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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:布鲁斯·里德尔 大小:KE3r4mxk19635KB 下载:w8g0iocO27172次
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日期:2020-08-04 20:07:40
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本尼迪克特·康伯巴奇

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  On this he put the bow down, letting it lean against the door[that led into the house] with the arrow standing against the top ofthe bow. Then he sat down on the seat from which he had risen, andAntinous said:
2.  She then went quickly on, and Telemachus followed in her stepstill they reached the place where the guilds of the Pylian people wereassembled. There they found Nestor sitting with his sons, while hiscompany round him were busy getting dinner ready, and putting piecesof meat on to the spits while other pieces were cooking. When they sawthe strangers they crowded round them, took them by the hand andbade them take their places. Nestor's son Pisistratus at onceoffered his hand to each of them, and seated them on some softsheepskins that were lying on the sands near his father and hisbrother Thrasymedes. Then he gave them their portions of the inwardmeats and poured wine for them into a golden cup, handing it toMinerva first, and saluting her at the same time.
3.  "Then I tried to find some way of embracing my mother's ghost.Thrice I sprang towards her and tried to clasp her in my arms, buteach time she flitted from my embrace as it were a dream or phantom,and being touched to the quick I said to her, 'Mother, why do younot stay still when I would embrace you? If we could throw our armsaround one another we might find sad comfort in the sharing of oursorrows even in the house of Hades; does Proserpine want to lay astill further load of grief upon me by mocking me with a phantomonly?'
4.  Ulysses hailed this as of good omen, and Antinous set a great goat'spaunch before him filled with blood and fat. Amphinomus took twoloaves out of the bread-basket and brought them to him, pledging himas he did so in a golden goblet of wine. "Good luck to you," hesaid, "father stranger, you are very badly off at present, but Ihope you will have better times by and by."
5.  "My dears, heaven has been pleased to try me with more afflictionthan any other woman of my age and country. First I lost my braveand lion-hearted husband, who had every good quality under heaven, andwhose name was great over all Hellas and middle Argos, and now mydarling son is at the mercy of the winds and waves, without myhaving heard one word about his leaving home. You hussies, there wasnot one of you would so much as think of giving me a call out of mybed, though you all of you very well knew when he was starting. If Ihad known he meant taking this voyage, he would have had to give itup, no matter how much he was bent upon it, or leave me a corpsebehind him- one or other. Now, however, go some of you and call oldDolius, who was given me by my father on my marriage, and who is mygardener. Bid him go at once and tell everything to Laertes, who maybe able to hit on some plan for enlisting public sympathy on our side,as against those who are trying to exterminate his own race and thatof Ulysses."
6.  "Alcinous," answered Ulysses, "there is a time for makingspeeches, and a time for going to bed; nevertheless, since you sodesire, I will not refrain from telling you the still sadder tale ofthose of my comrades who did not fall fighting with the Trojans, butperished on their return, through the treachery of a wicked woman.

计划指导

1.  "'Sir,' he answered with a groan, 'it was all bad luck, and my ownunspeakable drunkenness. I was lying asleep on the top of Circe'shouse, and never thought of coming down again by the great staircasebut fell right off the roof and broke my neck, so my soul down tothe house of Hades. And now I beseech you by all those whom you haveleft behind you, though they are not here, by your wife, by the fatherwho brought you up when you were a child, and by Telemachus who is theone hope of your house, do what I shall now ask you. I know thatwhen you leave this limbo you will again hold your ship for the Aeaeanisland. Do not go thence leaving me unwaked and unburied behind you,or I may bring heaven's anger upon you; but burn me with whateverarmour I have, build a barrow for me on the sea shore, that may tellpeople in days to come what a poor unlucky fellow I was, and plantover my grave the oar I used to row with when I was yet alive and withmy messmates.' And I said, 'My poor fellow, I will do all that youhave asked of me.'
2.  BOOK XVI.
3.  "I will not refuse you," replied Telemachus, "if you wish to joinus. Come, therefore, and in Ithaca we will treat you hospitablyaccording to what we have."
4.  "Then, when the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, Isent some men to Circe's house to fetch the body of Elpenor. We cutfirewood from a wood where the headland jutted out into the sea, andafter we had wept over him and lamented him we performed his funeralrites. When his body and armour had been burned to ashes, we raiseda cairn, set a stone over it, and at the top of the cairn we fixed theoar that he had been used to row with.
5.  The suitors all came up laughing, and gathered round the tworagged tramps. "Listen to me," said Antinous, "there are some goats'paunches down at the fire, which we have filled with blood and fat,and set aside for supper; he who is victorious and proves himself tobe the better man shall have his pick of the lot; he shall be freeof our table and we will not allow any other beggar about the house atall."
6.  "I was broken hearted when I heard that I must go back all that longand terrible voyage to Egypt; nevertheless, I answered, 'I will doall, old man, that you have laid upon me; but now tell me, and tell metrue, whether all the Achaeans whom Nestor and I left behind us whenwe set sail from Troy have got home safely, or whether any one of themcame to a bad end either on board his own ship or among his friendswhen the days of his fighting were done.'

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1.  When he had thus spoken, he said to his son Mercury, "Mercury, youare our messenger, go therefore and tell Calypso we have decreedthat poor Ulysses is to return home. He is to be convoyed neither bygods nor men, but after a perilous voyage of twenty days upon a rafthe is to reach fertile Scheria, the land of the Phaeacians, who arenear of kin to the gods, and will honour him as though he were oneof ourselves. They will send him in a ship to his own country, andwill give him more bronze and gold and raiment than he would havebrought back from Troy, if he had had had all his prize money andhad got home without disaster. This is how we have settled that heshall return to his country and his friends."
2.  Eurymachus was furious at all this. He scowled at him and cried,"You wretch, I will soon pay you out for daring to say such thingsto me, and in public too. Has the wine been getting into your heador do you always babble in this way? You seem to have lost your witsbecause you beat the tramp Irus. With this he caught hold of afootstool, but Ulysses sought protection at the knees of Amphinomus ofDulichium, for he was afraid. The stool hit the cupbearer on his righthand and knocked him down: the man fell with a cry flat on his back,and his wine-jug fell ringing to the ground. The suitors in thecovered cloister were now in an uproar, and one would turn towards hisneighbour, saying, "I wish the stranger had gone somewhere else, badluck to hide, for all the trouble he gives us. We cannot permit suchdisturbance about a beggar; if such ill counsels are to prevail weshall have no more pleasure at our banquet."
3.  "Very well," replied Telemachus, "go home when you have had yourdinner, and in the morning come here with the victims we are tosacrifice for the day. Leave the rest to heaven and me."
4.  "On this she went back to the house. The Phoenicians stayed awhole year till they had loaded their ship with much preciousmerchandise, and then, when they had got freight enough, they sentto tell the woman. Their messenger, a very cunning fellow, came tomy father's house bringing a necklace of gold with amber beadsstrung among it; and while my mother and the servants had it intheir hands admiring it and bargaining about it, he made a signquietly to the woman and then went back to the ship, whereon shetook me by the hand and led me out of the house. In the fore part ofthe house she saw the tables set with the cups of guests who hadbeen feasting with my father, as being in attendance on him; thesewere now all gone to a meeting of the public assembly, so she snatchedup three cups and carried them off in the bosom of her dress, whileI followed her, for I knew no better. The sun was now set, anddarkness was over all the land, so we hurried on as fast as we couldtill we reached the harbour, where the Phoenician ship was lying. Whenthey had got on board they sailed their ways over the sea, taking uswith them, and Jove sent then a fair wind; six days did we sail bothnight and day, but on the seventh day Diana struck the woman and shefell heavily down into the ship's hold as though she were a sea gullalighting on the water; so they threw her overboard to the seals andfishes, and I was left all sorrowful and alone. Presently the windsand waves took the ship to Ithaca, where Laertes gave sundry of hischattels for me, and thus it was that ever I came to set eyes uponthis country."
5.   "Thus, then, did we sit and hold sad talk with one another, I on theone side of the trench with my sword held over the blood, and theghost of my comrade saying all this to me from the other side. Thencame the ghost of my dead mother Anticlea, daughter to Autolycus. Ihad left her alive when I set out for Troy and was moved to tears whenI saw her, but even so, for all my sorrow I would not let her comenear the blood till I had asked my questions of Teiresias.
6.  But Minerva resolved to help Ulysses, so she bound the ways of allthe winds except one, and made them lie quite still; but she rouseda good stiff breeze from the North that should lay the waters tillUlysses reached the land of the Phaeacians where he would be safe.

应用

1.  Ulysses frowned on him and said, "My friend, I do you no manner ofharm; people give you a great deal, but I am not jealous. There isroom enough in this doorway for the pair of us, and you need notgrudge me things that are not yours to give. You seem to be justsuch another tramp as myself, but perhaps the gods will give us betterluck by and by. Do not, however, talk too much about fighting or youwill incense me, and old though I am, I shall cover your mouth andchest with blood. I shall have more peace to-morrow if I do, for youwill not come to the house of Ulysses any more."
2.  "On this we all went inland, and Eurylochus was not left behindafter all, but came on too, for he was frightened by the severereprimand that I had given him.
3.  On this he broke up the assembly, and every man went back to his ownabode, while the suitors returned to the house of Ulysses.
4、  So now all who escaped death in battle or by shipwreck had gotsafely home except Ulysses, and he, though he was longing to return tohis wife and country, was detained by the goddess Calypso, who had gothim into a large cave and wanted to marry him. But as years went by,there came a time when the gods settled that he should go back toIthaca; even then, however, when he was among his own people, histroubles were not yet over; nevertheless all the gods had now begun topity him except Neptune, who still persecuted him without ceasingand would not let him get home.
5、  Then Penelope came down from her room looking like Venus or Diana,and they set her a seat inlaid with scrolls of silver and ivory nearthe fire in her accustomed place. It had been made by Icmalius and hada footstool all in one piece with the seat itself; and it wascovered with a thick fleece: on this she now sat, and the maids camefrom the women's room to join her. They set about removing thetables at which the wicked suitors had been dining, and took awaythe bread that was left, with the cups from which they had drunk. Theyemptied the embers out of the braziers, and heaped much wood upon themto give both light and heat; but Melantho began to rail at Ulysses asecond time and said, "Stranger, do you mean to plague us by hangingabout the house all night and spying upon the women? Be off, youwretch, outside, and eat your supper there, or you shall be driven outwith a firebrand."

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  • 朱劲松 08-03

      "As for myself I kept on puzzling to think how I could best savemy own life and those of my companions; I schemed and schemed, asone who knows that his life depends upon it, for the danger was verygreat. In the end I deemed that this plan would be the best. Themale sheep were well grown, and carried a heavy black fleece, so Ibound them noiselessly in threes together, with some of the withies onwhich the wicked monster used to sleep. There was to be a man underthe middle sheep, and the two on either side were to cover him, sothat there were three sheep to each man. As for myself there was a ramfiner than any of the others, so I caught hold of him by the back,esconced myself in the thick wool under his belly, and flung onpatiently to his fleece, face upwards, keeping a firm hold on it allthe time.

  • 雷蒙-塞申斯 08-03

      "Listen to me," replied Ulysses, "and think whether Minerva andher father Jove may seem sufficient, or whether I am to try and findsome one else as well."

  • 许小东 08-03

       "Ulysses," said Minerva, "noble son of Laertes, think how you canlay hands on these disreputable people who have been lording it inyour house these three years, courting your wife and making weddingpresents to her, while she does nothing but lament your absence,giving hope and sending your encouraging messages to every one ofthem, but meaning the very opposite of all she says'

  • 岑某 08-03

      And Penelope said, "If the gods are going to vouchsafe you a happiertime in your old age, you may hope then to have some respite frommisfortune."

  • 马克·麦克科林 08-02

    {  On this he handed them a piece of fat roast loin, which had been setnear him as being a prime part, and they laid their hands on thegood things that were before them; as soon as they had had enough toeat and drink, Telemachus said to the son of Nestor, with his headso close that no one might hear, "Look, Pisistratus, man after myown heart, see the gleam of bronze and gold- of amber, ivory, andsilver. Everything is so splendid that it is like seeing the palace ofOlympian Jove. I am lost in admiration."

  • 董红章 08-01

      "And now, tell me and tell me true. Where have you been wandering,and in what countries have you travelled? Tell us of the peoplesthemselves, and of their cities- who were hostile, savage anduncivilized, and who, on the other hand, hospitable and humane. Tellus also why you are made unhappy on hearing about the return of theArgive Danaans from Troy. The gods arranged all this, and sent themtheir misfortunes in order that future generations might havesomething to sing about. Did you lose some brave kinsman of yourwife's when you were before Troy? a son-in-law or father-in-law- whichare the nearest relations a man has outside his own flesh and blood?or was it some brave and kindly-natured comrade- for a good friendis as dear to a man as his own brother?"}

  • 熊猫大侠 08-01

      "'This,' I answered, 'must be as it may please heaven, but tell meand tell me and tell me true, I see my poor mother's ghost close byus; she is sitting by the blood without saying a word, and though I amher own son she does not remember me and speak to me; tell me, Sir,how I can make her know me.'

  • 亚历克斯·黒 08-01

      "Nestor," said he, "son of Neleus, honour to the Achaean name, youask whence we come, and I will tell you. We come from Ithaca underNeritum, and the matter about which I would speak is of private notpublic import. I seek news of my unhappy father Ulysses, who is saidto have sacked the town of Troy in company with yourself. We know whatfate befell each one of the other heroes who fought at Troy, but asregards Ulysses heaven has hidden from us the knowledge even that heis dead at all, for no one can certify us in what place he perished,nor say whether he fell in battle on the mainland, or was lost atsea amid the waves of Amphitrite. Therefore I am suppliant at yourknees, if haply you may be pleased to tell me of his melancholy end,whether you saw it with your own eyes, or heard it from some othertraveller, for he was a man born to trouble. Do not soften thingsout of any pity for me, but tell me in all plainness exactly whatyou saw. If my brave father Ulysses ever did you loyal service, eitherby word or deed, when you Achaeans were harassed among the Trojans,bear it in mind now as in my favour and tell me truly all."

  • 甘珠尔 07-31

       "My dear, will you be so kind as to show me the house of kingAlcinous? I am an unfortunate foreigner in distress, and do not knowone in your town and country."

  • 劳恩斯 07-29

    {  Then he said to Melanthius the goatherd, "Look sharp, light a firein the court, and set a seat hard by with a sheep skin on it; bring usalso a large ball of lard, from what they have in the house. Let uswarm the bow and grease it we will then make trial of it again, andbring the contest to an end."

  • 童健 07-29

      "Old man," answered Ulysses, "she knows already, so you need nottrouble about that." On this he took his seat, and the sons ofDolius gathered round Ulysses to give him greeting and embrace him oneafter the other; then they took their seats in due order near Doliustheir father.

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