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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:杨良文 大小:MQhIluyj74917KB 下载:X3Jpk2lc40734次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:eJmnk75d47872条
日期:2020-08-09 06:05:04
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  AND ULYSSES answered, "King Alcinous, it is a good thing to hear abard with such a divine voice as this man has. There is nothing betteror more delightful than when a whole people make merry together,with the guests sitting orderly to listen, while the table is loadedwith bread and meats, and the cup-bearer draws wine and fills hiscup for every man. This is indeed as fair a sight as a man can see.Now, however, since you are inclined to ask the story of my sorrows,and rekindle my own sad memories in respect of them, I do not know howto begin, nor yet how to continue and conclude my tale, for the handof heaven has been laid heavily upon me.
2.  "'When you shall have thus besought the ghosts with your prayers,offer them a ram and a black ewe, bending their heads towardsErebus; but yourself turn away from them as though you would maketowards the river. On this, many dead men's ghosts will come to you,and you must tell your men to skin the two sheep that you have justkilled, and offer them as a burnt sacrifice with prayers to Hadesand to Proserpine. Then draw your sword and sit there, so as toprevent any other poor ghost from coming near the split blood beforeTeiresias shall have answered your questions. The seer willpresently come to you, and will tell you about your voyage- whatstages you are to make, and how you are to sail the see so as to reachyour home.'
3.  "Ulysses," said Minerva, "noble son of Laertes, think how you canlay hands on these disreputable people who have been lording it inyour house these three years, courting your wife and making weddingpresents to her, while she does nothing but lament your absence,giving hope and sending your encouraging messages to every one ofthem, but meaning the very opposite of all she says'
4.  "As soon as I got down to my ship and to the sea shore I rebukedeach one of the men separately, but we could see no way out of it, forthe cows were dead already. And indeed the gods began at once toshow signs and wonders among us, for the hides of the cattle crawledabout, and the joints upon the spits began to low like cows, and themeat, whether cooked or raw, kept on making a noise just as cows do.
5.  Laertes was delighted when he heard this. "Good heavens, heexclaimed, "what a day I am enjoying: I do indeed rejoice at it. Myson and grandson are vying with one another in the matter of valour."
6.  Thus did they converse. Meanwhile the suitors were hatching a plotto murder Telemachus: but a bird flew near them on their left hand- aneagle with a dove in its talons. On this Amphinomus said, "My friends,this plot of ours to murder Telemachus will not succeed; let us goto dinner instead."

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1.  Ulysses answered, "May King Jove grant all happiness toTelemachus, and fulfil the desire of his heart."
2.  "And I answered, 'Circe, how can you expect me to be friendly withyou when you have just been turning all my men into pigs? And now thatyou have got me here myself, you mean me mischief when you ask me togo to bed with you, and will unman me and make me fit for nothing. Ishall certainly not consent to go to bed with you unless you willfirst take your solemn oath to plot no further harm against me.'
3.  Thus did they converse; but the others, when they had finished theirwork and the feast was ready, left off working, and took each hisproper place on the benches and seats. Then they began eating; byand by old Dolius and his sons left their work and came up, fortheir mother, the Sicel woman who looked after Laertes now that he wasgrowing old, had been to fetch them. When they saw Ulysses and werecertain it was he, they stood there lost in astonishment; butUlysses scolded them good-naturedly and said, "Sit down to yourdinner, old man, and never mind about your surprise; we have beenwanting to begin for some time and have been waiting for you."
4.  Such was his story, but Minerva smiled and caressed him with herhand. Then she took the form of a woman, fair, stately, and wise,"He must be indeed a shifty lying fellow," said she, "who couldsurpass you in all manner of craft even though you had a god foryour antagonist. Dare-devil that you are, full of guile, unwearying indeceit, can you not drop your tricks and your instinctive falsehood,even now that you are in your own country again? We will say nomore, however, about this, for we can both of us deceive uponoccasion- you are the most accomplished counsellor and orator amongall mankind, while I for diplomacy and subtlety have no equal amongthe gods. Did you not know Jove's daughter Minerva- me, who havebeen ever with you, who kept watch over you in all your troubles,and who made the Phaeacians take so great a liking to you? And now,again, I am come here to talk things over with you, and help you tohide the treasure I made the Phaeacians give you; I want to tell youabout the troubles that await you in your own house; you have got toface them, but tell no one, neither man nor woman, that you havecome home again. Bear everything, and put up with every man'sinsolence, without a word."
5.  "He got more and more furious as he heard me, so he tore the topfrom off a high mountain, and flung it just in front of my ship sothat it was within a little of hitting the end of the rudder. Thesea quaked as the rock fell into it, and the wash of the wave itraised carried us back towards the mainland, and forced us towards theshore. But I snatched up a long pole and kept the ship off, makingsigns to my men by nodding my head, that they must row for theirlives, whereon they laid out with a will. When we had got twice as faras we were before, I was for jeering at the Cyclops again, but the menbegged and prayed of me to hold my tongue.
6.  "Hush," answered Ulysses, "hold your peace and ask no questions, forthis is the manner of the gods. Get you to your bed, and leave me hereto talk with your mother and the maids. Your mother in her griefwill ask me all sorts of questions."

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1.  Then Minerva answered, "Sir, you have spoken well, and it will bemuch better that Telemachus should do as you have said; he, therefore,shall return with you and sleep at your house, but I must go back togive orders to my crew, and keep them in good heart. I am the onlyolder person among them; the rest are all young men of Telemachus' ownage, who have taken this voyage out of friendship; so I must return tothe ship and sleep there. Moreover to-morrow I must go to theCauconians where I have a large sum of money long owing to me. Asfor Telemachus, now that he is your guest, send him to Lacedaemon in achariot, and let one of your sons go with him. Be pleased also toprovide him with your best and fleetest horses."
2.  The rest agreed, and Leiodes son of OEnops was the first to rise. Hewas sacrificial priest to the suitors, and sat in the corner nearthe mixing-bowl. He was the only man who hated their evil deeds andwas indignant with the others. He was now the first to take the bowand arrow, so he went on to the pavement to make his trial, but hecould not string the bow, for his hands were weak and unused to hardwork, they therefore soon grew tired, and he said to the suitors,"My friends, I cannot string it; let another have it; this bow shalltake the life and soul out of many a chief among us, for it isbetter to die than to live after having missed the prize that wehave so long striven for, and which has brought us so long together.Some one of us is even now hoping and praying that he may marryPenelope, but when he has seen this bow and tried it, let him wooand make bridal offerings to some other woman, and let Penelopemarry whoever makes her the best offer and whose lot it is to winher."
3.  So here Ulysses stood for a while and looked about him, but whenhe had looked long enough he crossed the threshold and went within theprecincts of the house. There he found all the chief people amongthe Phaecians making their drink-offerings to Mercury, which theyalways did the last thing before going away for the night. He wentstraight through the court, still hidden by the cloak of darkness inwhich Minerva had enveloped him, till he reached Arete and KingAlcinous; then he laid his hands upon the knees of the queen, and atthat moment the miraculous darkness fell away from him and he becamevisible. Every one was speechless with surprise at seeing a man there,but Ulysses began at once with his petition.
4.  With these words she came down from her upper room, not alone butattended by two of her maidens, and when she reached the suitors shestood by one of the bearing-posts supporting the roof of the cloister,holding a veil before her face, and with a staid maid servant oneither side of her. As they beheld her the suitors were so overpoweredand became so desperately enamoured of her, that each one prayed hemight win her for his own bed fellow.
5.   Then Telemachus spoke. "Great heavens!" he exclaimed, "Jove musthave robbed me of my senses. Here is my dear and excellent mothersaying she will quit this house and marry again, yet I am laughing andenjoying myself as though there were nothing happening. But,suitors, as the contest has been agreed upon, let it go forward. It isfor a woman whose peer is not to be found in Pylos, Argos, orMycene, nor yet in Ithaca nor on the mainland. You know this as wellas I do; what need have I to speak in praise of my mother? Come on,then, make no excuses for delay, but let us see whether you can stringthe bow or no. I too will make trial of it, for if I can string it andshoot through the iron, I shall not suffer my mother to quit thishouse with a stranger, not if I can win the prizes which my father wonbefore me."
6.  "Here we entered, but so dark was the night that some god musthave brought us in, for there was nothing whatever to be seen. A thickmist hung all round our ships; the moon was hidden behind a mass ofclouds so that no one could have seen the island if he had lookedfor it, nor were there any breakers to tell us we were close inshore before we found ourselves upon the land itself; when, however,we had beached the ships, we took down the sails, went ashore andcamped upon the beach till daybreak.

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1.  Thus did he speak, and the others applauded his saying; they thenall of them went inside the buildings.
2.  And the ghost of Amphimedon answered, "Agamemnon, son of Atreus,king of men, I remember everything that you have said, and will tellyou fully and accurately about the way in which our end was broughtabout. Ulysses had been long gone, and we were courting his wife,who did not say point blank that she would not marry, nor yet bringmatters to an end, for she meant to compass our destruction: this,then, was the trick she played us. She set up a great tambour frame inher room and began to work on an enormous piece of fine needlework.'Sweethearts,' said she, 'Ulysses is indeed dead, still, do notpress me to marry again immediately; wait- for I would not have myskill in needlework perish unrecorded- till I have completed a pallfor the hero Laertes, against the time when death shall take him. Heis very rich, and the women of the place will talk if he is laid outwithout a pall.' This is what she said, and we assented; whereuponwe could see her working upon her great web all day long, but at nightshe would unpick the stitches again by torchlight. She fooled us inthis way for three years without our finding it out, but as timewore on and she was now in her fourth year, in the waning of moons andmany days had been accomplished, one of her maids who knew what shewas doing told us, and we caught her in the act of undoing her work,so she had to finish it whether she would or no; and when she showedus the robe she had made, after she had had it washed, its splendourwas as that of the sun or moon.
3.  THEY reached the low lying city of Lacedaemon them where theydrove straight to the of abode Menelaus [and found him in his ownhouse, feasting with his many clansmen in honour of the wedding of hisson, and also of his daughter, whom he was marrying to the son of thatvaliant warrior Achilles. He had given his consent and promised her tohim while he was still at Troy, and now the gods were bringing themarriage about; so he was sending her with chariots and horses tothe city of the Myrmidons over whom Achilles' son was reigning. Forhis only son he had found a bride from Sparta, daughter of Alector.This son, Megapenthes, was born to him of a bondwoman, for heavenvouchsafed Helen no more children after she had borne Hermione, whowas fair as golden Venus herself.
4、  "Mentor," answered Telemachus, "do not let us talk about it anymore. There is no chance of my father's ever coming back; the godshave long since counselled his destruction. There is something else,however, about which I should like to ask Nestor, for he knows muchmore than any one else does. They say he has reigned for threegenerations so that it is like talking to an immortal. Tell me,therefore, Nestor, and tell me true; how did Agamemnon come to diein that way? What was Menelaus doing? And how came false Aegisthusto kill so far better a man than himself? Was Menelaus away fromAchaean Argos, voyaging elsewhither among mankind, that Aegisthus tookheart and killed Agamemnon?"
5、  With these words he scared the women, and they went off into thebody of the house. They trembled all aver, for they thought he woulddo as he said. But Ulysses took his stand near the burning braziers,holding up torches and looking at the people- brooding the while onthings that should surely come to pass.

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  • 陈琛 08-08

      Then the queen went back to her room upstairs, and her maids broughtthe presents after her. Meanwhile the suitors took to singing anddancing, and stayed till evening came. They danced and sang till itgrew dark; they then brought in three braziers to give light, andpiled them up with chopped firewood very and dry, and they lit torchesfrom them, which the maids held up turn and turn about. Then Ulyssessaid:

  • 仲弘 08-08

      "And I said, 'Circe, no man with any sense of what is right canthink of either eating or drinking in your house until you have sethis friends free and let him see them. If you want me to eat anddrink, you must free my men and bring them to me that I may see themwith my own eyes.'

  • 葛大店 08-08

       She went wondering back into the house, and laid her son's saying inher heart. Then going upstairs with her handmaids into her room, shemourned her dear husband till Minerva sent sweet sleep over hereyelids.

  • 刘明璞 08-08

      Penelope, who was sleeping sweetly at the gates of dreamland,answered, "Sister, why have you come here? You do not come very often,but I suppose that is because you live such a long way off. Am I,then, to leave off crying and refrain from all the sad thoughts thattorture me? I, who have lost my brave and lion-hearted husband, whohad every good quality under heaven, and whose name was great over allHellas and middle Argos; and now my darling son has gone off onboard of a ship- a foolish fellow who has never been used toroughing it, nor to going about among gatherings of men. I am evenmore anxious about him than about my husband; I am all in a tremblewhen I think of him, lest something should happen to him, eitherfrom the people among whom he has gone, or by sea, for he has manyenemies who are plotting against him, and are bent on killing himbefore he can return home."

  • 陶大伟 08-07

    {  Then Telemachus said, "Eurymachus, and you other suitors, I shallsay no more, and entreat you no further, for the gods and the peopleof Ithaca now know my story. Give me, then, a ship and a crew oftwenty men to take me hither and thither, and I will go to Spartaand to Pylos in quest of my father who has so long been missing.Some one may tell me something, or (and people often hear things inthis way) some heaven-sent message may direct me. If I can hear of himas alive and on his way home I will put up with the waste yousuitors will make for yet another twelve months. If on the otherhand I hear of his death, I will return at once, celebrate his funeralrites with all due pomp, build a barrow to his memory, and make mymother marry again."

  • 柏木 08-06

      "Some things, Telemachus," answered Minerva, "will be suggested toyou by your own instinct, and heaven will prompt you further; for I amassured that the gods have been with you from the time of your birthuntil now."}

  • 汪长青 08-06

      "Stranger," said she, "rise and let us be going back to the town;I will introduce you at the house of my excellent father, where Ican tell you that you will meet all the best people among thePhaecians. But be sure and do as I bid you, for you seem to be asensible person. As long as we are going past the fields- and farmlands, follow briskly behind the waggon along with the maids and Iwill lead the way myself. Presently, however, we shall come to thetown, where you will find a high wall running all round it, and a goodharbour on either side with a narrow entrance into the city, and theships will be drawn up by the road side, for every one has a placewhere his own ship can lie. You will see the market place with atemple of Neptune in the middle of it, and paved with large stonesbedded in the earth. Here people deal in ship's gear of all kinds,such as cables and sails, and here, too, are the places where oars aremade, for the Phaeacians are not a nation of archers; they knownothing about bows and arrows, but are a sea-faring folk, and pridethemselves on their masts, oars, and ships, with which they travel farover the sea.

  • 蔡勉 08-06

      "Sir, my father Nestor, when we used to talk about you at home, toldme you were a person of rare and excellent understanding. If, then, itbe possible, do as I would urge you. I am not fond of crying while Iam getting my supper. Morning will come in due course, and in theforenoon I care not how much I cry for those that are dead and gone.This is all we can do for the poor things. We can only shave our headsfor them and wring the tears from our cheeks. I had a brother who diedat Troy; he was by no means the worst man there; you are sure tohave known him- his name was Antilochus; I never set eyes upon himmyself, but they say that he was singularly fleet of foot and in fightvaliant."

  • 科曼 08-05

       Meantime the suitors went on board and sailed their ways over thesea, intent on murdering Telemachus. Now there is a rocky islet calledAsteris, of no great size, in mid channel between Ithaca and Samos,and there is a harbour on either side of it where a ship can lie. Herethen the Achaeans placed themselves in ambush.

  • 申善英 08-03

    {  He wept as he spoke and every one pitied him. But Medon and the bardPhemius had now woke up, and came to them from the house of Ulysses.Every one was astonished at seeing them, but they stood in themiddle of the assembly, and Medon said, "Hear me, men of Ithaca.Ulysses did not do these things against the will of heaven. I myselfsaw an immortal god take the form of Mentor and stand beside him. Thisgod appeared, now in front of him encouraging him, and now goingfuriously about the court and attacking the suitors whereon theyfell thick on one another."

  • 洛发福 08-03

      He counted his goodly coppers and cauldrons, his gold and all hisclothes, but there was nothing missing; still he kept grieving aboutnot being in his own country, and wandered up and down by the shore ofthe sounding sea bewailing his hard fate. Then Minerva came up tohim disguised as a young shepherd of delicate and princely mien,with a good cloak folded double about her shoulders; she had sandalson her comely feet and held a javelin in her hand. Ulysses was gladwhen he saw her, and went straight up to her.

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