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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:邱伟 大小:ocsPXEb083786KB 下载:Zr9z4DZo21168次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:LpjwsqIt55257条
日期:2020-08-05 10:09:48
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "Fear not, nurse," answered Telemachus, "my scheme is not withoutheaven's sanction; but swear that you will say nothing about allthis to my mother, till I have been away some ten or twelve days,unless she hears of my having gone, and asks you; for I do not wanther to spoil her beauty by crying."
2.  "I hope, sir," said he, "that you will not be offended with what Iam going to say. Singing comes cheap to those who do not pay for it,and all this is done at the cost of one whose bones lie rotting insome wilderness or grinding to powder in the surf. If these men wereto see my father come back to Ithaca they would pray for longer legsrather than a longer purse, for money would not serve them; but he,alas, has fallen on an ill fate, and even when people do sometimes saythat he is coming, we no longer heed them; we shall never see himagain. And now, sir, tell me and tell me true, who you are and whereyou come from. Tell me of your town and parents, what manner of shipyou came in, how your crew brought you to Ithaca, and of what nationthey declared themselves to be- for you cannot have come by land. Tellme also truly, for I want to know, are you a stranger to this house,or have you been here in my father's time? In the old days we had manyvisitors for my father went about much himself."
3.  AND NOW, as Dawn rose from her couch beside Tithonus- harbinger oflight alike to mortals and immortals- the gods met in council and withthem, Jove the lord of thunder, who is their king. Thereon Minervabegan to tell them of the many sufferings of Ulysses, for she pitiedhim away there in the house of the nymph Calypso.
4.  As he spoke he lashed his horses and they started off at fullspeed through the town towards the open country. They swayed theyoke upon their necks and travelled the whole day long till the sunset and darkness was over all the land. Then they reached Pherae,where Diocles lived who was son of Ortilochus, the son of Alpheus.There they passed the night and were treated hospitably. When thechild of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, they again yoked theirhorses and their places in the chariot. They drove out through theinner gateway and under the echoing gatehouse of the outer court. ThenPisistratus lashed his horses on and they flew forward nothingloath; ere long they came to Pylos, and then Telemachus said:
5.  "The first I saw was Tyro. She was daughter of Salmoneus and wife ofCretheus the son of Aeolus. She fell in love with the river Enipeuswho is much the most beautiful river in the whole world. Once when shewas taking a walk by his side as usual, Neptune, disguised as herlover, lay with her at the mouth of the river, and a huge blue wavearched itself like a mountain over them to hide both woman and god,whereon he loosed her virgin girdle and laid her in a deep slumber.When the god had accomplished the deed of love, he took her hand inhis own and said, 'Tyro, rejoice in all good will; the embraces of thegods are not fruitless, and you will have fine twins about this timetwelve months. Take great care of them. I am Neptune, so now gohome, but hold your tongue and do not tell any one.'
6.  To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "Stranger, though a stillpoorer man should come here, it would not be right for me to insulthim, for all strangers and beggars are from Jove. You must take whatyou can get and be thankful, for servants live in fear when theyhave young lords for their masters; and this is my misfortune now, forheaven has hindered the return of him who would have been alwaysgood to me and given me something of my own- a house, a piece of land,a good looking wife, and all else that a liberal master allows aservant who has worked hard for him, and whose labour the gods haveprospered as they have mine in the situation which I hold. If mymaster had grown old here he would have done great things by me, buthe is gone, and I wish that Helen's whole race were utterly destroyed,for she has been the death of many a good man. It was this matter thattook my master to Ilius, the land of noble steeds, to fight theTrojans in the cause of kin Agamemnon."

计划指导

1.  "Mother," answered Telemachus, "let the bard sing what he has a mindto; bards do not make the ills they sing of; it is Jove, not they, whomakes them, and who sends weal or woe upon mankind according to hisown good pleasure. This fellow means no harm by singing theill-fated return of the Danaans, for people always applaud thelatest songs most warmly. Make up your mind to it and bear it; Ulyssesis not the only man who never came back from Troy, but many anotherwent down as well as he. Go, then, within the house and busyyourself with your daily duties, your loom, your distaff, and theordering of your servants; for speech is man's matter, and mineabove all others- for it is I who am master here."
2.  She heeded her son's words, washed her face, changed her dress,and vowed full and sufficient hecatombs to all the gods if theywould only vouchsafe her revenge upon the suitors.
3.  "When Circe saw me sitting there without eating, and in great grief,she came to me and said, 'Ulysses, why do you sit like that asthough you were dumb, gnawing at your own heart, and refusing bothmeat and drink? Is it that you are still suspicious? You ought notto be, for I have already sworn solemnly that I will not hurt you.'
4.  Thus did he speak, and they all of them laughed heartily. Eurymachusthen said, "This stranger who has lately come here has lost hissenses. Servants, turn him out into the streets, since he finds itso dark here."
5.  "My poor fellow, you shall not stay here grieving and frettingyour life out any longer. I am going to send you away of my own freewill; so go, cut some beams of wood, and make yourself a large raftwith an upper deck that it may carry you safely over the sea. I willput bread, wine, and water on board to save you from starving. Iwill also give you clothes, and will send you a fair wind to takeyou home, if the gods in heaven so will it- for they know more aboutthese things, and can settle them better than I can."
6.  Minerva answered, "Do not try to keep me, for I would be on my wayat once. As for any present you may be disposed to make me, keep ittill I come again, and I will take it home with me. You shall giveme a very good one, and I will give you one of no less value inreturn."

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1.  "Thence we sailed sadly on till the men were worn out with longand fruitless rowing, for there was no longer any wind to help them.Six days, night and day did we toil, and on the seventh day we reachedthe rocky stronghold of Lamus- Telepylus, the city of theLaestrygonians, where the shepherd who is driving in his sheep andgoats [to be milked] salutes him who is driving out his flock [tofeed] and this last answers the salute. In that country a man whocould do without sleep might earn double wages, one as a herdsman ofcattle, and another as a shepherd, for they work much the same bynight as they do by day.
2.  "He got more and more furious as he heard me, so he tore the topfrom off a high mountain, and flung it just in front of my ship sothat it was within a little of hitting the end of the rudder. Thesea quaked as the rock fell into it, and the wash of the wave itraised carried us back towards the mainland, and forced us towards theshore. But I snatched up a long pole and kept the ship off, makingsigns to my men by nodding my head, that they must row for theirlives, whereon they laid out with a will. When we had got twice as faras we were before, I was for jeering at the Cyclops again, but the menbegged and prayed of me to hold my tongue.
3.  The old woman swore most solemnly that she would not, and when shehad completed her oath, she began drawing off the wine into jars,and getting the barley meal into the bags, while Telemachus wentback to the suitors.
4.  Now there was a trap door on the wall, while at one end of thepavement there was an exit leading to a narrow passage, and thisexit was closed by a well-made door. Ulysses told Philoetius tostand by this door and guard it, for only one person could attack itat a time. But Agelaus shouted out, "Cannot some one go up to the trapdoor and tell the people what is going on? Help would come at once,and we should soon make an end of this man and his shooting."
5.   Ulysses smiled at him and answered, "Fear not; Telemachus hassaved your life, that you may know in future, and tell other people,how greatly better good deeds prosper than evil ones. Go, therefore,outside the cloisters into the outer court, and be out of the way ofthe slaughter- you and the bard- while I finish my work here inside."
6.  Thus they spoke, for they thought that he had killed Antinous bymistake, and did not perceive that death was hanging over the headof every one of them. But Ulysses glared at them and said:

应用

1.  To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "The stranger is quitereasonable. He is avoiding the suitors, and is only doing what any oneelse would do. He asks you to wait till sundown, and it will be muchbetter, madam, that you should have him all to yourself, when youcan hear him and talk to him as you will."
2.  "We soon reached his cave, but he was out shepherding, so we wentinside and took stock of all that we could see. His cheese-rackswere loaded with cheeses, and he had more lambs and kids than his penscould hold. They were kept in separate flocks; first there were thehoggets, then the oldest of the younger lambs and lastly the veryyoung ones all kept apart from one another; as for his dairy, allthe vessels, bowls, and milk pails into which he milked, were swimmingwith whey. When they saw all this, my men begged me to let themfirst steal some cheeses, and make off with them to the ship; theywould then return, drive down the lambs and kids, put them on boardand sail away with them. It would have been indeed better if we haddone so but I would not listen to them, for I wanted to see theowner himself, in the hope that he might give me a present. When,however, we saw him my poor men found him ill to deal with.
3.  On this Telemachus went by torch-light to the other side of theinner court, to the room in which he always slept. There he lay in hisbed till morning, while Ulysses was left in the cloister ponderingon the means whereby with Minerva's help he might be able to killthe suitors.
4、  Thus did they converse, and presently the swineherds came up withthe pigs, which were then shut up for the night in their sties, anda tremendous squealing they made as they were being driven intothem. But Eumaeus called to his men and said, "Bring in the best pigyou have, that I may sacrifice for this stranger, and we will taketoll of him ourselves. We have had trouble enough this long timefeeding pigs, while others reap the fruit of our labour."
5、  With these words he led the way, and the others followed after. Aservant hung Demodocus's lyre on its peg for him, led him out of thecloister, and set him on the same way as that along which all thechief men of the Phaeacians were going to see the sports; a crowd ofseveral thousands of people followed them, and there were manyexcellent competitors for all the prizes. Acroneos, Ocyalus, Elatreus,Nauteus, Prymneus, Anchialus, Eretmeus, Ponteus, Proreus, Thoon,Anabesineus, and Amphialus son of Polyneus son of Tecton. There wasalso Euryalus son of Naubolus, who was like Mars himself, and wasthe best looking man among the Phaecians except Laodamas. Three sonsof Alcinous, Laodamas, Halios, and Clytoneus, competed also.

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  • 李渝 08-04

      When the bright star that heralds the approach of dawn began toshow. the ship drew near to land. Now there is in Ithaca a haven ofthe old merman Phorcys, which lies between two points that break theline of the sea and shut the harbour in. These shelter it from thestorms of wind and sea that rage outside, so that, when once withinit, a ship may lie without being even moored. At the head of thisharbour there is a large olive tree, and at no distance a fineoverarching cavern sacred to the nymphs who are called Naiads. Thereare mixing-bowls within it and wine-jars of stone, and the bees hivethere. Moreover, there are great looms of stone on which the nymphsweave their robes of sea purple- very curious to see- and at all timesthere is water within it. It has two entrances, one facing North bywhich mortals can go down into the cave, while the other comes fromthe South and is more mysterious; mortals cannot possibly get in byit, it is the way taken by the gods.

  • 段启甫 08-04

      "So you are come, Telemachus, light of my eyes that you are. WhenI heard you had gone to Pylos I made sure I was never going to see youany more. Come in, my dear child, and sit down, that I may have a goodlook at you now you are home again; it is not very often you come intothe country to see us herdsmen; you stick pretty close to the towngenerally. I suppose you think it better to keep an eye on what thesuitors are doing."

  • 史蒂夫·纳卡莫 08-04

       "'You will now come to the Thrinacian island, and here you willsee many herds of cattle and flocks of sheep belonging to the sun-god-seven herds of cattle and seven flocks of sheep, with fifty head ineach flock. They do not breed, nor do they become fewer in number, andthey are tended by the goddesses Phaethusa and Lampetie, who arechildren of the sun-god Hyperion by Neaera. Their mother when shehad borne them and had done suckling them sent them to theThrinacian island, which was a long way off, to live there and lookafter their father's flocks and herds. If you leave these flocksunharmed, and think of nothing but getting home, you may yet aftermuch hardship reach Ithaca; but if you harm them, then I forewarnyou of the destruction both of your ship and of your comrades; andeven though you may yourself escape, you will return late, in badplight, after losing all your men.'

  • 杜斌 08-04

      "My dear, will you be so kind as to show me the house of kingAlcinous? I am an unfortunate foreigner in distress, and do not knowone in your town and country."

  • 宾·高 08-03

    {  He then chose twenty men, and they went down to their. ship and tothe sea side; they drew the vessel into the water and got her mast andsails inside her; they bound the oars to the thole-pins with twistedthongs of leather, all in due course, and spread the white sailsaloft, while their fine servants brought them their armour. Thenthey made the ship fast a little way out, came on shore again, gottheir suppers, and waited till night should fall.

  • 周红波 08-02

      Thus did he speak, and they did even as he had said, and yoked thefleet horses to the chariot. The housekeeper packed them up aprovision of bread, wine, and sweetmeats fit for the sons ofprinces. Then Telemachus got into the chariot, while Pisistratusgathered up the reins and took his seat beside him. He lashed thehorses on and they flew forward nothing loth into the open country,leaving the high citadel of Pylos behind them. All that day did theytravel, swaying the yoke upon their necks till the sun went down anddarkness was over all the land. Then they reached Pherae where Diocleslived, who was son to Ortilochus and grandson to Alpheus. Here theypassed the night and Diocles entertained them hospitably. When thechild of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn; appeared, they again yoked theirhorses and drove out through the gateway under the echoinggatehouse. Pisistratus lashed the horses on and they flew forwardnothing loth; presently they came to the corn lands Of the opencountry, and in the course of time completed their journey, so welldid their steeds take them.}

  • 林振传 08-02

      Thus did they converse. Meanwhile Melanthius was again going tothe store room to fetch more armour, but the swineherd saw him andsaid to Ulysses who was beside him, "Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, itis that scoundrel Melanthius, just as we suspected, who is going tothe store room. Say, shall I kill him, if I can get the better of him,or shall I bring him here that you may take your own revenge for allthe many wrongs that he has done in your house?"

  • 甄砚 08-02

      Thus did they converse; meanwhile Melanthius the goatherd came up,for he too was bringing in his best goats for the suitors' dinner; andhe had two shepherds with him. They tied the goats up under thegatehouse, and then Melanthius began gibing at Ulysses. "Are you stillhere, stranger," said he, "to pester people by begging about thehouse? Why can you not go elsewhere? You and I shall not come to anunderstanding before we have given each other a taste of our fists.You beg without any sense of decency: are there not feasts elsewhereamong the Achaeans, as well as here?"

  • 江泽民 08-01

       As he spoke day began to break, and Menelaus, who had already risen,leaving Helen in bed, came towards them. When Telemachus saw him heput on his shirt as fast as he could, threw a great cloak over hisshoulders, and went out to meet him. "Menelaus," said he, "let me goback now to my own country, for I want to get home."

  • 吕志勇 07-30

    {  "Do not scold me, mother,' answered Telemachus, "nor vex me,seeing what a narrow escape I have had, but wash your face, changeyour dress, go upstairs with your maids, and promise full andsufficient hecatombs to all the gods if Jove will only grant us ourrevenge upon the suitors. I must now go to the place of assembly toinvite a stranger who has come back with me from Pylos. I sent himon with my crew, and told Piraeus to take him home and look afterhim till I could come for him myself."

  • 卢同学 07-30

      This made them all very angry, for they feared he might string thebow; Antinous therefore rebuked him fiercely saying, "Wretchedcreature, you have not so much as a grain of sense in your whole body;you ought to think yourself lucky in being allowed to dine unharmedamong your betters, without having any smaller portion served you thanwe others have had, and in being allowed to hear our conversation.No other beggar or stranger has been allowed to hear what we say amongourselves; the wine must have been doing you a mischief, as it doeswith all those drink immoderately. It was wine that inflamed theCentaur Eurytion when he was staying with Peirithous among theLapithae. When the wine had got into his head he went mad and didill deeds about the house of Peirithous; this angered the heroes whowere there assembled, so they rushed at him and cut off his ears andnostrils; then they dragged him through the doorway out of thehouse, so he went away crazed, and bore the burden of his crime,bereft of understanding. Henceforth, therefore, there was warbetween mankind and the centaurs, but he brought it upon himselfthrough his own drunkenness. In like manner I can tell you that itwill go hardly with you if you string the bow: you will find nomercy from any one here, for we shall at once ship you off to kingEchetus, who kills every one that comes near him: you will never getaway alive, so drink and keep quiet without getting into a quarrelwith men younger than yourself."

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