0 易球手机在线-APP安装下载

易球手机在线 注册最新版下载

易球手机在线 注册

易球手机在线注册

类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:麦业成 大小:EAPYD76P19310KB 下载:QI0KEEjO78097次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:liUsYSTS88923条
日期:2020-08-04 10:13:40
安卓
廉政灶

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "Old man," answered Ulysses, "she knows already, so you need nottrouble about that." On this he took his seat, and the sons ofDolius gathered round Ulysses to give him greeting and embrace him oneafter the other; then they took their seats in due order near Doliustheir father.
2.  BOOK XVII.
3.  "Hush, my dears, for I want to say something. I believe the gods wholive in heaven have sent this man to the Phaeacians. When I firstsaw him I thought him plain, but now his appearance is like that ofthe gods who dwell in heaven. I should like my future husband to bejust such another as he is, if he would only stay here and not want togo away. However, give him something to eat and drink."
4.  "May heaven," answered Ulysses, "requite to them the wickedness withwhich they deal high-handedly in another man's house without any senseof shame."
5.  Many a plausible tale did Ulysses further tell her, and Penelopewept as she listened, for her heart was melted. As the snow wastesupon the mountain tops when the winds from South East and West havebreathed upon it and thawed it till the rivers run bank full withwater, even so did her cheeks overflow with tears for the husbandwho was all the time sitting by her side. Ulysses felt for her and wasfor her, but he kept his eyes as hard as or iron without lettingthem so much as quiver, so cunningly did he restrain his tears.Then, when she had relieved herself by weeping, she turned to himagain and said: "Now, stranger, I shall put you to the test and seewhether or no you really did entertain my husband and his men, asyou say you did. Tell me, then, how he was dressed, what kind of a manhe was to look at, and so also with his companions."
6.  "Thus through the livelong day to the going down of the sun wefeasted our fill on meat and drink, but when the sun went down andit came on dark, we camped upon the beach. When the child ofmorning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, I bade my men on board andloose the hawsers. Then they took their places and smote the greysea with their oars; so we sailed on with sorrow in our hearts, butglad to have escaped death though we had lost our comrades.

计划指导

1.  "Alas! I shall either be always feeble and of no prowess, or I amtoo young, and have not yet reached my full strength so as to beable to hold my own if any one attacks me. You others, therefore,who are stronger than I, make trial of the bow and get this contestsettled."
2.  But Minerva would not let the suitors for one moment cease theirinsolence, for she wanted Ulysses to become even more bitter againstthem; she therefore set Eurymachus son of Polybus on to gibe at him,which made the others laugh. "Listen to me," said he, "you suitorsof Queen Penelope, that I may speak even as I am minded. It is not fornothing that this man has come to the house of Ulysses; I believethe light has not been coming from the torches, but from his own head-for his hair is all gone, every bit of it."
3.  When Ulysses and Penelope had had their fill of love they felltalking with one another. She told him how much she had had to bear inseeing the house filled with a crowd of wicked suitors who hadkilled so many sheep and oxen on her account, and had drunk so manycasks of wine. Ulysses in his turn told her what he had suffered,and how much trouble he had himself given to other people. He told hereverything, and she was so delighted to listen that she never wentto sleep till he had ended his whole story.
4.  He took an arrow that was lying upon the table- for those whichthe Achaeans were so shortly about to taste were all inside thequiver- he laid it on the centre-piece of the bow, and drew thenotch of the arrow and the string toward him, still seated on hisseat. When he had taken aim he let fly, and his arrow pierced everyone of the handle-holes of the axes from the first onwards till it hadgone right through them, and into the outer courtyard. Then he said toTelemachus:
5.  "My dear, will you be so kind as to show me the house of kingAlcinous? I am an unfortunate foreigner in distress, and do not knowone in your town and country."
6.  "Here Perimedes and Eurylochus held the victims, while I drew mysword and dug the trench a cubit each way. I made a drink-offeringto all the dead, first with honey and milk, then with wine, andthirdly with water, and I sprinkled white barley meal over thewhole, praying earnestly to the poor feckless ghosts, and promisingthem that when I got back to Ithaca I would sacrifice a barrenheifer for them, the best I had, and would load the pyre with goodthings. I also particularly promised that Teiresias should have ablack sheep to himself, the best in all my flocks. When I had prayedsufficiently to the dead, I cut the throats of the two sheep and letthe blood run into the trench, whereon the ghosts came trooping upfrom Erebus- brides, young bachelors, old men worn out with toil,maids who had been crossed in love, and brave men who had beenkilled in battle, with their armour still smirched with blood; theycame from every quarter and flitted round the trench with a strangekind of screaming sound that made me turn pale with fear. When I sawthem coming I told the men to be quick and flay the carcasses of thetwo dead sheep and make burnt offerings of them, and at the sametime to repeat prayers to Hades and to Proserpine; but I sat where Iwas with my sword drawn and would not let the poor feckless ghostscome near the blood till Teiresias should have answered my questions.

推荐功能

1.  "While we were doing all this, Circe, who knew that we had gotback from the house of Hades, dressed herself and came to us as fastas she could; and her maid servants came with her bringing us bread,meat, and wine. Then she stood in the midst of us and said, 'Youhave done a bold thing in going down alive to the house of Hades,and you will have died twice, to other people's once; now, then,stay here for the rest of the day, feast your fill, and go on withyour voyage at daybreak tomorrow morning. In the meantime I willtell Ulysses about your course, and will explain everything to himso as to prevent your suffering from misadventure either by land orsea.'
2.  Then the old woman took the cauldron in which she was going towash his feet, and poured plenty of cold water into it, adding hottill the bath was warm enough. Ulysses sat by the fire, but ere longhe turned away from the light, for it occurred to him that when theold woman had hold of his leg she would recognize a certain scar whichit bore, whereon the whole truth would come out. And indeed as soon asshe began washing her master, she at once knew the scar as one thathad been given him by a wild boar when he was hunting on MountParnassus with his excellent grandfather Autolycus- who was the mostaccomplished thief and perjurer in the whole world- and with thesons of Autolycus. Mercury himself had endowed him with this gift, forhe used to burn the thigh bones of goats and kids to him, so he tookpleasure in his companionship. It happened once that Autolycus hadgone to Ithaca and had found the child of his daughter just born. Assoon as he had done supper Euryclea set the infant upon his kneesand said, you must find a name for your grandson; you greatly wishedthat you might have one."
3.  To this Nausicaa answered, "Stranger, you appear to be a sensible,well-disposed person. There is no accounting for luck; Jove givesprosperity to rich and poor just as he chooses, so you must takewhat he has seen fit to send you, and make the best of it. Now,however, that you have come to this our country, you shall not wantfor clothes nor for anything else that a foreigner in distress mayreasonably look for. I will show you the way to the town, and willtell you the name of our people; we are called Phaeacians, and I amdaughter to Alcinous, in whom the whole power of the state is vested."
4.  Thus did they converse. Meanwhile the suitors were hatching a plotto murder Telemachus: but a bird flew near them on their left hand- aneagle with a dove in its talons. On this Amphinomus said, "My friends,this plot of ours to murder Telemachus will not succeed; let us goto dinner instead."
5.   "Their hearts sank as they heard me, for they remembered how theyhad been treated by the Laestrygonian Antiphates, and by the savageogre Polyphemus. They wept bitterly in their dismay, but there wasnothing to be got by crying, so I divided them into two companiesand set a captain over each; I gave one company to Eurylochus, while Itook command of the other myself. Then we cast lots in a helmet, andthe lot fell upon Eurylochus; so he set out with his twenty-two men,and they wept, as also did we who were left behind.
6.  Thus did they converse, and meanwhile the ship which had broughtTelemachus and his crew from Pylos had reached the town of Ithaca.When they had come inside the harbour they drew the ship on to theland; their servants came and took their armour from them, and theyleft all the presents at the house of Clytius. Then they sent aservant to tell Penelope that Telemachus had gone into the country,but had sent the ship to the town to prevent her from being alarmedand made unhappy. This servant and Eumaeus happened to meet whenthey were both on the same errand of going to tell Penelope. When theyreached the House, the servant stood up and said to the queen in thepresence of the waiting women, "Your son, Madam, is now returnedfrom Pylos"; but Eumaeus went close up to Penelope, and said privatelythat her son had given bidden him tell her. When he had given hismessage he left the house with its outbuildings and went back to hispigs again.

应用

1.  "'Be sure, therefore,' continued Agamemnon, 'and not be too friendlyeven with your own wife. Do not tell her all that you know perfectlywell yourself. Tell her a part only, and keep your own counsel aboutthe rest. Not that your wife, Ulysses, is likely to murder you, forPenelope is a very admirable woman, and has an excellent nature. Weleft her a young bride with an infant at her breast when we set outfor Troy. This child no doubt is now grown up happily to man's estate,and he and his father will have a joyful meeting and embrace oneanother as it is right they should do, whereas my wicked wife didnot even allow me the happiness of looking upon my son, but killedme ere I could do so. Furthermore I say- and lay my saying to yourheart- do not tell people when you are bringing your ship to Ithaca,but steal a march upon them, for after all this there is no trustingwomen. But now tell me, and tell me true, can you give me any newsof my son Orestes? Is he in Orchomenus, or at Pylos, or is he atSparta with Menelaus- for I presume that he is still living.'
2.  Then Penelope sprang up from her couch, threw her arms roundEuryclea, and wept for joy. "But my dear nurse," said she, "explainthis to me; if he has really come home as you say, how did he manageto overcome the wicked suitors single handed, seeing what a numberof them there always were?"
3.  Thus did the chiefs and rulers of the Phaecians to king Neptune,standing round his altar; and at the same time Ulysses woke up oncemore upon his own soil. He had been so long away that he did notknow it again; moreover, Jove's daughter Minerva had made it a foggyday, so that people might not know of his having come, and that shemight tell him everything without either his wife or his fellowcitizens and friends recognizing him until he had taken his revengeupon the wicked suitors. Everything, therefore, seemed quite differentto him- the long straight tracks, the harbours, the precipices, andthe goodly trees, appeared all changed as he started up and lookedupon his native land. So he smote his thighs with the flat of hishands and cried aloud despairingly.
4、  "I spoke as movingly as I could, but they said nothing, till theirfather answered, 'Vilest of mankind, get you gone at once out of theisland; him whom heaven hates will I in no wise help. Be off, foryou come here as one abhorred of heaven. "And with these words he sentme sorrowing from his door.
5、  "Then I saw Minos son of Jove with his golden sceptre in his handsitting in judgement on the dead, and the ghosts were gathered sittingand standing round him in the spacious house of Hades, to learn hissentences upon them.

旧版特色

!

网友评论(zC6UfV9v62800))

  • 苏伟 08-03

      Thus did he urge the swineherd; Eumaeus, therefore, took hissandals, bound them to his feet, and started for the town. Minervawatched him well off the station, and then came up to it in the formof a woman- fair, stately, and wise. She stood against the side of theentry, and revealed herself to Ulysses, but Telemachus could not seeher, and knew not that she was there, for the gods do not letthemselves be seen by everybody. Ulysses saw her, and so did the dogs,for they did not bark, but went scared and whining off to the otherside of the yards. She nodded her head and motioned to Ulysses withher eyebrows; whereon he left the hut and stood before her outside themain wall of the yards. Then she said to him:

  • 周长文 08-03

      "The stranger," said Telemachus, "shall show me a light; when peopleeat my bread they must earn it, no matter where they come from."

  • 沈柏南 08-03

       As he spoke he crossed the threshold, and Alcinous sent a man toconduct him to his ship and to the sea shore. Arete also sent somemaid servants with him- one with a clean shirt and cloak, another tocarry his strong-box, and a third with corn and wine. When they got tothe water side the crew took these things and put them on board,with all the meat and drink; but for Ulysses they spread a rug and alinen sheet on deck that he might sleep soundly in the stern of theship. Then he too went on board and lay down without a word, but thecrew took every man his place and loosed the hawser from the piercedstone to which it had been bound. Thereon, when they began rowingout to sea, Ulysses fell into a deep, sweet, and almost deathlikeslumber.

  • 骆启德 08-03

      "Take my advice then, and do not go travelling about for long so farfrom home, nor leave your property with such dangerous people inyour house; they will eat up everything you have among them, and youwill have been on a fool's errand. Still, I should advise you by allmeans to go and visit Menelaus, who has lately come off a voyage amongsuch distant peoples as no man could ever hope to get back from,when the winds had once carried him so far out of his reckoning;even birds cannot fly the distance in a twelvemonth, so vast andterrible are the seas that they must cross. Go to him, therefore, bysea, and take your own men with you; or if you would rather travelby land you can have a chariot, you can have horses, and here are mysons who can escort you to Lacedaemon where Menelaus lives. Beg of himto speak the truth, and he will tell you no lies, for he is anexcellent person."

  • 李心如 08-02

    {  When the hounds saw Ulysses they set up a furious barking and flewat him, but Ulysses was cunning enough to sit down and loose hishold of the stick that he had in his hand: still, he would have beentorn by them in his own homestead had not the swineherd dropped his oxhide, rushed full speed through the gate of the yard and driven thedogs off by shouting and throwing stones at them. Then he said toUlysses, "Old man, the dogs were likely to have made short work ofyou, and then you would have got me into trouble. The gods havegiven me quite enough worries without that, for I have lost the bestof masters, and am in continual grief on his account. I have to attendswine for other people to eat, while he, if he yet lives to see thelight of day, is starving in some distant land. But come inside, andwhen you have had your fill of bread and wine, tell me where youcome from, and all about your misfortunes."

  • 高球 08-01

      To this Penelope replied, "Eurymachus, heaven robbed me of all mybeauty whether of face or figure when the Argives set sail for Troyand my dear husband with them. If he were to return and look aftermy affairs, I should both be more respected and show a better presenceto the world. As it is, I am oppressed with care, and with theafflictions which heaven has seen fit to heap upon me. My husbandforesaw it all, and when he was leaving home he took my right wrist inhis hand- 'Wife, 'he said, 'we shall not all of us come safe homefrom Troy, for the Trojans fight well both with bow and spear. Theyare excellent also at fighting from chariots, and nothing decidesthe issue of a fight sooner than this. I know not, therefore,whether heaven will send me back to you, or whether I may not fallover there at Troy. In the meantime do you look after things here.Take care of my father and mother as at present, and even more soduring my absence, but when you see our son growing a beard, thenmarry whom you will, and leave this your present home. This is what hesaid and now it is all coming true. A night will come when I shallhave to yield myself to a marriage which I detest, for Jove hastaken from me all hope of happiness. This further grief, moreover,cuts me to the very heart. You suitors are not wooing me after thecustom of my country. When men are courting a woman who they thinkwill be a good wife to them and who is of noble birth, and when theyare each trying to win her for himself, they usually bring oxen andsheep to feast the friends of the lady, and they make hermagnificent presents, instead of eating up other people's propertywithout paying for it."}

  • 李代沫 08-01

      With this he left them to come on at their leisure, while he wentquickly forward and soon reached the house of his master. When hegot there he went in and took his seat among the suitors oppositeEurymachus, who liked him better than any of the others. Theservants brought him a portion of meat, and an upper woman servant setbread before him that he might eat. Presently Ulysses and theswineherd came up to the house and stood by it, amid a sound of music,for Phemius was just beginning to sing to the suitors. Then Ulyssestook hold of the swineherd's hand, and said:

  • 练锦鸿 08-01

      "Thus spoke Proteus, and I was broken hearted as I heard him. Isat down upon the sands and wept; I felt as though I could no longerbear to live nor look upon the light of the sun. Presently, when I hadhad my fill of weeping and writhing upon the ground, the old man ofthe sea said, 'Son of Atreus, do not waste any more time in cryingso bitterly; it can do no manner of good; find your way home as fastas ever you can, for Aegisthus be still alive, and even though Oresteshas beforehand with you in kilting him, you may yet come in for hisfuneral.'

  • 范琼燕 07-31

       "'That,' said he, 'I can soon do Any ghost that you let taste of theblood will talk with you like a reasonable being, but if you do notlet them have any blood they will go away again.'

  • 章守法 07-29

    {  BOOK IV.

  • 张进真 07-29

      Ulysses smiled at this, and said to Telemachus, "Let your mother putme to any proof she likes; she will make up her mind about itpresently. She rejects me for the moment and believes me to besomebody else, because I am covered with dirt and have such badclothes on; let us, however, consider what we had better do next. Whenone man has killed another, even though he was not one who would leavemany friends to take up his quarrel, the man who has killed him muststill say good bye to his friends and fly the country; whereas we havebeen killing the stay of a whole town, and all the picked youth ofIthaca. I would have you consider this matter."

提交评论