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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:陆玉仁 大小:KcZ9ozOj71888KB 下载:iDo1233R67370次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:7dFoIRF493829条
日期:2020-08-06 19:20:18
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基耶斯洛夫斯基

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "'So far so good,' said she, when I had ended my story, 'and now payattention to what I am about to tell you- heaven itself, indeed,will recall it to your recollection. First you will come to the Sirenswho enchant all who come near them. If any one unwarily draws in tooclose and hears the singing of the Sirens, his wife and childrenwill never welcome him home again, for they sit in a green field andwarble him to death with the sweetness of their song. There is a greatheap of dead men's bones lying all around, with the flesh stillrotting off them. Therefore pass these Sirens by, and stop yourmen's ears with wax that none of them may hear; but if you like youcan listen yourself, for you may get the men to bind you as youstand upright on a cross-piece half way up the mast, and they mustlash the rope's ends to the mast itself, that you may have thepleasure of listening. If you beg and pray the men to unloose you,then they must bind you faster.
2.  "Then Mercury went back to high Olympus passing over the woodedisland; but I fared onward to the house of Circe, and my heart wasclouded with care as I walked along. When I got to the gates I stoodthere and called the goddess, and as soon as she heard me she camedown, opened the door, and asked me to come in; so I followed her-much troubled in my mind. She set me on a richly decorated seat inlaidwith silver, there was a footstool also under my feet, and she mixed amess in a golden goblet for me to drink; but she drugged it, for shemeant me mischief. When she had given it me, and I had drunk itwithout its charming me, she struck she, struck me with her wand.'There now,' she cried, 'be off to the pigsty, and make your lair withthe rest of them.'
3.  "Have we any idea, Antinous, on what day Telemachus returns fromPylos? He has a ship of mine, and I want it, to cross over to Elis:I have twelve brood mares there with yearling mule foals by their sidenot yet broken in, and I want to bring one of them over here and breakhim."
4.  "Eumaeus, I hear footsteps; I suppose one of your men or some one ofyour acquaintance is coming here, for the dogs are fawning urn him andnot barking."
5.  "But the men disobeyed my orders, took to their own devices, andravaged the land of the Egyptians, killing the men, and taking theirwives and children captive. The alarm was soon carried to the city,and when they heard the war cry, the people came out at daybreaktill the plain was filled with horsemen and foot soldiers and with thegleam of armour. Then Jove spread panic among my men, and they wouldno longer face the enemy, for they found themselves surrounded. TheEgyptians killed many of us, and took the rest alive to do forcedlabour for them. Jove, however, put it in my mind to do thus- and Iwish I had died then and there in Egypt instead, for there was muchsorrow in store for me- I took off my helmet and shield and dropped myspear from my hand; then I went straight up to the king's chariot,clasped his knees and kissed them, whereon he spared my life, bademe get into his chariot, and took me weeping to his own home. Manymade at me with their ashen spears and tried to kil me in theirfury, but the king protected me, for he feared the wrath of Jove theprotector of strangers, who punishes those who do evil.
6.  With these words he moved the heart of Penelope. Then Theoclymenussaid to her:

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1.  "Thus, then, did we wait in great fear of mind till morning came,but when the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, themale sheep hurried out to feed, while the ewes remained bleating aboutthe pens waiting to be milked, for their udders were full to bursting;but their master in spite of all his pain felt the backs of all thesheep as they stood upright, without being sharp enough to find outthat the men were underneath their bellies. As the ram was goingout, last of all, heavy with its fleece and with the weight of mycrafty self; Polyphemus laid hold of it and said:
2.  Ulysses frowned on him and said, "My friend, I do you no manner ofharm; people give you a great deal, but I am not jealous. There isroom enough in this doorway for the pair of us, and you need notgrudge me things that are not yours to give. You seem to be justsuch another tramp as myself, but perhaps the gods will give us betterluck by and by. Do not, however, talk too much about fighting or youwill incense me, and old though I am, I shall cover your mouth andchest with blood. I shall have more peace to-morrow if I do, for youwill not come to the house of Ulysses any more."
3.  She heeded her son's words, washed her face, changed her dress,and vowed full and sufficient hecatombs to all the gods if theywould only vouchsafe her revenge upon the suitors.
4.  "Call him here, then," said Penelope, "that I too may hear hisstory. As for the suitors, let them take their pleasure indoors or outas they will, for they have nothing to fret about. Their corn and wineremain unwasted in their houses with none but servants to consumethem, while they keep hanging about our house day after daysacrificing our oxen, sheep, and fat goats for their banquets, andnever giving so much as a thought to the quantity of wine theydrink. No estate can stand such recklessness, for we have now noUlysses to protect us. If he were to come again, he and his sonwould soon have their revenge."
5.  "Stranger, I should like to speak with you briefly about anothermatter. It is indeed nearly bed time- for those, at least, who cansleep in spite of sorrow. As for myself, heaven has given me a life ofsuch unmeasurable woe, that even by day when I am attending to myduties and looking after the servants, I am still weeping andlamenting during the whole time; then, when night comes, and we all ofus go to bed, I lie awake thinking, and my heart comes a prey to themost incessant and cruel tortures. As the dun nightingale, daughter ofPandareus, sings in the early spring from her seat in shadiestcovert hid, and with many a plaintive trill pours out the tale howby mishap she killed her own child Itylus, son of king Zethus, even sodoes my mind toss and turn in its uncertainty whether I ought tostay with my son here, and safeguard my substance, my bondsmen, andthe greatness of my house, out of regard to public opinion and thememory of my late husband, or whether it is not now time for me togo with the best of these suitors who are wooing me and making me suchmagnificent presents. As long as my son was still young, and unable tounderstand, he would not hear of my leaving my husband's house, butnow that he is full grown he begs and prays me to do so, beingincensed at the way in which the suitors are eating up his property.Listen, then, to a dream that I have had and interpret it for me ifyou can. I have twenty geese about the house that eat mash out of atrough, and of which I am exceedingly fond. I dreamed that a greateagle came swooping down from a mountain, and dug his curved beak intothe neck of each of them till he had killed them all. Presently hesoared off into the sky, and left them lying dead about the yard;whereon I wept in my room till all my maids gathered round me, sopiteously was I grieving because the eagle had killed my geese. Thenhe came back again, and perching on a projecting rafter spoke to mewith human voice, and told me to leave off crying. 'Be of goodcourage,' he said, 'daughter of Icarius; this is no dream, but avision of good omen that shall surely come to pass. The geese arethe suitors, and I am no longer an eagle, but your own husband, who amcome back to you, and who will bring these suitors to a disgracefulend.' On this I woke, and when I looked out I saw my geese at thetrough eating their mash as usual."
6.  "Here we entered, but so dark was the night that some god musthave brought us in, for there was nothing whatever to be seen. A thickmist hung all round our ships; the moon was hidden behind a mass ofclouds so that no one could have seen the island if he had lookedfor it, nor were there any breakers to tell us we were close inshore before we found ourselves upon the land itself; when, however,we had beached the ships, we took down the sails, went ashore andcamped upon the beach till daybreak.

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1.  Then Telemachus said, "Eurymachus, and you other suitors, I shallsay no more, and entreat you no further, for the gods and the peopleof Ithaca now know my story. Give me, then, a ship and a crew oftwenty men to take me hither and thither, and I will go to Spartaand to Pylos in quest of my father who has so long been missing.Some one may tell me something, or (and people often hear things inthis way) some heaven-sent message may direct me. If I can hear of himas alive and on his way home I will put up with the waste yousuitors will make for yet another twelve months. If on the otherhand I hear of his death, I will return at once, celebrate his funeralrites with all due pomp, build a barrow to his memory, and make mymother marry again."
2.  "'Sun,' said Jove, 'go on shining upon us gods and upon mankind overthe fruitful earth. I will shiver their ship into little pieces with abolt of white lightning as soon as they get out to sea.'
3.  "Be off, old man," he cried, "from the doorway, or you shall bedragged out neck and heels. Do you not see that they are all giving methe wink, and wanting me to turn you out by force, only I do notlike to do so? Get up then, and go of yourself, or we shall come toblows."
4.  Then they stood on one side and went to tell the girl, while Ulysseswashed himself in the stream and scrubbed the brine from his backand from his broad shoulders. When he had thoroughly washed himself,and had got the brine out of his hair, he anointed himself with oil,and put on the clothes which the girl had given him; Minerva then madehim look taller and stronger than before, she also made the hairgrow thick on the top of his head, and flow down in curls likehyacinth blossoms; she glorified him about the head and shoulders as askilful workman who has studied art of all kinds under Vulcan andMinerva enriches a piece of silver plate by gilding it- and his workis full of beauty. Then he went and sat down a little way off upon thebeach, looking quite young and handsome, and the girl gazed on himwith admiration; then she said to her maids:
5.   "'Cyclops,' said I, 'you should have taken better measure of yourman before eating up his comrades in your cave. You wretch, eat upyour visitors in your own house? You might have known that your sinwould find you out, and now Jove and the other gods have punishedyou.'
6.  Into this harbour, then, they took their ship, for they knew theplace, She had so much way upon her that she ran half her own lengthon to the shore; when, however, they had landed, the first thingthey did was to lift Ulysses with his rug and linen sheet out of theship, and lay him down upon the sand still fast asleep. Then they tookout the presents which Minerva had persuaded the Phaeacians to givehim when he was setting out on his voyage homewards. They put theseall together by the root of the olive tree, away from the road, forfear some passer by might come and steal them before Ulysses awoke;and then they made the best of their way home again.

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1.  When the hounds saw Ulysses they set up a furious barking and flewat him, but Ulysses was cunning enough to sit down and loose hishold of the stick that he had in his hand: still, he would have beentorn by them in his own homestead had not the swineherd dropped his oxhide, rushed full speed through the gate of the yard and driven thedogs off by shouting and throwing stones at them. Then he said toUlysses, "Old man, the dogs were likely to have made short work ofyou, and then you would have got me into trouble. The gods havegiven me quite enough worries without that, for I have lost the bestof masters, and am in continual grief on his account. I have to attendswine for other people to eat, while he, if he yet lives to see thelight of day, is starving in some distant land. But come inside, andwhen you have had your fill of bread and wine, tell me where youcome from, and all about your misfortunes."
2.  The pair went into the outer court as fast as they could, and satdown by Jove's great altar, looking fearfully round, and stillexpecting that they would be killed. Then Ulysses searched the wholecourt carefully over, to see if anyone had managed to hide himself andwas still living, but he found them all lying in the dust andweltering in their blood. They were like fishes which fishermen havenetted out of the sea, and thrown upon the beach to lie gasping forwater till the heat of the sun makes an end of them. Even so werethe suitors lying all huddled up one against the other.
3.  He then took off his armour and gave it to Eumaeus and Philoetius,who went straight on to the house, while he turned off into thevineyard to make trial of his father. As he went down into the greatorchard, he did not see Dolius, nor any of his sons nor of the otherbondsmen, for they were all gathering thorns to make a fence for thevineyard, at the place where the old man had told them; he thereforefound his father alone, hoeing a vine. He had on a dirty old shirt,patched and very shabby; his legs were bound round with thongs ofoxhide to save him from the brambles, and he also wore sleeves ofleather; he had a goat skin cap on his head, and was looking verywoe-begone. When Ulysses saw him so worn, so old and full of sorrow,he stood still under a tall pear tree and began to weep. He doubtedwhether to embrace him, kiss him, and tell him all about his havingcome home, or whether he should first question him and see what hewould say. In the end he deemed it best to be crafty with him, so inthis mind he went up to his father, who was bending down and diggingabout a plant.
4、  So saying he made a ship's cable fast to one of the bearing-poststhat supported the roof of the domed room, and secured it all aroundthe building, at a good height, lest any of the women's feet shouldtouch the ground; and as thrushes or doves beat against a net that hasbeen set for them in a thicket just as they were getting to theirnest, and a terrible fate awaits them, even so did the women have toput their heads in nooses one after the other and die mostmiserably. Their feet moved convulsively for a while, but not for verylong.
5、  Then nurse Euryclea said, "My child, what are you talking about? butyou were all hard of belief and have made up your mind that yourhusband is never coming, although he is in the house and by his ownfire side at this very moment. Besides I can give you another proof;when I was washing him I perceived the scar which the wild boar gavehim, and I wanted to tell you about it, but in his wisdom he would notlet me, and clapped his hands over my mouth; so come with me and Iwill make this bargain with you- if I am deceiving you, you may haveme killed by the most cruel death you can think of."

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  • 严加安 08-05

      "'Cyclops,' said I, 'you should have taken better measure of yourman before eating up his comrades in your cave. You wretch, eat upyour visitors in your own house? You might have known that your sinwould find you out, and now Jove and the other gods have punishedyou.'

  • 曾丽珍 08-05

      'Son-in-law and daughter," replied Autolycus, "call the childthus: I am highly displeased with a large number of people in oneplace and another, both men and women; so name the child 'Ulysses,' orthe child of anger. When he grows up and comes to visit his mother'sfamily on Mount Parnassus, where my possessions lie, I will make him apresent and will send him on his way rejoicing."

  • 陈振祥 08-05

       "I should have done so at once," replied Neptune, "if I were notanxious to avoid anything that might displease you; now, therefore,I should like to wreck the Phaecian ship as it is returning from itsescort. This will stop them from escorting people in future; and Ishould also like to bury their city under a huge mountain."

  • 唐定陵 08-05

      Thus did they converse; but the others, when they had finished theirwork and the feast was ready, left off working, and took each hisproper place on the benches and seats. Then they began eating; byand by old Dolius and his sons left their work and came up, fortheir mother, the Sicel woman who looked after Laertes now that he wasgrowing old, had been to fetch them. When they saw Ulysses and werecertain it was he, they stood there lost in astonishment; butUlysses scolded them good-naturedly and said, "Sit down to yourdinner, old man, and never mind about your surprise; we have beenwanting to begin for some time and have been waiting for you."

  • 谢勋章 08-04

    {  Penelope presently reached the oak threshold of the store room;the carpenter had planed this duly, and had drawn a line on it so asto get it quite straight; he had then set the door posts into it andhung the doors. She loosed the strap from the handle of the door,put in the key, and drove it straight home to shoot back the boltsthat held the doors; these flew open with a noise like a bullbellowing in a meadow, and Penelope stepped upon the raisedplatform, where the chests stood in which the fair linen and clotheswere laid by along with fragrant herbs: reaching thence, she took downthe bow with its bow case from the peg on which it hung. She satdown with it on her knees, weeping bitterly as she took the bow out ofits case, and when her tears had relieved her, she went to thecloister where the suitors were, carrying the bow and the quiver, withthe many deadly arrows that were inside it. Along with her came hermaidens, bearing a chest that contained much iron and bronze which herhusband had won as prizes. When she reached the suitors, she stoodby one of the bearing-posts supporting the roof of the cloister,holding a veil before her face, and with a maid on either side of her.Then she said:

  • 屠光绍 08-03

      Thus did they converse [and guests kept coming to the king'shouse. They brought sheep and wine, while their wives had put up breadfor them to take with them; so they were busy cooking their dinners inthe courts].}

  • 余兴文 08-03

      "Queen Arete," he exclaimed, "daughter of great Rhexenor, in mydistress I humbly pray you, as also your husband and these your guests(whom may heaven prosper with long life and happiness, and may theyleave their possessions to their children, and all the honoursconferred upon them by the state) to help me home to my own country assoon as possible; for I have been long in trouble and away from myfriends."

  • 谭传 08-03

      "As he spoke he dived under the waves, whereon I turned back tothe ships with my companions, and my heart was clouded with care asI went along. When we reached the ships we got supper ready, for nightwas falling, and camped down upon the beach. When the child ofmorning, rosy-fingered Dawn appeared, we drew our ships into thewater, and put our masts and sails within them; then we went onboard ourselves, took our seats on the benches, and smote the grey seawith our oars. I again stationed my ships in the heaven-fed streamof Egypt, and offered hecatombs that were full and sufficient. WhenI had thus appeased heaven's anger, I raised a barrow to the memory ofAgamemnon that his name might live for ever, after which I had a quickpassage home, for the gods sent me a fair wind.

  • 胡宁 08-02

       To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "Old man, you willneither get paid for bringing good news, nor will Ulysses ever comehome; drink you wine in peace, and let us talk about something else.Do not keep on reminding me of all this; it always pains me when anyone speaks about my honoured master. As for your oath we will let italone, but I only wish he may come, as do Penelope, his old fatherLaertes, and his son Telemachus. I am terribly unhappy too aboutthis same boy of his; he was running up fast into manhood, and badefare to be no worse man, face and figure, than his father, but someone, either god or man, has been unsettling his mind, so he has goneoff to Pylos to try and get news of his father, and the suitors arelying in wait for him as he is coming home, in the hope of leaving thehouse of Arceisius without a name in Ithaca. But let us say no moreabout him, and leave him to be taken, or else to escape if the sonof Saturn holds his hand over him to protect him. And now, old man,tell me your own story; tell me also, for I want to know, who youare and where you come from. Tell me of your town and parents, whatmanner of ship you came in, how crew brought you to Ithaca, and fromwhat country they professed to come- for you cannot have come byland."

  • 孙鹏 07-31

    {  Then Pisistratus said, "Menelaus, son of Atreus, you are right inthinking that this young man is Telemachus, but he is very modest, andis ashamed to come here and begin opening up discourse with onewhose conversation is so divinely interesting as your own. Myfather, Nestor, sent me to escort him hither, for he wanted to knowwhether you could give him any counsel or suggestion. A son has alwaystrouble at home when his father has gone away leaving him withoutsupporters; and this is how Telemachus is now placed, for his fatheris absent, and there is no one among his own people to stand by him."

  • 崔楠 07-31

      "Call him here, then," said Penelope, "that I too may hear hisstory. As for the suitors, let them take their pleasure indoors or outas they will, for they have nothing to fret about. Their corn and wineremain unwasted in their houses with none but servants to consumethem, while they keep hanging about our house day after daysacrificing our oxen, sheep, and fat goats for their banquets, andnever giving so much as a thought to the quantity of wine theydrink. No estate can stand such recklessness, for we have now noUlysses to protect us. If he were to come again, he and his sonwould soon have their revenge."

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