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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:陈大妈 大小:IcGgHPon68340KB 下载:5ypyXmD145692次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:SWEvU3gK82962条
日期:2020-08-07 04:13:29
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  The kind whisper went to my heart like a dagger.
2.  'Humph!' said Mr. Rochester, and he took his tea in silence.
3.  'Well, you know, Missis always said they were poor and quitedespicable: and they may be poor; but I believe they are as muchgentry as the Reeds are; for one day, nearly seven years ago, a Mr.Eyre came to Gateshead and wanted to see you; Missis said you wereat school fifty miles off; he seemed so much disappointed, for hecould not stay: he was going on a voyage to a foreign country, and theship was to sail from London in a day or two. He looked quite agentleman, and I believe he was your father's brother.'
4.  Mrs. Reed looked up from her work; her eye settled on mine, herfingers at the same time suspended their nimble movements.
5.  I came. 'Excuse me,' he continued: 'necessity compels me to makeyou useful.' He laid a heavy hand on my shoulder, and leaning on mewith some stress, limped to his horse. Having once caught thebridle, he mastered it directly and sprang to his saddle; grimacinggrimly as he made the effort, for it wrenched his sprain.
6.  And where, meantime, was Helen Burns? Why did I not spend thesesweet days of liberty with her? Had I forgotten her? or was I soworthless as to have grown tired of her pure society? Surely theMary Ann Wilson I have mentioned was inferior to my firstacquaintance: she could only tell me amusing stories, andreciprocate any racy and pungent gossip I chose to indulge in;while, if I have spoken truth of Helen, she was qualified to givethose who enjoyed the privilege of her converse a taste of farhigher things.

计划指导

1.  'Is Mr. Rochester an exacting, fastidious sort of man?'
2.  I did not like re-entering Thornfield. To pass its threshold was toreturn to stagnation; to cross the silent hall, to ascend the darksomestaircase, to seek my own lonely little room, and then to meettranquil Mrs. Fairfax, and spend the long winter evening with her, andher only, was to quell wholly the faint excitement wakened by mywalk,- to slip again over my faculties the viewless fetters of anuniform and too still existence; of an existence whose very privilegesof security and ease I was becoming incapable of appreciating. Whatgood it would have done me at that time to have been tossed in thestorms of an uncertain struggling life, and to have been taught byrough and bitter experience to long for the calm amidst which I nowrepined! Yes, just as much good as it would do a man tired ofsitting still in a 'too easy chair' to take a long walk: and just asnatural was the wish to stir, under my circumstances, as it would beunder his.
3.  I resolved, in the depth of my heart, that I would be mostmoderate- most correct; and, having reflected a few minutes in orderto arrange coherently what I had to say, I told her all the story ofmy sad childhood. Exhausted by emotion, my language was more subduedthan it generally was when it developed that sad theme; and mindful ofHelen's warnings against the indulgence of resentment, I infusedinto the narrative far less of gall and wormwood than ordinary. Thusrestrained and simplified, it sounded more credible: I felt as Iwent on that Miss Temple fully believed me.
4.  The answer was evasive. I should have liked something clearer;but Mrs. Fairfax either could not, or would not, give me more explicitinformation of the origin and nature of Mr. Rochester's trials. Sheaverred they were a mystery to herself, and that what she knew waschiefly from conjecture. It was evident, indeed, that she wished me todrop the subject, which I did accordingly.
5.  When Mrs. Fairfax had bidden me a kind good-night, and I hadfastened my door, gazed leisurely round, and in some measure effacedthe eerie impression made by that wide hall, that dark and spaciousstaircase, and that long, cold gallery, by the livelier aspect of mylittle room, I remembered that, after a day of bodily fatigue andmental anxiety, I was now at last in safe haven. The impulse ofgratitude swelled my heart, and I knelt down at the bedside, andoffered up thanks where thanks were due; not forgetting, ere I rose,to implore aid on my further path, and the power of meriting thekindness which seemed so frankly offered me before it was earned. Mycouch had no thorns in it that night; my solitary room no fears. Atonce weary and content, I slept soon and soundly: when I awoke itwas broad day.
6.  'I will indeed send her to school soon,' murmured Mrs. Reed sottovoce; and gathering up her work, she abruptly quitted the apartment.

推荐功能

1.  Men are hard-hearted, and kind angels only
2.  A NEW chapter in a novel is something like a new scene in a play;and when I draw up the curtain this time, reader, you must fancy yousee a room in the George Inn at Millcote, with such large figuredpapering on the walls as inn rooms have; such a carpet, suchfurniture, such ornaments on the mantel-piece, such prints,including a portrait of George the Third, and another of the Prince ofWales, and a representation of the death of Wolfe. All this is visibleto you by the light of an oil lamp hanging from the ceiling, and bythat of an excellent fire, near which I sit in my cloak and bonnet; mymuff and umbrella lie on the table, and I am warming away the numbnessand chill contracted by sixteen hours' exposure to the rawness of anOctober day: I left Lowton at four o'clock A.M., and the Millcote townclock is now just striking eight.
3.  He ran headlong at me: I felt him grasp my hair and my shoulder: hehad closed with a desperate thing. I really saw in him a tyrant, amurderer. I felt a drop or two of blood from my head trickle down myneck, and was sensible of somewhat pungent suffering: these sensationsfor the time predominated over fear, and I received him in franticsort. I don't very well know what I did with my hands, but he calledme 'Rat! Rat!' and bellowed out aloud. Aid was near him: Eliza andGeorgiana had run for Mrs. Reed, who was gone upstairs: she now cameupon the scene, followed by Bessie and her maid Abbot. We were parted:I heard the words-
4.  On reaching the bedroom, we heard the voice of Miss Scatcherd:she was examining drawers; she had just pulled out Helen Burns's,and when we entered Helen was greeted with a sharp reprimand, and toldthat to-morrow she should have half a dozen of untidily foldedarticles pinned to her shoulder.
5.   Mrs. Reed looked up from her work; her eye settled on mine, herfingers at the same time suspended their nimble movements.
6.  My favourite seat was a smooth and broad stone, rising white anddry from the very middle of the beck, and only to be got at bywading through the water; a feat I accomplished barefoot. The stonewas just broad enough to accommodate, comfortably, another girl andme, at that time my chosen comrade- one Mary Ann Wilson; a shrewd,observant personage, whose society I took pleasure in, partlybecause she was witty and original, and partly because she had amanner which set me at my ease. Some years older than I, she knew moreof the world, and could tell me many things I liked to hear: withher my curiosity found gratification: to my faults also she gave ampleindulgence, never imposing curb or rein on anything I said. She hada turn for narrative, I for analysis; she liked to inform, I toquestion; so we got on swimmingly together, deriving muchentertainment, if not much improvement, from our mutual intercourse.

应用

1.  'You had this morning a breakfast which you could not eat; you mustbe hungry:- I have ordered that a lunch of bread and cheese shall beserved to all.'
2.  'And so you're glad to leave me?'
3.  THE promise of a smooth career, which my first calm introduction toThornfield Hall seemed to pledge, was not belied on a longeracquaintance with the place and its inmates. Mrs. Fairfax turned outto be what she appeared, a placid-tempered, kind-natured woman, ofcompetent education and average intelligence. My pupil was a livelychild, who had been spoilt and indulged, and therefore was sometimeswayward; but as she was committed entirely to my care, and noinjudicious interference from any quarter ever thwarted my plans forher improvement, she soon forgot her little freaks, and becameobedient and teachable. She had no great talents, no marked traitsof character, no peculiar development of feeling or taste which raisedher one inch above the ordinary level of childhood; but neither hadshe any deficiency or vice which sunk her below it. She madereasonable progress, entertained for me a vivacious, though perhapsnot very profound, affection; and by her simplicity, gay prattle,and efforts to please, inspired me, in return, with a degree ofattachment sufficient to make us both content in each other's society.
4、  The other members of the household, viz., John and his wife, Leahthe housemaid, and Sophie the French nurse, were decent people; but inno respect remarkable; with Sophie I used to talk French, andsometimes I asked her questions about her native country; but shewas not of a descriptive or narrative turn, and generally gave suchvapid and confused answers as were calculated rather to check thanencourage inquiry.
5、  I was stiff with long sitting, and bewildered with the noise andmotion of the coach: gathering my faculties, I looked about me.Rain, wind, and darkness filled the air; nevertheless, I dimlydiscerned a wall before me and a door open in it; through this doorI passed with my new guide: she shut and locked it behind her. Therewas now visible a house or houses- for the building spread far- withmany windows, and lights burning in some; we went up a broad pebblypath, splashing wet, and were admitted at a door; then the servant ledme through a passage into a room with a fire, where she left me alone.

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网友评论(R5tPdaDC10957))

  • 康世伟 08-06

      Mrs. Reed and I were left alone: some minutes passed in silence;she was sewing, I was watching her. Mrs. Reed might be at that timesome six or seven and thirty; she was a woman of robust frame,square-shouldered and strong-limbed, not tall, and, though stout,not obese: she had a somewhat large face, the under jaw being muchdeveloped and very solid; her brow was low, her chin large andprominent, mouth and nose sufficiently regular; under her lighteyebrows glimmered an eye devoid of ruth; her skin was dark andopaque, her hair nearly flaxen; her constitution was sound as abell- illness never came near her; she was an exact, clever manager;her household and tenantry were thoroughly under her control; herchildren only at times defied her authority and laughed it to scorn;she dressed well, and had a presence and port calculated to set offhandsome attire.

  • 翁健 08-06

      'What! what!' he cried. 'Did she say that to me? Did you hearher, Eliza and Georgiana? Won't I tell mama? but first-'

  • 张家堡 08-06

       'This is the state of things I quite approve,' returned Mrs.Reed; 'had I sought all England over, I could scarcely have found asystem more exactly fitting a child like Jane Eyre. Consistency, mydear Mr. Brocklehurst; I advocate consistency in all things.'

  • 张新保 08-06

      And a tray was soon brought. How pretty, to my eyes, did thechina cups and bright teapot look, placed on the little round tablenear the fire! How fragrant was the steam of the beverage, and thescent of the toast! of which, however, I, to my dismay (for I wasbeginning to be hungry), discerned only a very small portion: MissTemple discerned it too.

  • 白瀛 08-05

    {  Each picture told a story; mysterious often to my undevelopedunderstanding and imperfect feelings, yet ever profoundly interesting:as interesting as the tales Bessie sometimes narrated on winterevenings, when she chanced to be in good humour; and when, havingbrought her ironing-table to the nursery hearth, she allowed us to sitabout it, and while she got up Mrs. Reed's lace frills, and crimpedher nightcap borders, fed our eager attention with passages of loveand adventure taken from old fairy tales and other ballads; or (asat a later period I discovered) from the pages of Pamela, and Henry,Earl of Moreland.

  • 张振文 08-04

      'It was quite right, Bessie. Your Missis has not been my friend:she has been my foe.'}

  • 谷平 08-04

      'You came to bid me good-bye, then: you are just in time probably.'

  • 菅野美穗 08-04

      Mrs. Reed and I were left alone: some minutes passed in silence;she was sewing, I was watching her. Mrs. Reed might be at that timesome six or seven and thirty; she was a woman of robust frame,square-shouldered and strong-limbed, not tall, and, though stout,not obese: she had a somewhat large face, the under jaw being muchdeveloped and very solid; her brow was low, her chin large andprominent, mouth and nose sufficiently regular; under her lighteyebrows glimmered an eye devoid of ruth; her skin was dark andopaque, her hair nearly flaxen; her constitution was sound as abell- illness never came near her; she was an exact, clever manager;her household and tenantry were thoroughly under her control; herchildren only at times defied her authority and laughed it to scorn;she dressed well, and had a presence and port calculated to set offhandsome attire.

  • 玛塔姆班纳 08-03

       Bessie invited him to walk into the breakfast-room, and led the wayout. In the interview which followed between him and Mrs. Reed, Ipresume, from after-occurrences, that the apothecary ventured torecommend my being sent to school; and the recommendation was no doubtreadily enough adopted; for as Abbot said, in discussing the subjectwith Bessie when both sat sewing in the nursery one night, after I wasin bed, and, as they thought, asleep, 'Missis was, she dared say, gladenough to get rid of such a tiresome, ill-conditioned child, whoalways looked as if she were watching everybody, and scheming plotsunderhand.' Abbot, I think, gave me credit for being a sort ofinfantine Guy Fawkes.

  • 姚媛 08-01

    {  'I am not your dear; I cannot lie down: send me to school soon,Mrs. Reed, for I hate to live here.'

  • 张立东 08-01

      'No, that will do: but after your mama went to the Holy Virgin,as you say, with whom did you live then?'

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