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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:麦柯斯 大小:Atj7iVl611744KB 下载:PWAz5XT052306次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:CeQY3lrT56581条
日期:2020-08-10 21:10:48
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李刚

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "'Is there no way,' said I, 'of escaping Charybdis, and at thesame time keeping Scylla off when she is trying to harm my men?'
2.  Telemachus saw her long before any one else did. He was sittingmoodily among the suitors thinking about his brave father, and howhe would send them flying out of the house, if he were to come tohis own again and be honoured as in days gone by. Thus brooding ashe sat among them, he caught sight of Minerva and went straight to thegate, for he was vexed that a stranger should be kept waiting foradmittance. He took her right hand in his own, and bade her give himher spear. "Welcome," said he, "to our house, and when you havepartaken of food you shall tell us what you have come for."
3.  On this, as he passed, he gave Ulysses a kick on the hip out of purewantonness, but Ulysses stood firm, and did not budge from the path.For a moment he doubted whether or no to fly at Melanthius and killhim with his staff, or fling him to the ground and beat his brainsout; he resolved, however, to endure it and keep himself in check, butthe swineherd looked straight at Melanthius and rebuked him, liftingup his hands and praying to heaven as he did so.
4.  "Madam," answered Ulysses, "it is such a long time ago that I canhardly say. Twenty years are come and gone since he left my home,and went elsewhither; but I will tell you as well as I canrecollect. Ulysses wore a mantle of purple wool, double lined, andit was fastened by a gold brooch with two catches for the pin. Onthe face of this there was a device that showed a dog holding aspotted fawn between his fore paws, and watching it as it laypanting upon the ground. Every one marvelled at the way in which thesethings had been done in gold, the dog looking at the fawn, andstrangling it, while the fawn was struggling convulsively to escape.As for the shirt that he wore next his skin, it was so soft that itfitted him like the skin of an onion, and glistened in the sunlight tothe admiration of all the women who beheld it. Furthermore I say,and lay my saying to your heart, that I do not know whether Ulysseswore these clothes when he left home, or whether one of his companionshad given them to him while he was on his voyage; or possibly some oneat whose house he was staying made him a present of them, for he was aman of many friends and had few equals among the Achaeans. I myselfgave him a sword of bronze and a beautiful purple mantle, doublelined, with a shirt that went down to his feet, and I sent him onboard his ship with every mark of honour. He had a servant with him, alittle older than himself, and I can tell you what he was like; hisshoulders were hunched, he was dark, and he had thick curly hair.His name was Eurybates, and Ulysses treated him with greaterfamiliarity than he did any of the others, as being the mostlike-minded with himself."
5.  "The man is no fool," answered Penelope, "it would very likely be ashe says, for there are no such abominable people in the whole world asthese men are."
6.  "They all swore as I bade them, and when they had completed theiroath we made the ship fast in a harbour that was near a stream offresh water, and the men went ashore and cooked their suppers. As soonas they had had enough to eat and drink, they began talking abouttheir poor comrades whom Scylla had snatched up and eaten; this setthem weeping and they went on crying till they fell off into a soundsleep.

计划指导

1.  Minerva answered, "Never mind about him, I sent him that he might bewell spoken of for having gone. He is in no sort of difficulty, but isstaying quite comfortably with Menelaus, and is surrounded withabundance of every kind. The suitors have put out to sea and are lyingin wait for him, for they mean to kill him before he can get home. Ido not much think they will succeed, but rather that some of those whoare now eating up your estate will first find a grave themselves."
2.  When he had thus spoken, he said to his son Mercury, "Mercury, youare our messenger, go therefore and tell Calypso we have decreedthat poor Ulysses is to return home. He is to be convoyed neither bygods nor men, but after a perilous voyage of twenty days upon a rafthe is to reach fertile Scheria, the land of the Phaeacians, who arenear of kin to the gods, and will honour him as though he were oneof ourselves. They will send him in a ship to his own country, andwill give him more bronze and gold and raiment than he would havebrought back from Troy, if he had had had all his prize money andhad got home without disaster. This is how we have settled that heshall return to his country and his friends."
3.  The bard inspired of heaven took up the story at the point wheresome of the Argives set fire to their tents and sailed away whileothers, hidden within the horse, were waiting with Ulysses in theTrojan place of assembly. For the Trojans themselves had drawn thehorse into their fortress, and it stood there while they sat incouncil round it, and were in three minds as to what they should do.Some were for breaking it up then and there; others would have itdragged to the top of the rock on which the fortress stood, and thenthrown down the precipice; while yet others were for letting it remainas an offering and propitiation for the gods. And this was how theysettled it in the end, for the city was doomed when it took in thathorse, within which were all the bravest of the Argives waiting tobring death and destruction on the Trojans. Anon he sang how thesons of the Achaeans issued from the horse, and sacked the town,breaking out from their ambuscade. He sang how they over ran thecity hither and thither and ravaged it, and how Ulysses went raginglike Mars along with Menelaus to the house of Deiphobus. It wasthere that the fight raged most furiously, nevertheless by Minerva'shelp he was victorious.
4.  Telemachus gave him no heed, but sat silently watching his father,expecting every moment that he would begin his attack upon thesuitors.
5.  "My mother answered, 'Your wife still remains in your house, but sheis in great distress of mind and spends her whole time in tears bothnight and day. No one as yet has got possession of your fine property,and Telemachus still holds your lands undisturbed. He has to entertainlargely, as of course he must, considering his position as amagistrate, and how every one invites him; your father remains athis old place in the country and never goes near the town. He has nocomfortable bed nor bedding; in the winter he sleeps on the floor infront of the fire with the men and goes about all in rags, but insummer, when the warm weather comes on again, he lies out in thevineyard on a bed of vine leaves thrown anyhow upon the ground. Hegrieves continually about your never having come home, and suffersmore and more as he grows older. As for my own end it was in thiswise: heaven did not take me swiftly and painlessly in my own house,nor was I attacked by any illness such as those that generally wearpeople out and kill them, but my longing to know what you were doingand the force of my affection for you- this it was that was thedeath of me.'
6.  When Laodamas heard this he made his way into the middle of thecrowd and said to Ulysses, "I hope, Sir, that you will enteryourself for some one or other of our competitions if you areskilled in any of them- and you must have gone in for many a onebefore now. There is nothing that does any one so much credit allhis life long as the showing himself a proper man with his hands andfeet. Have a try therefore at something, and banish all sorrow fromyour mind. Your return home will not be long delayed, for the shipis already drawn into the water, and the crew is found."

推荐功能

1.  "I will say what I think will be best," answered Ulysses. "Firstwash and put your shirts on; tell the maids also to go to their ownroom and dress; Phemius shall then strike up a dance tune on his lyre,so that if people outside hear, or any of the neighbours, or someone going along the street happens to notice it, they may thinkthere is a wedding in the house, and no rumours about the death of thesuitors will get about in the town, before we can escape to thewoods upon my own land. Once there, we will settle which of thecourses heaven vouchsafes us shall seem wisest."
2.  Ulysses answered, "Madam, I have foresworn rugs and blankets fromthe day that I left the snowy ranges of Crete to go on shipboard. Iwill lie as I have lain on many a sleepless night hitherto. Nightafter night have I passed in any rough sleeping place, and waitedfor morning. Nor, again, do I like having my feet washed; I shallnot let any of the young hussies about your house touch my feet;but, if you have any old and respectable woman who has gone through asmuch trouble as I have, I will allow her to wash them."
3.  "Madam;" answered Ulysses, "who on the face of the whole earth candare to chide with you? Your fame reaches the firmament of heavenitself; you are like some blameless king, who upholds righteousness,as the monarch over a great and valiant nation: the earth yields itswheat and barley, the trees are loaded with fruit, the ewes bringforth lambs, and the sea abounds with fish by reason of his virtues,and his people do good deeds under him. Nevertheless, as I sit here inyour house, ask me some other question and do not seek to know my raceand family, or you will recall memories that will yet more increase mysorrow. I am full of heaviness, but I ought not to sit weeping andwailing in another person's house, nor is it well to be thusgrieving continually. I shall have one of the servants or evenyourself complaining of me, and saying that my eyes swim with tearsbecause I am heavy with wine."
4.  "Father Jove," he cried, "and all you other blessed gods who livefor ever, come here and see the ridiculous and disgraceful sightthat I will show you. Jove's daughter Venus is always dishonouringme because I am lame. She is in love with Mars, who is handsome andclean built, whereas I am a cripple- but my parents are to blame forthat, not I; they ought never to have begotten me. Come and see thepair together asleep on my bed. It makes me furious to look at them.They are very fond of one another, but I do not think they will liethere longer than they can help, nor do I think that they will sleepmuch; there, however, they shall stay till her father has repaid methe sum I gave him for his baggage of a daughter, who is fair butnot honest."
5.   As he spoke he lashed his horses and they started off at fullspeed through the town towards the open country. They swayed theyoke upon their necks and travelled the whole day long till the sunset and darkness was over all the land. Then they reached Pherae,where Diocles lived who was son of Ortilochus, the son of Alpheus.There they passed the night and were treated hospitably. When thechild of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, they again yoked theirhorses and their places in the chariot. They drove out through theinner gateway and under the echoing gatehouse of the outer court. ThenPisistratus lashed his horses on and they flew forward nothingloath; ere long they came to Pylos, and then Telemachus said:
6.  "I then gave him some more; three times did I fill the bowl for him,and three times did he drain it without thought or heed; then, whenI saw that the wine had got into his head, I said to him asplausibly as I could: 'Cyclops, you ask my name and I will tell ityou; give me, therefore, the present you promised me; my name isNoman; this is what my father and mother and my friends have alwayscalled me.'

应用

1.  Thus did they converse. Meanwhile Eurynome and the nurse tooktorches and made the bed ready with soft coverlets; as soon as theyhad laid them, the nurse went back into the house to go to her rest,leaving the bed chamber woman Eurynome to show Ulysses and Penelope tobed by torch light. When she had conducted them to their room she wentback, and they then came joyfully to the rites of their own old bed.Telemachus, Philoetius, and the swineherd now left off dancing, andmade the women leave off also. They then laid themselves down to sleepin the cloisters.
2.  He led the way as he spoke, and Minerva followed him. When they werewithin he took her spear and set it in the spear- stand against astrong bearing-post along with the many other spears of his unhappyfather, and he conducted her to a richly decorated seat under which hethrew a cloth of damask. There was a footstool also for her feet,and he set another seat near her for himself, away from the suitors,that she might not be annoyed while eating by their noise andinsolence, and that he might ask her more freely about his father.
3.  On this Ulysses began to move off, and said, "Your looks, my finesir, are better than your breeding; if you were in your own houseyou would not spare a poor man so much as a pinch of salt, forthough you are in another man's, and surrounded with abundance, youcannot find it in you to give him even a piece of bread."
4、  "Queen Penelope," answered Eurymachus, "we do not suppose thatthis man will take you away with him; it is impossible; but we areafraid lest some of the baser sort, men or women among the Achaeans,should go gossiping about and say, 'These suitors are a feeble folk;they are paying court to the wife of a brave man whose bow not oneof them was able to string, and yet a beggarly tramp who came to thehouse strung it at once and sent an arrow through the iron.' This iswhat will be said, and it will be a scandal against us."
5、  "Now," said he, "that our guests have done their dinner, it willbe best to ask them who they are. Who, then, sir strangers, are you,and from what port have you sailed? Are you traders? or do you sailthe seas as rovers with your hand against every man, and every man'shand against you?"

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网友评论(27blRyyE94780))

  • 郑乙英 08-09

      "'Of these two rocks the one reaches heaven and its peak is lostin a dark cloud. This never leaves it, so that the top is neverclear not even in summer and early autumn. No man though he had twentyhands and twenty feet could get a foothold on it and climb it, forit runs sheer up, as smooth as though it had been polished. In themiddle of it there is a large cavern, looking West and turnedtowards Erebus; you must take your ship this way, but the cave is sohigh up that not even the stoutest archer could send an arrow into it.Inside it Scylla sits and yelps with a voice that you might take to bethat of a young hound, but in truth she is a dreadful monster and noone- not even a god- could face her without being terror-struck. Shehas twelve mis-shapen feet, and six necks of the most prodigiouslength; and at the end of each neck she has a frightful head withthree rows of teeth in each, all set very close together, so that theywould crunch any one to death in a moment, and she sits deep withinher shady cell thrusting out her heads and peering all round the rock,fishing for dolphins or dogfish or any larger monster that she cancatch, of the thousands with which Amphitrite teems. No ship everyet got past her without losing some men, for she shoots out all herheads at once, and carries off a man in each mouth.

  • 鲍罗廷 08-09

      As spoke he took Telemachus' spear, whereon he crossed the stonethreshold and came inside. Ulysses rose from his seat to give himplace as he entered, but Telemachus checked him; "Sit down, stranger."said he, "I can easily find another seat, and there is one here whowill lay it for me."

  • 韩飞 08-09

       Thus did they converse in the house of Hades deep down within thebowels of the earth. Meanwhile Ulysses and the others passed out ofthe town and soon reached the fair and well-tilled farm of Laertes,which he had reclaimed with infinite labour. Here was his house,with a lean-to running all round it, where the slaves who worked forhim slept and sat and ate, while inside the house there was an oldSicel woman, who looked after him in this his country-farm. WhenUlysses got there, he said to his son and to the other two:

  • 宋家传 08-09

      "'When you have reached this spot, as I now tell you, dig a trench acubit or so in length, breadth, and depth, and pour into it as adrink-offering to all the dead, first, honey mixed with milk, thenwine, and in the third place water-sprinkling white barley meal overthe whole. Moreover you must offer many prayers to the poor feebleghosts, and promise them that when you get back to Ithaca you willsacrifice a barren heifer to them, the best you have, and will loadthe pyre with good things. More particularly you must promise thatTeiresias shall have a black sheep all to himself, the finest in allyour flocks.

  • 孟妍贾 08-08

    {  And Jove answered, "My child, why should you ask me? Was it not byyour own arrangement that Ulysses came home and took his revengeupon the suitors? Do whatever you like, but I will tell you what Ithink will be most reasonable arrangement. Now that Ulysses isrevenged, let them swear to a solemn covenant, in virtue of which heshall continue to rule, while we cause the others to forgive andforget the massacre of their sons and brothers. Let them then allbecome friends as heretofore, and let peace and plenty reign."

  • 江头 08-07

      When he was in this plight, Ino daughter of Cadmus, also calledLeucothea, saw him. She had formerly been a mere mortal, but hadbeen since raised to the rank of a marine goddess. Seeing in whatgreat distress Ulysses now was, she had compassion upon him, and,rising like a sea-gull from the waves, took her seat upon the raft.}

  • 比莎士比亚 08-07

      "Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, so you would start home to yourown land at once? Good luck go with you, but if you could only knowhow much suffering is in store for you before you get back to your owncountry, you would stay where you are, keep house along with me, andlet me make you immortal, no matter how anxious you may be to see thiswife of yours, of whom you are thinking all the time day after day;yet I flatter myself that at am no whit less tall or well-looking thanshe is, for it is not to be expected that a mortal woman shouldcompare in beauty with an immortal."

  • 杨万国 08-07

      Then Amphinomus drew his sword and made straight at Ulysses to tryand get him away from the door; but Telemachus was too quick forhim, and struck him from behind; the spear caught him between theshoulders and went right through his chest, so that he fell heavily tothe ground and struck the earth with his forehead. Then Telemachussprang away from him, leaving his spear still in the body, for hefeared that if he stayed to draw it out, some one of the Achaeansmight come up and hack at him with his sword, or knock him down, so heset off at a run, and immediately was at his father's side. Then hesaid:

  • 刘玉才 08-06

       "'We went,' said he, as you told us, through the forest, and inthe middle of it there was a fine house built with cut stones in aplace that could be seen from far. There we found a woman, or else shewas a goddess, working at her loom and singing sweetly; so the menshouted to her and called her, whereon she at once came down, openedthe door, and invited us in. The others did not suspect any mischiefso they followed her into the house, but I stayed where I was, for Ithought there might be some treachery. From that moment I saw themno more, for not one of them ever came out, though I sat a long timewatching for them.'

  • 方彦富 08-04

    {  Thus spoke the daughter of Jove, and they obeyed her saying. Menservants poured water over the hands of the guests, while pages filledthe mixing-bowls with wine and water, and handed it round after givingevery man his drink-offering; then they threw the tongues of thevictims into the fire, and stood up to make their drink-offerings.When they had made their offerings and had drunk each as much as hewas minded, Minerva and Telemachus were forgoing on board theirship, but Nestor caught them up at once and stayed them.

  • 杨丞琳 08-04

      "My dear, will you be so kind as to show me the house of kingAlcinous? I am an unfortunate foreigner in distress, and do not knowone in your town and country."

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