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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:李君蕾 大小:aPBdMBUQ25450KB 下载:cofu0YQf29496次
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日期:2020-08-04 19:18:09
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "'Is there no way,' said I, 'of escaping Charybdis, and at thesame time keeping Scylla off when she is trying to harm my men?'
2.  "My dear," answered Ulysses, "why should you press me to tell you?Still, I will not conceal it from you, though you will not like BOOKit. I do not like it myself, for Teiresias bade me travel far andwide, carrying an oar, till I came to a country where the peoplehave never heard of the sea, and do not even mix salt with their food.They know nothing about ships, nor oars that are as the wings of aship. He gave me this certain token which I will not hide from you. Hesaid that a wayfarer should meet me and ask me whether it was awinnowing shovel that I had on my shoulder. On this, I was to fix myoar in the ground and sacrifice a ram, a bull, and a boar toNeptune; after which I was to go home and offer hecatombs to all thegods in heaven, one after the other. As for myself, he said that deathshould come to me from the sea, and that my life should ebb awayvery gently when I was full of years and peace of mind, and mypeople should bless me. All this, he said, should surely come topass."
3.  Then Telemachus said, "Eurymachus, and you other suitors, I shallsay no more, and entreat you no further, for the gods and the peopleof Ithaca now know my story. Give me, then, a ship and a crew oftwenty men to take me hither and thither, and I will go to Spartaand to Pylos in quest of my father who has so long been missing.Some one may tell me something, or (and people often hear things inthis way) some heaven-sent message may direct me. If I can hear of himas alive and on his way home I will put up with the waste yousuitors will make for yet another twelve months. If on the otherhand I hear of his death, I will return at once, celebrate his funeralrites with all due pomp, build a barrow to his memory, and make mymother marry again."
4.  But Minerva would not let the suitors for one moment cease theirinsolence, for she wanted Ulysses to become even more bitter againstthem; she therefore set Eurymachus son of Polybus on to gibe at him,which made the others laugh. "Listen to me," said he, "you suitorsof Queen Penelope, that I may speak even as I am minded. It is not fornothing that this man has come to the house of Ulysses; I believethe light has not been coming from the torches, but from his own head-for his hair is all gone, every bit of it."
5.  Presently the sun set and darkness was over all the land. The vesselmade a quick pass sage to Pheae and thence on to Elis, where theEpeans rule. Telemachus then headed her for the flying islands,wondering within himself whether he should escape death or should betaken prisoner.
6.  And Jove answered, "What, O Lord of the Earthquake, are youtalking about? The gods are by no means wanting in respect for you. Itwould be monstrous were they to insult one so old and honoured asyou are. As regards mortals, however, if any of them is indulging ininsolence and treating you disrespectfully, it will always rest withyourself to deal with him as you may think proper, so do just as youplease."

计划指导

1.  Thus did he speak, and they did even as he had said, and yoked thefleet horses to the chariot. The housekeeper packed them up aprovision of bread, wine, and sweetmeats fit for the sons ofprinces. Then Telemachus got into the chariot, while Pisistratusgathered up the reins and took his seat beside him. He lashed thehorses on and they flew forward nothing loth into the open country,leaving the high citadel of Pylos behind them. All that day did theytravel, swaying the yoke upon their necks till the sun went down anddarkness was over all the land. Then they reached Pherae where Diocleslived, who was son to Ortilochus and grandson to Alpheus. Here theypassed the night and Diocles entertained them hospitably. When thechild of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn; appeared, they again yoked theirhorses and drove out through the gateway under the echoinggatehouse. Pisistratus lashed the horses on and they flew forwardnothing loth; presently they came to the corn lands Of the opencountry, and in the course of time completed their journey, so welldid their steeds take them.
2.  "Telemachus," said she, addressing her son, "I fear you are nolonger so discreet and well conducted as you used to be. When you wereyounger you had a greater sense of propriety; now, however, that youare grown up, though a stranger to look at you would take you forthe son of a well-to-do father as far as size and good looks go,your conduct is by no means what it should be. What is all thisdisturbance that has been going on, and how came you to allow astranger to be so disgracefully ill-treated? What would havehappened if he had suffered serious injury while a suppliant in ourhouse? Surely this would have been very discreditable to you."
3.  So saying she bound on her glittering golden sandals,imperishable, with which she can fly like the wind over land or sea;she grasped the redoubtable bronze-shod spear, so stout and sturdy andstrong, wherewith she quells the ranks of heroes who have displeasedher, and down she darted from the topmost summits of Olympus,whereon forthwith she was in Ithaca, at the gateway of Ulysses' house,disguised as a visitor, Mentes, chief of the Taphians, and she helda bronze spear in her hand. There she found the lordly suitorsseated on hides of the oxen which they had killed and eaten, andplaying draughts in front of the house. Men-servants and pages werebustling about to wait upon them, some mixing wine with water in themixing-bowls, some cleaning down the tables with wet sponges andlaying them out again, and some cutting up great quantities of meat.
4.  BOOK VIII.
5.  "Sit where you are, and eat your victuals in silence, or be offelsewhere," shouted Antinous. "If you say more I will have you draggedhand and foot through the courts, and the servants shall flay youalive."
6.  "Telemachus, insolent braggart that you are, how dare you try tothrow the blame upon us suitors? It is your mother's fault not ours,for she is a very artful woman. This three years past, and close onfour, she has been driving us out of our minds, by encouraging eachone of us, and sending him messages without meaning one word of whatshe says. And then there was that other trick she played us. She setup a great tambour frame in her room, and began to work on an enormouspiece of fine needlework. 'Sweet hearts,' said she, 'Ulysses is indeeddead, still do not press me to marry again immediately, wait- for Iwould not have skill in needlework perish unrecorded- till I havecompleted a pall for the hero Laertes, to be in readiness againstthe time when death shall take him. He is very rich, and the womenof the place will talk if he is laid out without a pall.'

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1.  "The cruel wretch vouchsafed me not one word of answer, but with asudden clutch he gripped up two of my men at once and dashed them downupon the ground as though they had been puppies. Their brains wereshed upon the ground, and the earth was wet with their blood. Thenhe tore them limb from limb and supped upon them. He gobbled them uplike a lion in the wilderness, flesh, bones, marrow, and entrails,without leaving anything uneaten. As for us, we wept and lifted up ourhands to heaven on seeing such a horrid sight, for we did not knowwhat else to do; but when the Cyclops had filled his huge paunch,and had washed down his meal of human flesh with a drink of neat milk,he stretched himself full length upon the ground among his sheep,and went to sleep. I was at first inclined to seize my sword, draw it,and drive it into his vitals, but I reflected that if I did weshould all certainly be lost, for we should never be able to shift thestone which the monster had put in front of the door. So we stayedsobbing and sighing where we were till morning came.
2.  Laertes answered, "Would, by Father Jove, Minerva, and Apollo,that I were the man I was when I ruled among the Cephallenians, andtook Nericum, that strong fortress on the foreland. If I were stillwhat I then was and had been in our house yesterday with my armour on,I should have been able to stand by you and help you against thesuitors. I should have killed a great many of them, and you would haverejoiced to see it."
3.  "'Strangers, who are you? Where do sail from? Are you traders, or doyou sail the as rovers, with your hands against every man, and everyman's hand against you?'
4.  "'So far so good,' said she, when I had ended my story, 'and now payattention to what I am about to tell you- heaven itself, indeed,will recall it to your recollection. First you will come to the Sirenswho enchant all who come near them. If any one unwarily draws in tooclose and hears the singing of the Sirens, his wife and childrenwill never welcome him home again, for they sit in a green field andwarble him to death with the sweetness of their song. There is a greatheap of dead men's bones lying all around, with the flesh stillrotting off them. Therefore pass these Sirens by, and stop yourmen's ears with wax that none of them may hear; but if you like youcan listen yourself, for you may get the men to bind you as youstand upright on a cross-piece half way up the mast, and they mustlash the rope's ends to the mast itself, that you may have thepleasure of listening. If you beg and pray the men to unloose you,then they must bind you faster.
5.   On this pale fear seized every one; they were so frightened thattheir arms dropped from their hands and fell upon the ground at thesound of the goddess's voice, and they fled back to the city for theirlives. But Ulysses gave a great cry, and gathering himself togetherswooped down like a soaring eagle. Then the son of Saturn sent athunderbolt of fire that fell just in front of Minerva, so she said toUlysses, "Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, stop this warful strife, orJove will be angry with you."
6.  On this he handed them a piece of fat roast loin, which had been setnear him as being a prime part, and they laid their hands on thegood things that were before them; as soon as they had had enough toeat and drink, Telemachus said to the son of Nestor, with his headso close that no one might hear, "Look, Pisistratus, man after myown heart, see the gleam of bronze and gold- of amber, ivory, andsilver. Everything is so splendid that it is like seeing the palace ofOlympian Jove. I am lost in admiration."

应用

1.  "Thus, then, did we sit and hold sad talk with one another, I on theone side of the trench with my sword held over the blood, and theghost of my comrade saying all this to me from the other side. Thencame the ghost of my dead mother Anticlea, daughter to Autolycus. Ihad left her alive when I set out for Troy and was moved to tears whenI saw her, but even so, for all my sorrow I would not let her comenear the blood till I had asked my questions of Teiresias.
2.  When he had said this, he seated himself beside Alcinous. Supper wasthen served, and the wine was mixed for drinking. A servant led in thefavourite bard Demodocus, and set him in the midst of the company,near one of the bearing-posts supporting the cloister, that he mightlean against it. Then Ulysses cut off a piece of roast pork withplenty of fat (for there was abundance left on the joint) and saidto a servant, "Take this piece of pork over to Demodocus and tellhim to eat it; for all the pain his lays may cause me I will salutehim none the less; bards are honoured and respected throughout theworld, for the muse teaches them their songs and loves them."
3.  Then Telemachus spoke, "Shameless," he cried, "and insolent suitors,let us feast at our pleasure now, and let there be no brawling, for itis a rare thing to hear a man with such a divine voice as Phemius has;but in the morning meet me in full assembly that I may give you formalnotice to depart, and feast at one another's houses, turn and turnabout, at your own cost. If on the other hand you choose to persist inspunging upon one man, heaven help me, but Jove shall reckon withyou in full, and when you fall in my father's house there shall beno man to avenge you."
4、  Leiodes then caught the knees of Ulysses and said, "Ulysses Ibeseech you have mercy upon me and spare me. I never wronged any ofthe women in your house either in word or deed, and I tried to stopthe others. I saw them, but they would not listen, and now they arepaying for their folly. I was their sacrificing priest; if you killme, I shall die without having done anything to deserve it, andshall have got no thanks for all the good that I did."
5、  Presently the sun set and it became dark, whereon the pair retiredinto the inner part of the cave and went to bed.

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  • 余世明 08-03

      And Jove said, "My child, what are you talking about? How can Iforget Ulysses than whom there is no more capable man on earth, normore liberal in his offerings to the immortal gods that live inheaven? Bear in mind, however, that Neptune is still furious withUlysses for having blinded an eye of Polyphemus king of theCyclopes. Polyphemus is son to Neptune by the nymph Thoosa, daughterto the sea-king Phorcys; therefore though he will not kill Ulyssesoutright, he torments him by preventing him from getting home.Still, let us lay our heads together and see how we can help him toreturn; Neptune will then be pacified, for if we are all of a mindhe can hardly stand out against us."

  • 汤继颖 08-03

      Thus spoke Minerva, and Ulysses obeyed her gladly. Then Minervaassumed the form and voice of Mentor, and presently made a covenant ofpeace between the two contending parties.

  • 张天赐 08-03

       This was what they said, but they did not know what it was thathad been happening. The upper servant Eurynome washed and anointedUlysses in his own house and gave him a shirt and cloak, while Minervamade him look taller and stronger than before; she also made thehair grow thick on the top of his head, and flow down in curls likehyacinth blossoms; she glorified him about the head and shoulders justas a skilful workman who has studied art of all kinds under Vulcanor Minerva- and his work is full of beauty- enriches a piece of silverplate by gilding it. He came from the bath looking like one of theimmortals, and sat down opposite his wife on the seat he had left. "Mydear," said he, "heaven has endowed you with a heart more unyieldingthan woman ever yet had. No other woman could bear to keep away fromher husband when he had come back to her after twenty years ofabsence, and after having gone through so much. But come, nurse, get abed ready for me; I will sleep alone, for this woman has a heart ashard as iron."

  • 张建宗 08-03

      BOOK XIII.

  • 阿巴克斯 08-02

    {  "They called her and she came down, unfastened the door, and badethem enter. They, thinking no evil, followed her, all exceptEurylochus, who suspected mischief and stayed outside. When she hadgot them into her house, she set them upon benches and seats and mixedthem a mess with cheese, honey, meal, and Pramnian but she druggedit with wicked poisons to make them forget their homes, and whenthey had drunk she turned them into pigs by a stroke of her wand,and shut them up in her pigsties. They were like pigs-head, hair,and all, and they grunted just as pigs do; but their senses were thesame as before, and they remembered everything.

  • 林登 08-01

      Minerva now made the suitors fall to laughing immoderately, andset their wits wandering; but they were laughing with a forcedlaughter. Their meat became smeared with blood; their eyes filled withtears, and their hearts were heavy with forebodings. Theoclymenussaw this and said, "Unhappy men, what is it that ails you? There isa shroud of darkness drawn over you from head to foot, your cheeks arewet with tears; the air is alive with wailing voices; the walls androof-beams drip blood; the gate of the cloisters and the courtbeyond them are full of ghosts trooping down into the night of hell;the sun is blotted out of heaven, and a blighting gloom is over allthe land."}

  • 袁英明 08-01

      "They sang these words most musically, and as I longed to hearthem further I made by frowning to my men that they should set mefree; but they quickened their stroke, and Eurylochus and Perimedesbound me with still stronger bonds till we had got out of hearing ofthe Sirens' voices. Then my men took the wax from their ears andunbound me.

  • 赵建平 08-01

      "Pray do not scold her," replied Ulysses; "she is not to blame.She did tell me to follow along with the maids, but I was ashamedand afraid, for I thought you might perhaps be displeased if you sawme. Every human being is sometimes a little suspicious and irritable."

  • 高瑞欣 07-31

       The pair went into the outer court as fast as they could, and satdown by Jove's great altar, looking fearfully round, and stillexpecting that they would be killed. Then Ulysses searched the wholecourt carefully over, to see if anyone had managed to hide himself andwas still living, but he found them all lying in the dust andweltering in their blood. They were like fishes which fishermen havenetted out of the sea, and thrown upon the beach to lie gasping forwater till the heat of the sun makes an end of them. Even so werethe suitors lying all huddled up one against the other.

  • 应定国 07-29

    {  "Telemachus," said one youngster, "means to be the death of us; Isuppose he thinks he can bring friends to help him from Pylos, oragain from Sparta, where he seems bent on going. Or will he go toEphyra as well, for poison to put in our wine and kill us?"

  • 安雅堂 07-29

      So saying she bound on her glittering golden sandals,imperishable, with which she can fly like the wind over land or sea;she grasped the redoubtable bronze-shod spear, so stout and sturdy andstrong, wherewith she quells the ranks of heroes who have displeasedher, and down she darted from the topmost summits of Olympus,whereon forthwith she was in Ithaca, at the gateway of Ulysses' house,disguised as a visitor, Mentes, chief of the Taphians, and she helda bronze spear in her hand. There she found the lordly suitorsseated on hides of the oxen which they had killed and eaten, andplaying draughts in front of the house. Men-servants and pages werebustling about to wait upon them, some mixing wine with water in themixing-bowls, some cleaning down the tables with wet sponges andlaying them out again, and some cutting up great quantities of meat.

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