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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:劳尔 大小:ZqFpz3hj33182KB 下载:QzH7TbiC13141次
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日期:2020-08-07 19:06:13
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秦波

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  So much delight, etc.
2.  Wherein, you have not onely performed more then I could wish, upon asubject so sutable to my minde: but in every Novell, such variety ofexcellent matter, such singular illustrations, and delicateeloquence hath flowne from you all; as I am utterly unable to inventany thing (notwithstanding the most curious search of my braine) aptor fit for the purpose, to paragon the meanest of them alreadyrelated. And therefore seeing I must needs sinne in the Lawestablished by my selfe; I tender my submission, as worthy ofpunishment, or what amends else you please to enjoyne mee. Now, asreturned to my wonted priviledge, I say, that the Novell recountedby Madame Eliza, of the Fryar Godfather and his Gossip Agnesia, asalso the sottishnesse of the Senese her Husband, hath wrought in me(worthy Ladies) to such effect; as, forbearing to speake any more ofthese wily prancks, which witty wives exercise on their simpleHusbands; I am to tell you a pretty short Tale; which, though there ismatter enough in it, not worthy the crediting, yet partly it willbee pleasing to heare.
3.  Then pausing a while, and sodainely rapping out a Lovers Oath ortwo, thus he proceeded. My dearest Bruno, thou shalt see how I cantickle my Gitterne, and what good sport will ensue thereon. If thoudost observe me with judgement, why man, I am not so old as I seeme tobe, and she could perceive it at the very first view; yea, and sheshall finde it so too, when we have leysure to consult upon furtheroccasions: I finde my selfe in such a free and frolicke jocunditieof spirit, that I will make her to follow me, even as a fond womandoth after her child.
4.  REPREHENDING THE FOLLY OF SUCH MEN, AS UNDERTAKE TO REPORT
5.  It came to passe, that in so great a concourse of people, asresorted thither from all parts; three of our Citizens went toTrevers, one of them being named Stechio, the second Martellino, andthe third Marquiso, all being men of such condition, as frequentedPrinces Courts, to give them delight by pleasant and counterfettedqualities. None of these men having ever beene at Trevers before,seeing how the people crowded thorow the streetes, wondered greatlythereat: but when they knew the reason why the throngs ranne on heapesin such sort together, they grew as desirous to see the Shrine, as anyof the rest. Having ordered all affaires at their lodging, Marquisosaide; It is fit for us to see this Saint, but I know not how we shallattaine thereto, because (as I have heard) the place is guarded byGermaine Souldiers, and other warlike men, commanded thither by theGovernour of this City, least any outrage should be there committed:And beside, the Church is so full of people, as we shall nevercompasse to get neere. Martellino being also as forward in desire tosee it, presently replied. All this difficulty cannot dismay me, but Iwill go to the very body of the Saint it selfe. But how? quothMarquiso. I will tell thee, answered Martellino. I purpose to go inthe disguise of an impotent lame person, supported on the one sideby thy selfe, and on the other by Stechio, as if I were not able towalke of my selfe: And you two thus sustaining me, desiring to comeneere the Saint to cure me; every one will make way, and freely giveyou leave to go on.
6.  Ah Master Doctor, the love I be to your capricious and rarelycircumcised experience, and likewise the confidence I repose in yourscrutinous taciturnitie, are both of such mighty and prevailingpower as I cannot conceale any thing from you, which you covet toknow. And therefore, if you wil sweare unto me by the crosse ofMonteson, that never (as you have already faithfully promised) youwill disclose a secret so admirable; I will relate it unto you, andnot otherwise. The Doctor sware, and sware againe, and then Bruno thusbegan.

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1.  But like a Tyrant, full of rancorous hate,
2.  When the long discourse of Madame Emilia was ended, notdispleasing to any, in regard of the length, but rather held tooshort, because no exceptions could bee taken against it, comparing theraritie of the accidents, and changes together: the Queene turned toMadame Lauretto, giving her such a manifest signe, as she knew, thatit was her turne to follow next, and therefore shee tooke occasionto begin thus. Faire Ladies, I intend to tell you a Tale of trueth,which (perhaps) in your opinions, will seeme to sound like a lye:and yet I heard by the very last relation, that a dead man was weptand mournd for, in sted of another being then alive. In which respect,I am now to let you know, how a living man was buried for dead, andbeing raised againe, yet not as living, himselfe, and divers morebeside, did beleeve that he came forth of his grave, and adored him asa Saint, who was the occasion thereof, and who (as a bad man.)deserved justly to be condemned.
3.  Marcus Varro stood like a man confounded with admiration, being verysorrie, for that which the whole assistants had both seene andheard, yet hee could not (with honour) desist from what must needsbe done, but would performe the Lawes severe injunction. And sendingfor condemned Gisippus backe againe, in the presence of Titus, thus hespake to him. How becamest thou so madly incensed, as (without anytorment inflicted on thee) to confesse an offence by thee nevercommitted? Art thou wearie of thy life? Thou chargest thy selfefalsly, to be the person who this last night murdered the man in theCave, and there is another that voluntarily also doth confesse hisguiltinesse.
4.  My Song wants power to relate,
5.  Reason is my warrant in this case, because I cannot remember,since first our entrance into friendship, that ever I enjoyed anything, but it was as much thine, as mine. And if our affaires had suchan equall course before, as otherwise they could not subsist; mustthey not now be kept in the same manner? Can any thing moreperticularly appertaine to me, but thy right therein is as absolute asmine? I know not how thou maist esteeme of my friendship, if in anything concerning my selfe, I can plead my priviledge to be abovethine. True it is, that Sophronia is affianced to me, and I love herdearely, daily expecting when our nuptials shall be celebrated. Butseeing thou doest more fervently affect her, as being better able toJudge of the perfections, remaining in so excellent a creature asshe is, then I doe: assure thy selfe, and beleeve it constantly,that she shall come to my bed, not as my wife but onely thine. Andtherefore leave these despairing thoughts, shake off this cloudydisposition, reassume thy former joviall spirit, with comfort and whatelse can content thee: in expectation of the happy houre, and the justrequitall of thy long, loving, and worthy friendship, which I havealwayes valued equall with mine owne life.
6.  Not doing harme to John or me,

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1.  In these and such like speeches, as thus they beguiled the time,so did they observe it for a dayly course, sometime discipling,other whiles eating and drinking, for the space of ten whole monethstogether: in the which time, the Abbot sildome failed to visiteFerandoes wife, without the least suspition in any of theneighbours, by reason of their setled opinion, concerning thenightly walking Ferandoes ghost. But, as all pleasures cannot beeexempted from some following paine or other, so it came to passe, thatFerandoes wife proved to be conceived with childe, and the time wasdrawing on for her deliverance. Now began the Abbot to consider,that Ferandoes folly was sufficiently chastised, and he had beene longenough in Purgatory: wherefore, the better to countenance all passedinconveniences, it was now thought high time, that Ferando should besent to the world againe, and set free from the paines of Purgatory,as having payed for his jealousie dearely, to teach him betterwisedome hereafter.
2.  Worthie friends, you would constraine me to the thing, wherewith Inever had any intent to meddle, considering, how difficult a case itis to meet with such a woman, who can agree with a man in all hisconditions, and how great the number is of them, who daily happen onthe contrarie: but most (and worst of all the rest) how wretched andmiserable prooves the life of man, who is bound to live with a wifenot fit for him. And in saying, you can learn to understand thecustome and qualities of children, by behaviour of the fathers andmothers, and so to provide mee of a wife, it is a meere argument offolly: for neither shall I comprehend, or you either, the secretinclinations of parents; I meane of the Father, and much lesse thecomplexion of the mother. But admitte it were within compasse of powerto know them; yet it is a frequent sight, and observed every day; thatdaughters doe resemble neither father nor mother, but that they arenaturally governed by their owne instinct.
3.  WHEREBY WEE MAY LEARNE, THAT SUCH THINGS AS SOMETIME SEEME
4.  Sophronia, thinking her selfe to be the maried wife of Gisippus, was(indeed) the wife of Titus Quintus Fulvius, and departed thence withhim to Rome. Within a while after, Gisippus also came thither invery poore condition, and thinking that he was despised by Titus, grewweary of his life, and confessed that he had murdred a man, with fulintent to die for the fact. But Titus taking knowledge of him, anddesiring to save the life of Gisippus, charged himself to have donethe bloody deed. Which the murderer himself (standing then among themultitude) seeing, truly confessed the deed. By meanes whereof, allthree were delivered by the Emperor Octavius; and Titus gave hisSister in mariage to Gisippus, giving them also the most part of hisgoods and inheritances.
5.   Rossiglione leaving his Lady, went into the Kitchin, where callingfor the Cooke, he delivered him the heart, saying: Take this heartof a wilde Boare, which it was my good happe to kill this day, anddresse it in the daintiest manner thou canst devise to do; which beingso done, when I am set at the Table, send it to me in a silver dish,with sauce beseeming so dainty a morsell. The Cooke tooke the heart,beleeving it to be no otherwise, then as his Lord had saide: and usinghis utmost skill in dressing it, did divide it into artificiallsmall slices, and made it most pleasing to be tasted. When supper timewas come, Rossiglione sate downe at the table with his Lady: but hehad little or no appetite at all to eate, the wicked deed which he haddone so perplexed his soule, and made him to sit very strangelymusing. At length, the Cooke brought in the dainty dish, which hehimselfe setting before his wife, began to finde fault with his ownelacke of stomacke, yet provoked her with many faire speeches, totast the Cooks cunning in so rare a dish.
6.  Oh, How can mighty Love permit,

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1.  Our Judge was now in a wofull perplexity, and confessing hisfolly, in marying a wife so young, and far unfit for his age andabilitie: being halfe desperate, sad and displeased, he came forthof the Chamber, using divers speeches to Pagamino, whereof he madelittle or no account at all: and in the end, without any othersuccesse, left his wife there, and returned home to Pisa. Therefurther afflictions fell upon him, because the people began toscorne him, demanding dayly of him, what was become of his gallantyoung wife, making hornes, with ridiculous pointings at him: wherebyhis sences became distracted, so that he ran raving about thestreetes, and afterward died in very miserable manner. Which newescame no sooner to the eare of Pagamino, but, in the honourableaffection hee bare to Bertolomea, he maried her, with great solemnity;banishing all Fasts, Vigils, and Lents from his house, and living withher in much felicity. Wherfore (faire Ladies) I am of opinion, thatBernardo of Geneway, in his disputation with Ambroginolo; might haveshewne himselfe a great deale wiser, and sparing his rash proceedingwith his wife.
2.  In delivering these words, he sweetly kissed and embraced her, asshe sat on the Chest wherein her husband lay: now, what they didelse beside, in recompence of the wrong received, I leave to yourimagination, as rather deserving silence, then immodest blabbing.Spinelloccio, being all this while in the Chest, hearing easily allthe words which Zeppa had uttered, the answer of his wife, as alsowhat Musicke they made over his head: you may guesse in what a case hewas, his heart being ready to split with rage, and, but that hee stoodin feare of Zeppa, he would have railde and exclaimed on his wife,as thus hee lay shut up in the Chest. But entering into betterconsideration, that so great al injury was first begun by himselfe,and Zeppa did no more, then in reason and equity he might well do(having evermore carried himselfe like a kinde neighbour and frendtowards him, without the least offer of distaste) he faithfullyresolved, to be a firmer friend to Zeppa then formerly hee had bin, ifit might be embraced and accepted.
3.  AND DRUNKARDS INTO THEIR SERVICE
4、  After they had ridden on a few dayes together, they came to a River,over which was a goodly Bridge, and because a great company ofHorses and Mules (heavily laden, and after the manner of a Caravanof Camels in Egypt) were first to passe over the saide Bridge; theygladly stayed to permit their passe. The greater number of thembeing already past over, there was one shie and skittish Mule(belike subject to fearefull starting, as oftentimes we see horseshave the like ill quality) that would not passe over the Bridge by anymeanes, wherefore one of the Muletters tooke a good Cudgell, and smoteher at the first gently, as hoping so to procure her passage.Notwithstanding, starting one while backeward, then againe forward,side-wayes, and every way indeed, but the direct Roadway she would notgoe.
5、  Salabetto amazedly wondering thereat, tooke her in his Armes, andweeping also with her, said. Alas my deare Love, what sodainaccident hath befalne you, to urge this lamentable alteration? Ifyou love me, hide it not from me. After he had of entreated her inthis manner, casting her armes about his necke, and sighing as ifher heart would breake, thus she replyed. Ah Salabetto, the onelyjewell of my joy on earth, I knowe not what to do, or say, for (evennow) I received Letters from Messina, wherein my Brother writes to me,that although it cost the sale of all my goods, or whatsoever else Ihave beside, I must (within eight dayes space) not faile to send him athousand Florins of gold, or else he must have his head smitten off,and I know not by what meanes to procure them so soone. For, if thelimitation of fifteene dayes might serve the turne, I could borrowthem in a place, where I can command a farre greater summe, or elseI would sell some part of our Lands. But beeing no way able tofurnish him so soone, I would I had died before I heard thesedismall tydings. And in the uttering of these words, she graced themwith such cunning dissembled sorrow, as if she had meant truly indeed.Salabetto, in whom the fury of his amorous flames, had consumed agreat part of his necessary understanding, beleeving thesecounterfetted tears and complaints of hers, to proceed from anhonest meaning soule; rashly and foolishly thus replied. DeareBiancafiore, I cannot furnish you with a thousand golden Florines, butam able to lend you five hundred if I were sure of their repaymentat fifteene dayes, wherein you are highly beholding to Fortune, that Ihave made sale of all my Cloathes; which if they had lyen still onmy hand, my power could not stretch to lend you five Florines. Alasdeare heart (quoth she) would you be in such want of money, and hideit from her that loves you so loyally? Why did you not make yourneed knowne to me? Although I am not furnished of a thousand Florines;yet I have alwaies ready three or foure hundred by me, to do any kindeoffice for my friend. In thus wronging me, you have robd me of allboldnes, to presume upon your offer made me. Salabetto, far fasterinveigled by these words then before, said. Let not my folly (brightBiancafiore) cause you to refuse my friendly offer, in such a caseof extreme necessity: I have them ready pre. pared for you, and amheartily sory, that my power cannot furnish you with the whole summe.

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  • 卡纳克 08-06

      The Lords and all the rest, were wondrously joyfull to heare himso well inclined, expressing no lesse by their shouts and jocundsuffrages: protesting cordially, that she should be welcommed withpompe and majestie, and honoured of them all, as their Liege Ladie andSoveraigne. Afterward, they made preparation for a princely andmagnificent feast, as the Marquesse did the like, for a marriage ofextraordinary state and qualitie, inviting all his kinred, friends,and acquaintance in all parts and Provinces, about him. Hee madealso readie most riche and costly garments, shaped by the body of acomely young Gentlewoman, who he knew to be equall in proportion andstature, to her of whom hee hade made his election.

  • 段俊 08-06

      THE SECOND DAY, THE THIRD NOVELL

  • 王作良 08-06

       When day light was come, and the dead body found lying in the Porch,it moved very much greefe and amazement, considering, he had bin seenethe day before, in perfect health to outward appearance. Nor needewe to urge any question of his Mothers sorrow upon this strangeaccident, who, causing his body to be carefully searched, withoutany blow, bruise, wound, or hurt uppon it, the Physitians could notgive any other opinion, but that some inward conceyte of greefe hadcaused his death, as it did indeed, and no way otherwise. To thecheefe Church was the dead body carried, to be generally seene ofall the people, his Mother and Friends weeping heavily by it, asmany more did the like beside, because he was beloved of every one. Inwhich time of universall mourning, the honest man (in whose house hedyed) spake thus to his wife: Disguise thy selfe in some decentmanner, and go to the Church, where (as I heare) they have laide thebody of Jeronimo. Crowde in amongest the Women, as I will do thelike amongst the men, to heare what opinion passeth of his death,and whether we shall be scandalized thereby, or no.

  • 张正友 08-06

      Seating her selfe by him, as if shee had some weighty matter to tellhim; she proceeded in this manner. Alas my Lord, you shall not need toquestion them, because I can sufficiently resolve you therein: which(neverthelesse) I have long concealed, because I would not beoffensive to you. But in regard, it is now manifestly apparant, thatothers have tasted, what (I immagined) none but my selfe did, I willno longer hide it from you. Assuredly Sir, there is a most strange andunwonted ill-savour, continually issuing from your mouth, smellingmost noysomely, and I wonder what should be the occasion. In formertimes, I never felt any such foule breathing to come from you: andyou, who do dally converse with so many worthy persons, should seekemeanes to be rid of so great an annoyance. You say verie true wife(answered Nicostratus) and I protest to you on my Credite, I feeleno such ill smell, neither know what should cause it, except I havesom corrupted tooth in my mouth. Perhaps Sir (quoth she) it may be so,and yet you feele not the savour which others do, yea, veryoffensively.

  • 蒋旗帜 08-05

    {  Greevous, and full of compassion, appeared the hard Fortunes ofMadame Helena to be, having much descontented, and (well-neere)wearied all the Ladies in hearing them recounted. But because theywere very justly inflicted upon her, and according as (in equity) sheehad deserved, they were the more moderate in their commisseration:howbeit, they reputed the Scholler not onely over-obstinate, butalso too strict, rigorous and severe. Wherefore, when MadamePampinea had finished hir Novell, the Queene gave command to MadameFiammetta, that she should follow next with her discourse; wheretoshee shewing obedience, thus beganne.

  • 吴嫣然 08-04

      HUSBANDES, EITHER IN RESPECT OF THEIR LOVE, OR FOR THE PREVENTION}

  • 常勇 08-04

      Buffalmaco and Bruno hearing this, made shew of verie muchmervailing thereat, and many times maintained what Calandrino hadsaid; being well neere ready to burst with laughter; considering,how confidently he stood upon it, that he had found the wonderfulstone, and lost it by his wives speaking onely to him. But when theysaw him rise in fury once more, with intent to beat her againe: thenthey stept betweene them; affirming, That the woman had no wayoffended in this case, but rather he himself: who knowing that womencause all things to lose their vertue, had not therefore expreslycommanded her, not to be seene in his presence all that day, untill hehad made full proofe of the stones vertue. And questionles, theconsideration of a matter so availeable and important, was quite takenfrom him, because such an especiall happinesse, should not belong tohim only; but (in part) to his friends, whom he had acquaintedtherewith, drew them to the plaine with him in companie, where theytooke as much paines in serch of the stone, as possibly he did, orcould; and yet (dishonestly) he would deceive them, and beare itaway covetously, for his owne private benefit.

  • 倪鹏辉 08-04

      THE SEVENTH DAY, THE SECOND NOVELL

  • 王运华 08-03

       Therein I see, upon good observation,

  • 王雨生 08-01

    {  Gossip Pietro holding the Candle, and the woman being prepared asJohn had appointed her, she bowed her selfe forwardes with her handsset to the ground, even as if she stood upon foure feete. First withhis hands he touched her head and face, saying, Heere is the goodlyhead of a Mule: then handling her disheveld haire, termed them thegoodly mane of a Mule. Afterwardes, touching the body, armes, legs,and feete, gave them all the apt names (for those parts) belongingto a Mule, nothing else remaining, but onely the forming of the taile,which when Pietro perceived, how John was preparing to fasten it on(having no way misliked all his former proceeding:) he called tohim, saying: Forbeare Gossippe John, my Mule shal have no taile atall, I am contented to have her without a taile.

  • 刘双平 08-01

      You must put some friend in trust, to invite your Neighbors(especially such as you suspect) to a breakfast in the morning: andbecause it is done as a feast in kindnesse, they will come to youthe more willingly. This night will I and Buffalmaco take suchorder, that the Pilles shall have the charge imposed on them, and thenwee will bring them hither againe in the morning: and I, my selfe (foryour sake) will deliver them to your guests, and performe whatsoeveris to bee sayde or done. On the next morning, a goodly company beingassembled, under a faire Elme before the Church; as well youngFlorentynes (who purposely came to make themselves merry) asneighbouring Husbandmen of the Village: Bruno was to begin theservice, with the Pils in a faire Cup, and Buffalmaco followed himwith another Cup, to deliver the wine out of the Flaggon, all thecompany beeing set round, as in a circle; and Bruno with Buffalmacobeing in the midst of them, Bruno thus spake.Honest friends, it is fit that I should acquaint you with theoccasion, why we are thus met together, and in this place: becauseif anie thing may seeme offensive to you; afterward you shall makeno complaint of me. From Calandrino (our loving friend heerepresent) yesternight there was a new-kild fat Brawne taken, but whohath done the deede, as yet he knoweth not; and because none other,but some one (or more) heere among us, must needs offend in this case:he, desiring to understand who they be, would have each man to receiveone of these Pilles, and afterward to drinke of this Wine; assuringyou all, that whosoever stole the Brawne hence, cannot be able toswallow the Pill: for it wil be so extreme bitter in his mouth, asit will enforce him to Coughe and spet extraordinarily. In whichrespect, before such a notorious shame be received, and in so goodlyan assembly, as now are heere present: it were much better for himor them that have the Brawne, to confesse it in private to this honestPriest, and I will abstaine from urging anie such publike proofe.

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