he was lying neglected on the heaps of mule and cowdung that lay in front of the stable doors till the men should comeand draw it away to manure the great close; and he was full offleas. As soon as he saw Ulysses standing there, he dropped his earsand wagged his tail, but he could not get close up to his master. WhenUlysses saw the dog on the other side of the yard, dashed a tearfrom his eyes without Eumaeus seeing it, and said:

  • 洛佩斯·罗德里格斯 08-04

    {  THUS did he speak, and they all held their peace throughout thecovered cloister, enthralled by the charm of his story, till presentlyAlcinous began to speak.

  • 柳德米拉 08-04

      "Eurymachus," Penelope answered, "people who persist in eating upthe estate of a great chieftain and dishonouring his house must notexpect others to think well of them. Why then should you mind if mentalk as you think they will? This stranger is strong and well-built,he says moreover that he is of noble birth. Give him the bow, andlet us see whether he can string it or no. I say- and it shallsurely be- that if Apollo vouchsafes him the glory of stringing it,I will give him a cloak and shirt of good wear, with a javelin to keepoff dogs and robbers, and a sharp sword. I will also give him sandals,and will see him sent safely whereever he wants to go."

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