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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:杨建华 大小:QFFCMiHT31638KB 下载:1ic2HKjE53845次
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日期:2020-08-08 12:06:02
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谈兴正

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Calandrino being very mistrustfull, scratched his head, yet felte heno grievance at all; and going still on; Buffalmaco sodainelyencountred him, upon his departure from Nello, and after salutationspassing betweene them; in a manner of admiration, demanded what heayled?
2.  Heereupon, he commanded Pyrrhus to come downe, and being on theground: Now Pyrrhus (quoth he) tell me what thou saydst. Pyrrhus,pretending an alteration into much amazement, straungely looking abouthim, saide; I know not verie well (my Lord) what answere I should makeyou, fearing least my sight hath bin abused by error: for when I wasaloft in that Tree, it seemed manifestly to me: that you embraced myLady (though somewhat rudely, in regard of her perillous sicknesse,yet lovingly) and as youthfully as in your yonger dales, with infinitekisses, and wanton dalliances, such as (indeede) deserved a far moreprivate place in my poore opinion. But in my descending downe, meethought you gave over that amorous familiaritie, and I found youseated as I left you. Now trust mee Pyrrhus, answered Nicostratus, Thytongue and wit have very strangely wandred, both from reason and allreall apprehension: because we never stirred from hence, since thoudidst climbe up into the Tree, neither mooved otherwise, then as nowthou seest us. Alas my Lord (saide Pyrrhus) I humbly crave pardonfor my presumption, in reprooving you for medling with your owne:which shal make me hereafter better advised, in any thing whatsoever I heare or see.
3.  THE TENTH DAY, THE TENTH NOVELL
4.  And gave command in spight,
5.  Thus the innocent Count, by his overhasty and sodaine flight, madehimselfe guilty of this foule imputation: and arriving at Callice withhis children, their poore and homely habites, hid them from beingknowne, and thence they crossed over into England, staying no whereuntill hee came to London. Before he would enter into the City, hegave divers good advertisements to his children, but especially twoprecepts above all the rest. First, with patient soules to support thepoore condition, whereto Fortune (without any offence in him orthem) had thus dejected them. Next, that they should have mostheedfull care, at no time to disclose from whence they came, orwhose children they were, because it extended to the perill of theirlives. His Sonne, being named Lewes, and now about nine yeares old,his Daughter called Violenta, and aged seaven yeares, did both observetheir fathers direction, as afterward it did sufficiently appeare. Andbecause they might live in the safer securitie, hee thought it for thebest to change their names, calling his Sonne Perotto, and hisDaughter Gianetta, for thus they might best escape unknowne.
6.  Pasimondo had a Brother, yonger then he in yeeres, but not a jotinferiour to him in vertue, whose name was Hormisda, and long time thecase had bene in question, for his taking to wife a faire youngGentlewoman of Rhodes, called Cassandra; whom Lysimachus the Governourloved very dearly, and hindred her marriage with Hormisda, by diversstrange accidents. Now Pasimondo perceiving, that his owne Nuptialsrequired much cost and solemnity, hee thought it very convenient, thatone day might serve for both their Weddings, which else would lanchinto more lavish expences, and therefore concluded, that his brotherHormisda should marry Cassandra, at the same time as he weddedIphigenia. Hereupon, he consulted with the Gentlewomans parents, wholiking the motion as well as he, the determination was set downe,and one day to effect the duties of both.

计划指导

1.  HEEREIN ALL MEN ARE ADMONISHED, NEVER TO DISTRUST THE POWERFULL
2.  Simonida awaking, even when her Husband went foorth of theChamber, and finding the thred to be cut from her toe; conjecturedimmediately, that her subtle cunning was discovered, and supposing herHusband in pursuite of Roberto, presently she arose; and,considering what was likely to ensue thereon, called her Chamber-maide(who was not ignorant of the businesse) and by perswasions prevailedso with her, that she lay downe in her place in the bed, uponsolemne protestations and liberall promises, not to make her selfeknowne, but to suffer all patiently, either blowes, or other ill usageof her Husband, which shee would recompence in such bountifull sort,as she should have no occasion to complaine. So, putting out thewatchlight, which every night burned in the Chamber, she departedthence, and sate downe in a close corner of the house, to see whatwould be the end of all this stirre, after her Husbands comming home.
3.  Master Doctor hearing this Discourse, and beleeving it constantly,without any further instruction or intelligence: became possessed withverie much admiration, and had the most earnest desire in the world,to know what this Travailing to Corsica might meane: entreatingBruno with very great instances, to tell him what it was, and mademany protestations never to disclose it to anie one. How now MasterDoctor? answered Bruno, What a strange motion do you make to mee? Itis too great a secret, which you desire to know, yea, a matter of mineowne ruine, and an utter expulsion out of this Worlde, withcondemnation into the mouth of Lucifer da San Gallo, if any manwhatsoever should know it from me, wherefore I pray you to urge itno more. O my deer and honest neighbour Bruno (quoth the Doctor)assure thy selfe upon my soul, that whatsoever thou revealest to me,shall be under seale from all, but onely our selves. Fie, fie MasterDoctor, answered Bruno, you are too pressing and importunate. Sositting smiling to himselfe, shaking his head, and beating his breast,as if hee were in some straunge distraction of minde, stamping withhis feete, and beating his Fiste oftentimes on the Table, at ast hestarted uppe, and spake in this manner.
4.  This answere was very welcome to the Marquesse, as apparantlyperceiving hereby, that the dignity whereto hee had exalted her, orany particular favours beside, could not infect her with any pride,coynesse, or disdaine. Not long after, having told her in plaine andopen speeches, that his subjects could not endure her so late bornedaughter: he called a trusty servant of his, and having instructed himwhat he should doe, sent him to Grizelda, and he being alone with her,looking very sadde, and much perplexed in mind, he saide. Madame,except I intend to loose mine owne life, I must accomplish what myLord hath strictly enjoyned me, which is, to take this your yongdaughter, and then I must: So breaking off abruptly, the Ladyhearing his words, and noting his frowning lookes, remembring alsowhat the Marquesse himselfe had formerly said; she presently imagined,that he had commanded his servant to kill the childe. Suddenlytherefore, she tooke it out of the Cradle, and having sweetlykissed, and bestowne her blessing on it (albeit her heart throbbed,with the inward affection of a Mother) without any alteration ofcountenance, she tenderly laid it in the servants armes, and said.Here friend, take it, and doe with it as thy Lord and mine hathcommanded thee: but leave it in no rude place, where birds or savagebeasts may devour it, except it be his will to have it so.
5.  Which tydings comming to the hearing of Signior Gentile, by one thatwas his endeared friend: Although (while she lived) he could neverbe gracious n her favour, yet her so sudden death did greatly grievehim, whereupon he discoursed in this sort with himselfe. DeareMadame Catharina, I am not a little sorry for thy death, although(during thy life-time) I was scarcely worthy of one kind looke: Yetnow being dead, thou canst not prohibite me, but I may robbe thee of akisse. No sooner had hee spoke the words, but it beeing then night,and taking such order, as none might know of his departure: heemounted on horsebacke, accompanied onely with one servant, andstayed no where, till hee came to the vault where the Lady was buried.Which when he had opened, with instruments convenient for the purpose,he descended downe into the vault, and kneeled downe by the Beerewhereon she lay, and in her wearing garments, according to theusuall manner; with teares trickling mainly downe his cheekes, hebestowed infinite sweet kisses on her.
6.  Nor could I count it rude, or rigorous,

推荐功能

1.  Ischia is an Iland very neere to Naples, wherein (not long since)lived a faire and lovely Gentlewoman, named Restituta, Daughter to aGentleman of the same Isle, whose name was Marino Bolgaro. A properyouth called Guion, dwelling also in a neere neighbouring Isle, calledProcida, did love her as dearly as his owne life, and she was asintimately affected towards him. Now because the sight of her washis onely comfort, as occasion gave him leave, he resorted to Ischiavery often in the day time, and as often also in the night season,when any Barke passed from Procida to Ischia; if to see nothingelse, yet to behold the walles that enclosed his Mistresse thus.
2.  Madam Lauretta having concluded her Novel, and the companycomplaining on Lovers misfortunes, some blaming the angry andjealous fury of Ninetta, and every one delivering their severallopinions; the King, as awaking out of a passionate perplexity, exaltedhis lookes, giving a signe to Madame Elisa, that shee should follownext in order, whereto she obeying, began in this manner. I have heard(Gracious Ladies, quoth she) of many people, who are verily perswaded,that loves arrowes, never wound any body, but onely by the eyes lookesand gazes, mocking and scorning such as maintaine that men may fall inlove by hearing onely. Wherein (beleeve me) they are greatly deceived,as will appeare by a Novell which I must now relate unto you, andwherein you shall plainely perceive, that not onely fame or reportis as prevailing as sight; but also hath conducted divers, to awretched and miserable ending of their lives.
3.  Hereupon, the one soliciting, and the other taking delight inbeing solicited; it came to passe, that often accesse bred thebolder courage, and over-much bashfulnesse became abandoned, yet noimmodesty passing betweene them: but affection grew the bettersetled in them both, by interchangeable vowes of constantperseverance, so that death onely, but no disaster else had power todivide them. Their mutuall delight continuing on in this manner,with more forcible encreasing of their Loves equall flame: itfortuned, that Pasquino sitting by Simonida, told her of a goodlyGarden, whereto he was desirous to bring her, to the end, that theymight the more safely converse together, without the suspition ofenvious eyes. Simonida gave answer of her wellliking the motion, andacquainting her Father therewith, he gave her leave, on the Sundayfollowing after dinner, to go fetch the pardon of S. Gallo, andafterwards to visit the Garden.
4.  THE NINTH DAY, THE SIXT NOVELL
5.   Justly deserve by death to be controld.
6.  These words and their shrill out-cries also were heard by Neighboursdwelling neere to the Garden, who comming in sodainly uppon them,and seeing Pasquino lying dead, and hugely swoln, Strambo likewisecomplaining, and accusing Simonida to have poysoned him; she making noanswer, but standing in a gastly amazement, all her senses meerelyconfounded, at such a strange and uncouth accident, in loosing himwhom she so dearely loved: knew not how to excuse-her selfe, andtherefore every one verily beleeved, that Strambo had not unjustlyaccused her. Poore wofull maide, thus was she instantly apprehended,and drowned in her teares, they led her along to the Potes. tatesPalace, where her accusation was justified by Strambo, Lagina, and twomen more; the one named Atticciato, and the other Malagevole, fellowesand companions with Pasquino, who came into the Garden also upon theout-cry.

应用

1.  Never was Lover so unjust,
2.  THE FOURTH DAY, THE SIXTH NOVELL
3.  CHILDRENS LOVE AND THEIR OWNE CREDIT, TO CUT OFF
4、  SINNE IN OTHER MEN, SHOULD FIRST EXAMINE HIMSELFE, THAT HE
5、  At a certaine season in the yeare, as customary order (thereobserved) had formerly beene, in the City of Acres which was under theSoldanes subjection, there yeerely met a great assembly ofMerchants, as Christians, Moores, jewes, Sarazens, and many otherNations besides, as at a common Mart or Fayre. And to the end, thatthe Merchants (for the better sale of their goods) might be there inthe safer assurance, the Soldane used to send thither some of hisordinarie Officers, and a strong guard of Souldiers beside, todefend them from all injuries and molestation, because he reapedthereby no meane benefit. And who should be now sent about thisbusinesse, but his new elected favourite Sicurano, because she wasskilfull and. perfect in the Languages.

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网友评论(cX1XAOz768085))

  • 张兆国 08-07

      Having lighted many Torches, the Abbot and his Monkes entred withthe Sexton into the Church, where they beheld the wonderful richebedde, and the Knight lying fast asleepe in it. While they stood allin amazement, not daring to approach neere the bedde, whereon lay suchcostly jewells: it chanced that Signior Thorello awaked, andbreathed forth a vehement sigh. The Monkes and the Abbot seeing him tostirre, ranne all away in feare, crying aloud, God and S. Peter defendus.

  • 吴永胜 08-07

      There shalt thou finde two Capons drest,

  • 杨宗圣 08-07

       WHEREIN IS DECLARED, HOW EASILY A PLAINE AND SIMPLE MAN MAY BE

  • 冯绍峰 08-07

      For I beheld another in my place,

  • 孙敬清 08-06

    {  And thought me happy, being in Love.

  • 哈林顿 08-05

      WHEREBY ALL MEN MAY PLAINELY UNDERSTAND, THAT LOYALTY}

  • 程父 08-05

      That I desire in such assaults to die.

  • 魏永信 08-05

      REPREHENDING THE SIMPLICITY OF SOME SOTTISH HUSBANDS: AND

  • 李明冲 08-04

       Signior Andrea, you are the most welcome friend to me in theworld; sealing this salutation with infinite sweet kisses andembraces: whereat (in wonderfull amazement) he being strangelytransported, replied; Madame, you honour me beyond all compasse ofmerit. Then, taking him by the hand, shee guided him thorough a goodlyHall, into her owne Chamber, which was delicately embalmed with Roses,Orenge flowers, and all other pleasing smelles, and a costly bed inthe middest, curtained round about, verie artificiall Picturesbeautifying the walles, with many other embellishments, such asthose Countries are liberally stored withall. He being meerely anovice in these kinds of wanton carriages of the World, and freefrom any base or degenerate conceite; firmely perswaded himselfe, that(questionlesse) she was a Lady of no meane esteeme, and he more thenhappy, to be thus respected and honored by her. They both being seatedon a curious Chest at the beds feete, teares cunningly trickling downeher Cheekes, and sighes intermedled with inward sobbings, breathedfoorth in sad, but verie seemely manner, thus shee beganne.

  • 陈幸进 08-02

    {  Poore Simonida, sighing and sorrowing for her deere loves losse, and(perhappes) not meanly terrified, with the strict infliction oftorment so severely urged and followed by Strambo and the reststanding dumb still, without answering so much as one word; by tastingof the same Sage, fell downe dead by the bed, even by the likeaccident Pasquino formerly did, to the admirable astonishment of allthere present.

  • 文道 08-02

      From temperate and calme speeches, they fell to frownes and ruderLanguage, which heated their blood in such violent manner, thatforgetting brotherly affection, and all respect of Parents or Friends,they drew forth their Ponyards, stabbing each other so often anddesperately, that before any in the shippe had the power or meanesto part them, both of them being very dangerously wounded, the youngerbrother fell downe dead: the elder being in little better case, byreceiving so many perilous hurts, remained (neverthelesse) living.This unhappy accident displeased the Lady very highly, seeing herselfe thus left alone, without the help or counsell of any bodie;and fearing greatly, least the anger of the two Brethrens Parentsand Friends, should now bee laide to her charge, and thereon followseverity of punishment. But the earnest entreaties of the woundedsurviver, and their arrivall at Smirna soone after, delivered him fromthe danger of death, gave some ease to her sorrow, and there withhim she went on shore.Remaining there with him in a common Inne, while he continued inthe Chirurgians cure, the fame of her singular and much admired beautywas soone spread abroad throughout all the City: and amongst the rest,to the hearing of the Prince of Ionia, who lately before (on veryurgent occasions) was come to Smyrna. This rare rumour, made himdesirous to see her, and after he had seene her, shee seemed farrefairer in his eye, then common report had noised her to be, andsuddenly grew so enamored of her, that she was the onely Idea of hisbest desires. Afterward, understanding in what manner shee was broughtthither, he devised how to make her his own, practising all possiblemeanes to accomplish it: which when the wounded Brothers Parents heardof, they not onely made tender of their willingnesse therein, but alsoimmediately sent her to him: a matter most highly pleasing to thePrince, and likewise to the Lady her selfe; because she thought now tobe freed from no meane perill, which (otherwise) the wounded Merchantsfriends might have inflicted uppon her.

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