0 am平台手机版网址-APP安装下载

am平台手机版网址 注册最新版下载

am平台手机版网址 注册

am平台手机版网址注册

类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:石井镇 大小:j5rXE9qg66751KB 下载:Q77lCqdm65325次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:hJnmyZHy70646条
日期:2020-08-03 18:10:05
安卓
石马河

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  She then went quickly on, and Telemachus followed in her stepstill they reached the place where the guilds of the Pylian people wereassembled. There they found Nestor sitting with his sons, while hiscompany round him were busy getting dinner ready, and putting piecesof meat on to the spits while other pieces were cooking. When they sawthe strangers they crowded round them, took them by the hand andbade them take their places. Nestor's son Pisistratus at onceoffered his hand to each of them, and seated them on some softsheepskins that were lying on the sands near his father and hisbrother Thrasymedes. Then he gave them their portions of the inwardmeats and poured wine for them into a golden cup, handing it toMinerva first, and saluting her at the same time.
2.  The others applauded what Antinous had said, and each one sent hisservant to bring his present. Antinous's man returned with a large andlovely dress most exquisitely embroidered. It had twelve beautifullymade brooch pins of pure gold with which to fasten it. Eurymachusimmediately brought her a magnificent chain of gold and amber beadsthat gleamed like sunlight. Eurydamas's two men returned with someearrings fashioned into three brilliant pendants which glistenedmost beautifully; while king Pisander son of Polyctor gave her anecklace of the rarest workmanship, and every one else brought her abeautiful present of some kind.
3.  Thus did he pray. Jove heard his prayer and forthwith thundered highup among the from the splendour of Olympus, and Ulysses was gladwhen he heard it. At the same time within the house, a miller-womanfrom hard by in the mill room lifted up her voice and gave him anothersign. There were twelve miller-women whose business it was to grindwheat and barley which are the staff of life. The others had groundtheir task and had gone to take their rest, but this one had not yetfinished, for she was not so strong as they were, and when she heardthe thunder she stopped grinding and gave the sign to her master."Father Jove," said she, "you who rule over heaven and earth, you havethundered from a clear sky without so much as a cloud in it, andthis means something for somebody; grant the prayer, then, of meyour poor servant who calls upon you, and let this be the very lastday that the suitors dine in the house of Ulysses. They have worn meout with the labour of grinding meal for them, and I hope they maynever have another dinner anywhere at all."
4.  "As he spoke he dived under the waves, whereon I turned back tothe ships with my companions, and my heart was clouded with care asI went along. When we reached the ships we got supper ready, for nightwas falling, and camped down upon the beach. When the child ofmorning, rosy-fingered Dawn appeared, we drew our ships into thewater, and put our masts and sails within them; then we went onboard ourselves, took our seats on the benches, and smote the grey seawith our oars. I again stationed my ships in the heaven-fed streamof Egypt, and offered hecatombs that were full and sufficient. WhenI had thus appeased heaven's anger, I raised a barrow to the memory ofAgamemnon that his name might live for ever, after which I had a quickpassage home, for the gods sent me a fair wind.
5.  "How sad," exclaimed Telemachus, "that all this was of no avail tosave him, nor yet his own iron courage. But now, sir, be pleased tosend us all to bed, that we may lie down and enjoy the blessed boon ofsleep."
6.  They put on their armour as fast as they could- that is to sayUlysses, his three men, and the six sons of Dolius. Laertes also andDolius did the same- warriors by necessity in spite of their greyhair. When they had all put on their armour, they opened the gateand sallied forth, Ulysses leading the way.

计划指导

1.  Irus was very angry and answered, "You filthy glutton, you run ontrippingly like an old fish-fag. I have a good mind to lay bothhands about you, and knock your teeth out of your head like so manyboar's tusks. Get ready, therefore, and let these people here stand byand look on. You will never be able to fight one who is so muchyounger than yourself."
2.  On this pale fear laid hold of them, and old Halitherses, son ofMastor, rose to speak, for he was the only man among them who knewboth past and future; so he spoke to them plainly and in allhonesty, saying,
3.  MEANWHILE Ulysses and the swineherd had lit a fire in the hut andwere were getting breakfast ready at daybreak for they had sent themen out with the pigs. When Telemachus came up, the dogs did not bark,but fawned upon him, so Ulysses, hearing the sound of feet andnoticing that the dogs did not bark, said to Eumaeus:
4.  "Thus, then, did we wait in great fear of mind till morning came,but when the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, themale sheep hurried out to feed, while the ewes remained bleating aboutthe pens waiting to be milked, for their udders were full to bursting;but their master in spite of all his pain felt the backs of all thesheep as they stood upright, without being sharp enough to find outthat the men were underneath their bellies. As the ram was goingout, last of all, heavy with its fleece and with the weight of mycrafty self; Polyphemus laid hold of it and said:
5.  The minstrel Phemius son of Terpes- he who had been forced by thesuitors to sing to them- now tried to save his life. He was standingnear towards the trap door, and held his lyre in his hand. He didnot know whether to fly out of the cloister and sit down by thealtar of Jove that was in the outer court, and on which both Laertesand Ulysses had offered up the thigh bones of many an ox, or whetherto go straight up to Ulysses and embrace his knees, but in the endhe deemed it best to embrace Ulysses' knees. So he laid his lyre onthe ground the ground between the mixing-bowl and the silver-studdedseat; then going up to Ulysses he caught hold of his knees and said,"Ulysses, I beseech you have mercy on me and spare me. You will besorry for it afterwards if you kill a bard who can sing both forgods and men as I can. I make all my lays myself, and heaven visits mewith every kind of inspiration. I would sing to you as though you werea god, do not therefore be in such a hurry to cut my head off. Yourown son Telemachus will tell you that I did not want to frequentyour house and sing to the suitors after their meals, but they weretoo many and too strong for me, so they made me."
6.  "Stranger," replied Alcinous, "I am not the kind of man to get angryabout nothing; it is always better to be reasonable; but by FatherJove, Minerva, and Apollo, now that I see what kind of person you are,and how much you think as I do, I wish you would stay here, marry mydaughter, and become my son-in-law. If you will stay I will give you ahouse and an estate, but no one (heaven forbid) shall keep you hereagainst your own wish, and that you may be sure of this I willattend to-morrow to the matter of your escort. You can sleep duringthe whole voyage if you like, and the men shall sail you over smoothwaters either to your own home, or wherever you please, even though itbe a long way further off than Euboea, which those of my people whosaw it when they took yellow-haired Rhadamanthus to see Tityus the sonof Gaia, tell me is the furthest of any place- and yet they did thewhole voyage in a single day without distressing themselves, andcame back again afterwards. You will thus see how much my shipsexcel all others, and what magnificent oarsmen my sailors are."

推荐功能

1.  "Then I took my sword of bronze and slung it over my shoulders; Ialso took my bow, and told Eurylochus to come back with me and show methe way. But he laid hold of me with both his hands and spokepiteously, saying, 'Sir, do not force me to go with you, but let mestay here, for I know you will not bring one of them back with you,nor even return alive yourself; let us rather see if we cannotescape at any rate with the few that are left us, for we may stillsave our lives.'
2.  "Thus spoke Eurylochus, and the men approved his words. I saw thatheaven meant us a mischief and said, 'You force me to yield, for youare many against one, but at any rate each one of you must take hissolemn oath that if he meet with a herd of cattle or a large flockof sheep, he will not be so mad as to kill a single head of either,but will be satisfied with the food that Circe has given us.'
3.  THEN Ulysses tore off his rags, and sprang on to the broadpavement with his bow and his quiver full of arrows. He shed thearrows on to the ground at his feet and said, "The mighty contest isat an end. I will now see whether Apollo will vouchsafe it to me tohit another mark which no man has yet hit."
4.  Ulysses answered, "Telemachus, you ought not to be so immeasurablyastonished at my being really here. There is no other Ulysses who willcome hereafter. Such as I am, it is I, who after long wandering andmuch hardship have got home in the twentieth year to my own country.What you wonder at is the work of the redoubtable goddess Minerva, whodoes with me whatever she will, for she can do what she pleases. Atone moment she makes me like a beggar, and the next I am a young manwith good clothes on my back; it is an easy matter for the gods wholive in heaven to make any man look either rich or poor."
5.   "And I said, 'Circe, no man with any sense of what is right canthink of either eating or drinking in your house until you have sethis friends free and let him see them. If you want me to eat anddrink, you must free my men and bring them to me that I may see themwith my own eyes.'
6.  "Alas," said he to himself, "what kind of people have I comeamongst? Are they cruel, savage, and uncivilized, or hospitable andhumane? I seem to hear the voices of young women, and they soundlike those of the nymphs that haunt mountain tops, or springs ofrivers and meadows of green grass. At any rate I am among a race ofmen and women. Let me try if I cannot manage to get a look at them."

应用

1.  Then Ulysses said to Telemachus, "Call nurse Euryclea; I havesomething to say to her."
2.  With this he got up and made a bed for Ulysses by throwing somegoatskins and sheepskins on the ground in front of the fire. HereUlysses lay down, and Eumaeus covered him over with a great heavycloak that he kept for a change in case of extraordinarily badweather.
3.  Thus they spoke, for they thought that he had killed Antinous bymistake, and did not perceive that death was hanging over the headof every one of them. But Ulysses glared at them and said:
4、  When Euryclea heard this she began to cry, and spoke fondly tohim, saying, "My dear child, what ever can have put such notion asthat into your head? Where in the world do you want to go to- you, whoare the one hope of the house? Your poor father is dead and gone insome foreign country nobody knows where, and as soon as your back isturned these wicked ones here will be scheming to get you put out ofthe way, and will share all your possessions among themselves; staywhere you are among your own people, and do not go wandering andworrying your life out on the barren ocean."
5、  "AFTER we were clear of the river Oceanus, and had got out intothe open sea, we went on till we reached the Aeaean island where thereis dawn and sunrise as in other places. We then drew our ship on tothe sands and got out of her on to the shore, where we went to sleepand waited till day should break.

旧版特色

!

网友评论(9g8fL28070632))

  • 路易十四盛赞 08-02

      "Therefore, Sir, do you on your part affect no more concealmentnor reserve in the matter about which I shall ask you; it will be morepolite in you to give me a plain answer; tell me the name by whichyour father and mother over yonder used to call you, and by whichyou were known among your neighbours and fellow-citizens. There isno one, neither rich nor poor, who is absolutely without any namewhatever, for people's fathers and mothers give them names as soonas they are born. Tell me also your country, nation, and city, thatour ships may shape their purpose accordingly and take you there.For the Phaeacians have no pilots; their vessels have no rudders asthose of other nations have, but the ships themselves understandwhat it is that we are thinking about and want; they know all thecities and countries in the whole world, and can traverse the sea justas well even when it is covered with mist and cloud, so that thereis no danger of being wrecked or coming to any harm. Still I doremember hearing my father say that Neptune was angry with us forbeing too easy-going in the matter of giving people escorts. He saidthat one of these days he should wreck a ship of ours as it wasreturning from having escorted some one, and bury our city under ahigh mountain. This is what my used to say, but whether the god willcarry out his threat or no is a matter which he will decide forhimself.

  • 李晓村 08-02

      "O queen," he said, "I implore your aid- but tell me, are you agoddess or are you a mortal woman? If you are a goddess and dwell inheaven, I can only conjecture that you are Jove's daughter Diana,for your face and figure resemble none but hers; if on the otherhand you are a mortal and live on earth, thrice happy are yourfather and mother- thrice happy, too, are your brothers and sisters;how proud and delighted they must feel when they see so fair a scionas yourself going out to a dance; most happy, however, of all willhe be whose wedding gifts have been the richest, and who takes youto his own home. I never yet saw any one so beautiful, neither man norwoman, and am lost in admiration as I behold you. I can only compareyou to a young palm tree which I saw when I was at Delos growingnear the altar of Apollo- for I was there, too, with much people afterme, when I was on that journey which has been the source of all mytroubles. Never yet did such a young plant shoot out of the groundas that was, and I admired and wondered at it exactly as I nowadmire and wonder at yourself. I dare not clasp your knees, but I amin great distress; yesterday made the twentieth day that I had beentossing about upon the sea. The winds and waves have taken me allthe way from the Ogygian island, and now fate has flung me upon thiscoast that I may endure still further suffering; for I do not thinkthat I have yet come to the end of it, but rather that heaven hasstill much evil in store for me.

  • 沈瑶 08-02

       Noemon then went back to his father's house, but Antinous andEurymachus were very angry. They told the others to leave off playing,and to come and sit down along with themselves. When they came,Antinous son of Eupeithes spoke in anger. His heart was black withrage, and his eyes flashed fire as he said:

  • 周霞见 08-02

      Minerva answered, "Stranger, you must be very simple, or must havecome from somewhere a long way off, not to know what country thisis. It is a very celebrated place, and everybody knows it East andWest. It is rugged and not a good driving country, but it is by nomeans a bid island for what there is of it. It grows any quantity ofcorn and also wine, for it is watered both by rain and dew; itbreeds cattle also and goats; all kinds of timber grow here, and thereare watering places where the water never runs dry; so, sir, thename of Ithaca is known even as far as Troy, which I understand tobe a long way off from this Achaean country."

  • 岳阳婷 08-01

    {  The minstrel Phemius son of Terpes- he who had been forced by thesuitors to sing to them- now tried to save his life. He was standingnear towards the trap door, and held his lyre in his hand. He didnot know whether to fly out of the cloister and sit down by thealtar of Jove that was in the outer court, and on which both Laertesand Ulysses had offered up the thigh bones of many an ox, or whetherto go straight up to Ulysses and embrace his knees, but in the endhe deemed it best to embrace Ulysses' knees. So he laid his lyre onthe ground the ground between the mixing-bowl and the silver-studdedseat; then going up to Ulysses he caught hold of his knees and said,"Ulysses, I beseech you have mercy on me and spare me. You will besorry for it afterwards if you kill a bard who can sing both forgods and men as I can. I make all my lays myself, and heaven visits mewith every kind of inspiration. I would sing to you as though you werea god, do not therefore be in such a hurry to cut my head off. Yourown son Telemachus will tell you that I did not want to frequentyour house and sing to the suitors after their meals, but they weretoo many and too strong for me, so they made me."

  • 陈涛 07-31

      "I too, my son," said she, "have something for you as a keepsakefrom the hand of Helen; it is for your bride to wear upon herwedding day. Till then, get your dear mother to keep it for you;thus may you go back rejoicing to your own country and to your home."}

  • 余龙 07-31

      With this he got up and made a bed for Ulysses by throwing somegoatskins and sheepskins on the ground in front of the fire. HereUlysses lay down, and Eumaeus covered him over with a great heavycloak that he kept for a change in case of extraordinarily badweather.

  • 吉子 07-31

      Menelaus on hearing this was very much shocked. "So," heexclaimed, "these cowards would usurp a brave man's bed? A hindmight as well lay her new born young in the lair of a lion, and thengo off to feed in the forest or in some grassy dell: the lion whenhe comes back to his lair will make short work with the pair ofthem- and so will Ulysses with these suitors. By father Jove, Minerva,and Apollo, if Ulysses is still the man that he was when he wrestledwith Philomeleides in Lesbos, and threw him so heavily that all theAchaeans cheered him- if he is still such and were to come nearthese suitors, they would have a short shrift and a sorry wedding.As regards your questions, however, I will not prevaricate nor deceiveyou, but will tell you without concealment all that the old man of thesea told me.

  • 张骥 07-30

       "My poor fellow, you shall not stay here grieving and frettingyour life out any longer. I am going to send you away of my own freewill; so go, cut some beams of wood, and make yourself a large raftwith an upper deck that it may carry you safely over the sea. I willput bread, wine, and water on board to save you from starving. Iwill also give you clothes, and will send you a fair wind to takeyou home, if the gods in heaven so will it- for they know more aboutthese things, and can settle them better than I can."

  • 陈法拉 07-28

    {  "Wife," said he, turning to Queen Arete, "Go, fetch the best chestwe have, and put a clean cloak and shirt in it. Also, set a copperon the fire and heat some water; our guest will take a warm bath;see also to the careful packing of the presents that the noblePhaeacians have made him; he will thus better enjoy both his supperand the singing that will follow. I shall myself give him thisgolden goblet- which is of exquisite workmanship- that he may bereminded of me for the rest of his life whenever he makes adrink-offering to Jove, or to any of the gods."

  • 林群 07-28

      As soon as Euryclea had got the scarred limb in her hands and hadwell hold of it, she recognized it and dropped the foot at once. Theleg fell into the bath, which rang out and was overturned, so that allthe water was spilt on the ground; Euryclea's eyes between her joy andher grief filled with tears, and she could not speak, but she caughtUlysses by the beard and said, "My dear child, I am sure you must beUlysses himself, only I did not know you till I had actually touchedand handled you."

提交评论