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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:李兰芳 大小:B6qjbUbX70571KB 下载:tdaXT60t36502次
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日期:2020-08-09 08:22:30
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  On this he broke up the assembly, and every man went back to his ownabode, while the suitors returned to the house of Ulysses.
2.  "'Son of Atreus,' he answered, 'why ask me? You had better notknow what I can tell you, for your eyes will surely fill when you haveheard my story. Many of those about whom you ask are dead and gone,but many still remain, and only two of the chief men among theAchaeans perished during their return home. As for what happened onthe field of battle- you were there yourself. A third Achaean leaderis still at sea, alive, but hindered from returning. Ajax was wrecked,for Neptune drove him on to the great rocks of Gyrae; nevertheless, helet him get safe out of the water, and in spite of all Minerva'shatred he would have escaped death, if he had not ruined himself byboasting. He said the gods could not drown him even though they hadtried to do so, and when Neptune heard this large talk, he seizedhis trident in his two brawny hands, and split the rock of Gyrae intwo pieces. The base remained where it was, but the part on which Ajaxwas sitting fell headlong into the sea and carried Ajax with it; so hedrank salt water and was drowned.
3.  "As soon as I got down to my ship and to the sea shore I rebukedeach one of the men separately, but we could see no way out of it, forthe cows were dead already. And indeed the gods began at once toshow signs and wonders among us, for the hides of the cattle crawledabout, and the joints upon the spits began to low like cows, and themeat, whether cooked or raw, kept on making a noise just as cows do.
4.  With this Telemachus dashed his staff to the ground and burst intotears. Every one was very sorry for him, but they all sat still and noone ventured to make him an angry answer, save only Antinous, whospoke thus:
5.  But Telemachus said, "Hush, do not answer him; Antinous has thebitterest tongue of all the suitors, and he makes the others worse."
6.  "Thus then were they shut up squealing, and Circe threw them someacorns and beech masts such as pigs eat, but Eurylochus hurried backto tell me about the sad fate of our comrades. He was so overcome withdismay that though he tried to speak he could find no words to doso; his eyes filled with tears and he could only sob and sigh, till atlast we forced his story out of him, and he told us what hadhappened to the others.

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1.  On this Telemachus came forward and said, "Sirs, are you mad? Canyou not carry your meat and your liquor decently? Some evil spirit haspossessed you. I do not wish to drive any of you away, but you havehad your suppers, and the sooner you all go home to bed the better."
2.  Telemachus answered, "Antinous, how can I drive the mother whobore me from my father's house? My father is abroad and we do not knowwhether he is alive or dead. It will be hard on me if I have to payIcarius the large sum which I must give him if I insist on sending hisdaughter back to him. Not only will he deal rigorously with me, butheaven will also punish me; for my mother when she leaves the housewill calf on the Erinyes to avenge her; besides, it would not be acreditable thing to do, and I will have nothing to say to it. If youchoose to take offence at this, leave the house and feast elsewhere atone another's houses at your own cost turn and turn about. If, onthe other hand, you elect to persist in spunging upon one man,heaven help me, but Jove shall reckon with you in full, and when youfall in my father's house there shall be no man to avenge you."
3.  "You say truly, my dear father," answered Telemachus, "and you shallsee, if you will, that I am in no mind to disgrace your family."
4.  "'Your brother and his ships escaped, for Juno protected him, butwhen he was just about to reach the high promontory of Malea, he wascaught by a heavy gale which carried him out to sea again sorelyagainst his will, and drove him to the foreland where Thyestes used todwell, but where Aegisthus was then living. By and by, however, itseemed as though he was to return safely after all, for the godsbacked the wind into its old quarter and they reached home; whereonAgamemnon kissed his native soil, and shed tears of joy at findinghimself in his own country.
5.  Every one approved of this, and then they went home to bed each inhis own abode. When the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn,appeared, they hurried down to the ship and brought their cauldronswith them. Alcinous went on board and saw everything so securelystowed under the ship's benches that nothing could break adrift andinjure the rowers. Then they went to the house of Alcinous to getdinner, and he sacrificed a bull for them in honour of Jove who is thelord of all. They set the steaks to grill and made an excellentdinner, after which the inspired bard, Demodocus, who was afavourite with every one, sang to them; but Ulysses kept on turninghis eyes towards the sun, as though to hasten his setting, for hewas longing to be on his way. As one who has been all day ploughinga fallow field with a couple of oxen keeps thinking about his supperand is glad when night comes that he may go and get it, for it isall his legs can do to carry him, even so did Ulysses rejoice when thesun went down, and he at once said to the Phaecians, addressinghimself more particularly to King Alcinous:
6.  "'So far so good,' said she, when I had ended my story, 'and now payattention to what I am about to tell you- heaven itself, indeed,will recall it to your recollection. First you will come to the Sirenswho enchant all who come near them. If any one unwarily draws in tooclose and hears the singing of the Sirens, his wife and childrenwill never welcome him home again, for they sit in a green field andwarble him to death with the sweetness of their song. There is a greatheap of dead men's bones lying all around, with the flesh stillrotting off them. Therefore pass these Sirens by, and stop yourmen's ears with wax that none of them may hear; but if you like youcan listen yourself, for you may get the men to bind you as youstand upright on a cross-piece half way up the mast, and they mustlash the rope's ends to the mast itself, that you may have thepleasure of listening. If you beg and pray the men to unloose you,then they must bind you faster.

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1.  "Then I tried to find some way of embracing my mother's ghost.Thrice I sprang towards her and tried to clasp her in my arms, buteach time she flitted from my embrace as it were a dream or phantom,and being touched to the quick I said to her, 'Mother, why do younot stay still when I would embrace you? If we could throw our armsaround one another we might find sad comfort in the sharing of oursorrows even in the house of Hades; does Proserpine want to lay astill further load of grief upon me by mocking me with a phantomonly?'
2.  There, then, they left him in very cruel bondage, and having puton their armour they closed the door behind them and went back to taketheir places by the side of Ulysses; whereon the four men stood in thecloister, fierce and full of fury; nevertheless, those who were in thebody of the court were still both brave and many. Then Jove's daughterMinerva came up to them, having assumed the voice and form ofMentor. Ulysses was glad when he saw her and said, "Mentor, lend meyour help, and forget not your old comrade, nor the many good turns hehas done you. Besides, you are my age-mate."
3.  The rest agreed, and Leiodes son of OEnops was the first to rise. Hewas sacrificial priest to the suitors, and sat in the corner nearthe mixing-bowl. He was the only man who hated their evil deeds andwas indignant with the others. He was now the first to take the bowand arrow, so he went on to the pavement to make his trial, but hecould not string the bow, for his hands were weak and unused to hardwork, they therefore soon grew tired, and he said to the suitors,"My friends, I cannot string it; let another have it; this bow shalltake the life and soul out of many a chief among us, for it isbetter to die than to live after having missed the prize that wehave so long striven for, and which has brought us so long together.Some one of us is even now hoping and praying that he may marryPenelope, but when he has seen this bow and tried it, let him wooand make bridal offerings to some other woman, and let Penelopemarry whoever makes her the best offer and whose lot it is to winher."
4.  "Wife," said he, turning to Queen Arete, "Go, fetch the best chestwe have, and put a clean cloak and shirt in it. Also, set a copperon the fire and heat some water; our guest will take a warm bath;see also to the careful packing of the presents that the noblePhaeacians have made him; he will thus better enjoy both his supperand the singing that will follow. I shall myself give him thisgolden goblet- which is of exquisite workmanship- that he may bereminded of me for the rest of his life whenever he makes adrink-offering to Jove, or to any of the gods."
5.   "My poor good man," said she, "why is Neptune so furiously angrywith you? He is giving you a great deal of trouble, but for all hisbluster he will not kill you. You seem to be a sensible person, dothen as I bid you; strip, leave your raft to drive before the wind,and swim to the Phaecian coast where better luck awaits you. And here,take my veil and put it round your chest; it is enchanted, and you cancome to no harm so long as you wear it. As soon as you touch land takeit off, throw it back as far as you can into the sea, and then go awayagain." With these words she took off her veil and gave it him. Thenshe dived down again like a sea-gull and vanished beneath the darkblue waters.
6.  "'What ails you, Polyphemus,' said they, 'that you make such anoise, breaking the stillness of the night, and preventing us frombeing able to sleep? Surely no man is carrying off your sheep?Surely no man is trying to kill you either by fraud or by force?

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1.  "Thus spoke Proteus, and I was broken hearted as I heard him. Isat down upon the sands and wept; I felt as though I could no longerbear to live nor look upon the light of the sun. Presently, when I hadhad my fill of weeping and writhing upon the ground, the old man ofthe sea said, 'Son of Atreus, do not waste any more time in cryingso bitterly; it can do no manner of good; find your way home as fastas ever you can, for Aegisthus be still alive, and even though Oresteshas beforehand with you in kilting him, you may yet come in for hisfuneral.'
2.  "Ulysses," said he, "now that you have reached my house I doubtnot you will get home without further misadventure no matter howmuch you have suffered in the past. To you others, however, who comehere night after night to drink my choicest wine and listen to mybard, I would insist as follows. Our guest has already packed up theclothes, wrought gold, and other valuables which you have broughtfor his acceptance; let us now, therefore, present him further, eachone of us, with a large tripod and a cauldron. We will recoupourselves by the levy of a general rate; for private individualscannot be expected to bear the burden of such a handsome present."
3.  "Stranger," replied Alcinous, "I am not the kind of man to get angryabout nothing; it is always better to be reasonable; but by FatherJove, Minerva, and Apollo, now that I see what kind of person you are,and how much you think as I do, I wish you would stay here, marry mydaughter, and become my son-in-law. If you will stay I will give you ahouse and an estate, but no one (heaven forbid) shall keep you hereagainst your own wish, and that you may be sure of this I willattend to-morrow to the matter of your escort. You can sleep duringthe whole voyage if you like, and the men shall sail you over smoothwaters either to your own home, or wherever you please, even though itbe a long way further off than Euboea, which those of my people whosaw it when they took yellow-haired Rhadamanthus to see Tityus the sonof Gaia, tell me is the furthest of any place- and yet they did thewhole voyage in a single day without distressing themselves, andcame back again afterwards. You will thus see how much my shipsexcel all others, and what magnificent oarsmen my sailors are."
4、  "'Then,' said they, 'if no man is attacking you, you must be ill;when Jove makes people ill, there is no help for it, and you hadbetter pray to your father Neptune.'
5、  "'Now there was a watchman whom Aegisthus kept always on thewatch, and to whom he had promised two talents of gold. This man hadbeen looking out for a whole year to make sure that Agamemnon didnot give him the slip and prepare war; when, therefore, this man sawAgamemnon go by, he went and told Aegisthus who at once began to lay aplot for him. He picked twenty of his bravest warriors and placed themin ambuscade on one side the cloister, while on the opposite side heprepared a banquet. Then he sent his chariots and horsemen toAgamemnon, and invited him to the feast, but he meant foul play. Hegot him there, all unsuspicious of the doom that was awaiting him, andkilled him when the banquet was over as though he were butchering anox in the shambles; not one of Agamemnon's followers was left alive,nor yet one of Aegisthus', but they were all killed there in thecloisters.'

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  • 曹宝安 08-08

      And Jove answered, "What, O Lord of the Earthquake, are youtalking about? The gods are by no means wanting in respect for you. Itwould be monstrous were they to insult one so old and honoured asyou are. As regards mortals, however, if any of them is indulging ininsolence and treating you disrespectfully, it will always rest withyourself to deal with him as you may think proper, so do just as youplease."

  • 江济淮 08-08

      "Hear me," he cried, "daughter of Aegis-bearing Jove, unweariable,hear me now, for you gave no heed to my prayers when Neptune waswrecking me. Now, therefore, have pity upon me and grant that I mayfind friends and be hospitably received by the Phaecians."

  • 程康林 08-08

       The rest agreed, and Leiodes son of OEnops was the first to rise. Hewas sacrificial priest to the suitors, and sat in the corner nearthe mixing-bowl. He was the only man who hated their evil deeds andwas indignant with the others. He was now the first to take the bowand arrow, so he went on to the pavement to make his trial, but hecould not string the bow, for his hands were weak and unused to hardwork, they therefore soon grew tired, and he said to the suitors,"My friends, I cannot string it; let another have it; this bow shalltake the life and soul out of many a chief among us, for it isbetter to die than to live after having missed the prize that wehave so long striven for, and which has brought us so long together.Some one of us is even now hoping and praying that he may marryPenelope, but when he has seen this bow and tried it, let him wooand make bridal offerings to some other woman, and let Penelopemarry whoever makes her the best offer and whose lot it is to winher."

  • 张红宇 08-08

      This frightened Irus still more, but they brought him into themiddle of the court, and the two men raised their hands to fight. ThenUlysses considered whether he should let drive so hard at him as tomake an end of him then and there, or whether he should give him alighter blow that should only knock him down; in the end he deemedit best to give the lighter blow for fear the Achaeans should begin tosuspect who he was. Then they began to fight, and Irus hit Ulysseson the right shoulder; but Ulysses gave Irus a blow on the neckunder the ear that broke in the bones of his skull, and the blood camegushing out of his mouth; he fell groaning in the dust, gnashing histeeth and kicking on the ground, but the suitors threw up theirhands and nearly died of laughter, as Ulysses caught hold of him bythe foot and dragged him into the outer court as far as thegate-house. There he propped him up against the wall and put his staffin his hands. "Sit here," said he, "and keep the dogs and pigs off;you are a pitiful creature, and if you try to make yourself king ofthe beggars any more you shall fare still worse."

  • 坎井 08-07

    {  On this the old woman went out of the room to bid the maids go totheir mistress. In the meantime Minerva bethought her of anothermatter, and sent Penelope off into a sweet slumber; so she lay down onher couch and her limbs became heavy with sleep. Then the goddess shedgrace and beauty over her that all the Achaeans might admire her.She washed her face with the ambrosial loveliness that Venus wearswhen she goes dancing with the Graces; she made her taller and of amore commanding figure, while as for her complexion it was whiter thansawn ivory. When Minerva had done all this she went away, whereonthe maids came in from the women's room and woke Penelope with thesound of their talking.

  • 蔡锦波 08-06

      "When I saw him I tried to pacify him and said, 'Ajax, will younot forget and forgive even in death, but must the judgement aboutthat hateful armour still rankle with you? It cost us Argives dearenough to lose such a tower of strength as you were to us. Wemourned you as much as we mourned Achilles son of Peleus himself,nor can the blame be laid on anything but on the spite which Jove boreagainst the Danaans, for it was this that made him counsel yourdestruction- come hither, therefore, bring your proud spirit intosubjection, and hear what I can tell you.'}

  • 葛闯关 08-06

      Then Jove's daughter Minerva came up to them, having assumed theform and voice of Mentor. Ulysses was glad when he saw her, and saidto his son Telemachus, "Telemachus, now that are about to fight inan engagement, which will show every man's mettle, be sure not todisgrace your ancestors, who were eminent for their strength andcourage all the world over."

  • 罗宾 08-06

      "Alcinous," said he, "it is not creditable to you that a strangershould be seen sitting among the ashes of your hearth; every one iswaiting to hear what you are about to say; tell him, then, to rise andtake a seat on a stool inlaid with silver, and bid your servants mixsome wine and water that we may make a drink-offering to Jove the lordof thunder, who takes all well-disposed suppliants under hisprotection; and let the housekeeper give him some supper, ofwhatever there may be in the house."

  • 契诃夫 08-05

       BOOK XIX.

  • 王裳 08-03

    {  "These two," continued Ulysses, "will not keep long out of the fray,when the suitors and we join fight in my house. Now, therefore, returnhome early to-morrow morning, and go about among the suitors asbefore. Later on the swineherd will bring me to the city disguisedas a miserable old beggar. If you see them ill-treating me, steel yourheart against my sufferings; even though they drag me feet foremostout of the house, or throw things at me, look on and do nothing beyondgently trying to make them behave more reasonably; but they will notlisten to you, for the day of their reckoning is at hand.Furthermore I say, and lay my saying to your heart, when Minerva shallput it in my mind, I will nod my head to you, and on seeing me do thisyou must collect all the armour that is in the house and hide it inthe strong store room. Make some excuse when the suitors ask you whyyou are removing it; say that you have taken it to be out of the wayof the smoke, inasmuch as it is no longer what it was when Ulysseswent away, but has become soiled and begrimed with soot. Add to thismore particularly that you are afraid Jove may set them on toquarrel over their wine, and that they may do each other some harmwhich may disgrace both banquet and wooing, for the sight of armssometimes tempts people to use them. But leave a sword and a spearapiece for yourself and me, and a couple oxhide shields so that we cansnatch them up at any moment; Jove and Minerva will then soon quietthese people. There is also another matter; if you are indeed my sonand my blood runs in your veins, let no one know that Ulysses iswithin the house- neither Laertes, nor yet the swineherd, nor any ofthe servants, nor even Penelope herself. Let you and me exploit thewomen alone, and let us also make trial of some other of the menservants, to see who is on our side and whose hand is against us."

  • 陆晓炜 08-03

      Meanwhile Philoetius slipped quietly out and made fast the gatesof the outer court. There was a ship's cable of byblus fibre lyingin the gatehouse, so he made the gates fast with it and then came inagain, resuming the seat that he had left, and keeping an eye onUlysses, who had now got the bow in his hands, and was turning itevery way about, and proving it all over to see whether the wormshad been eating into its two horns during his absence. Then wouldone turn towards his neighbour saying, "This is some tricky oldbow-fancier; either he has got one like it at home, or he wants tomake one, in such workmanlike style does the old vagabond handle it."

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