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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:马建军 大小:t1AM7AUL85289KB 下载:B9sGqbxB62873次
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日期:2020-08-12 06:53:02
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "Madam," answered Ulysses, "it is such a long time ago that I canhardly say. Twenty years are come and gone since he left my home,and went elsewhither; but I will tell you as well as I canrecollect. Ulysses wore a mantle of purple wool, double lined, andit was fastened by a gold brooch with two catches for the pin. Onthe face of this there was a device that showed a dog holding aspotted fawn between his fore paws, and watching it as it laypanting upon the ground. Every one marvelled at the way in which thesethings had been done in gold, the dog looking at the fawn, andstrangling it, while the fawn was struggling convulsively to escape.As for the shirt that he wore next his skin, it was so soft that itfitted him like the skin of an onion, and glistened in the sunlight tothe admiration of all the women who beheld it. Furthermore I say,and lay my saying to your heart, that I do not know whether Ulysseswore these clothes when he left home, or whether one of his companionshad given them to him while he was on his voyage; or possibly some oneat whose house he was staying made him a present of them, for he was aman of many friends and had few equals among the Achaeans. I myselfgave him a sword of bronze and a beautiful purple mantle, doublelined, with a shirt that went down to his feet, and I sent him onboard his ship with every mark of honour. He had a servant with him, alittle older than himself, and I can tell you what he was like; hisshoulders were hunched, he was dark, and he had thick curly hair.His name was Eurybates, and Ulysses treated him with greaterfamiliarity than he did any of the others, as being the mostlike-minded with himself."
2.  Penelope presently reached the oak threshold of the store room;the carpenter had planed this duly, and had drawn a line on it so asto get it quite straight; he had then set the door posts into it andhung the doors. She loosed the strap from the handle of the door,put in the key, and drove it straight home to shoot back the boltsthat held the doors; these flew open with a noise like a bullbellowing in a meadow, and Penelope stepped upon the raisedplatform, where the chests stood in which the fair linen and clotheswere laid by along with fragrant herbs: reaching thence, she took downthe bow with its bow case from the peg on which it hung. She satdown with it on her knees, weeping bitterly as she took the bow out ofits case, and when her tears had relieved her, she went to thecloister where the suitors were, carrying the bow and the quiver, withthe many deadly arrows that were inside it. Along with her came hermaidens, bearing a chest that contained much iron and bronze which herhusband had won as prizes. When she reached the suitors, she stoodby one of the bearing-posts supporting the roof of the cloister,holding a veil before her face, and with a maid on either side of her.Then she said:
3.  "If you really are my son Ulysses," replied Laertes, "and havecome back again, you must give me such manifest proof of your identityas shall convince me."
4.  So Eteoneus bustled back and bade other servants come with him. Theytook their sweating hands from under the yoke, made them fast to themangers, and gave them a feed of oats and barley mixed. Then theyleaned the chariot against the end wall of the courtyard, and ledthe way into the house. Telemachus and Pisistratus were astonishedwhen they saw it, for its splendour was as that of the sun and moon;then, when they had admired everything to their heart's content,they went into the bath room and washed themselves.
5.  "More's the pity," answered Telemachus, "I am sorry for him, butwe must leave him to himself just now. If people could have everythingtheir own way, the first thing I should choose would be the returnof my father; but go, and give your message; then make haste backagain, and do not turn out of your way to tell Laertes. Tell my motherto send one of her women secretly with the news at once, and let himhear it from her."
6.  "I stayed there for seven years and got together much money amongthe Egyptians, for they all gave me something; but when it was nowgoing on for eight years there came a certain Phoenician, a cunningrascal, who had already committed all sorts of villainy, and thisman talked me over into going with him to Phoenicia, where his houseand his possessions lay. I stayed there for a whole twelve months, butat the end of that time when months and days had gone by till the sameseason had come round again, he set me on board a ship bound forLibya, on a pretence that I was to take a cargo along with him to thatplace, but really that he might sell me as a slave and take themoney I fetched. I suspected his intention, but went on board withhim, for I could not help it.

计划指导

1.  As he spoke he handed her the cup. Minerva thought it very right andproper of him to have given it to herself first; she accordingly beganpraying heartily to Neptune. "O thou," she cried, "that encirclest theearth, vouchsafe to grant the prayers of thy servants that call uponthee. More especially we pray thee send down thy grace on Nestor andon his sons; thereafter also make the rest of the Pylian people somehandsome return for the goodly hecatomb they are offering you. Lastly,grant Telemachus and myself a happy issue, in respect of the matterthat has brought us in our to Pylos."
2.  "And I said, 'In truth Jove has hated the house of Atreus from firstto last in the matter of their women's counsels. See how many of usfell for Helen's sake, and now it seems that Clytemnestra hatchedmischief against too during your absence.'
3.  So saying she lashed the mules with her whip and they left theriver. The mules drew well and their hoofs went up and down upon theroad. She was careful not to go too fast for Ulysses and the maids whowere following on foot along with the waggon, so she plied her whipwith judgement. As the sun was going down they came to the sacredgrove of Minerva, and there Ulysses sat down and prayed to themighty daughter of Jove.
4.  She then went upstairs to her own room, not alone, but attended byher maidens, and when there, she lamented her dear husband tillMinerva shed sweet sleep over her eyelids.
5.  Menelaus on hearing this was very much shocked. "So," heexclaimed, "these cowards would usurp a brave man's bed? A hindmight as well lay her new born young in the lair of a lion, and thengo off to feed in the forest or in some grassy dell: the lion whenhe comes back to his lair will make short work with the pair ofthem- and so will Ulysses with these suitors. By father Jove, Minerva,and Apollo, if Ulysses is still the man that he was when he wrestledwith Philomeleides in Lesbos, and threw him so heavily that all theAchaeans cheered him- if he is still such and were to come nearthese suitors, they would have a short shrift and a sorry wedding.As regards your questions, however, I will not prevaricate nor deceiveyou, but will tell you without concealment all that the old man of thesea told me.
6.  As he spoke he girded on his armour. Then he roused Telemachus,Philoetius, and Eumaeus, and told them all to put on their armouralso. This they did, and armed themselves. When they had done so, theyopened the gates and sallied forth, Ulysses leading the way. It wasnow daylight, but Minerva nevertheless concealed them in darknessand led them quickly out of the town.

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1.  "I understand and heed you," replied Eumaeus; "you need instructme no further, only I am going that way say whether I had not betterlet poor Laertes know that you are returned. He used to superintendthe work on his farm in spite of his bitter sorrow about Ulysses,and he would eat and drink at will along with his servants; but theytell me that from the day on which you set out for Pylos he hasneither eaten nor drunk as he ought to do, nor does he look afterhis farm, but sits weeping and wasting the flesh from off his bones."
2.  BOOK VI.
3.  And Minerva said, "There is no fear of your race dying out yet,while Penelope has such a fine son as you are. But tell me, and tellme true, what is the meaning of all this feasting, and who are thesepeople? What is it all about? Have you some banquet, or is there awedding in the family- for no one seems to be bringing anyprovisions of his own? And the guests- how atrociously they arebehaving; what riot they make over the whole house; it is enough todisgust any respectable person who comes near them."
4.  "So I drew back, and sheathed my sword, whereon when he had drank ofthe blood he began with his prophecy.
5.   "Thus did we converse, and anon Proserpine sent up the ghosts of thewives and daughters of all the most famous men. They gathered incrowds about the blood, and I considered how I might question themseverally. In the end I deemed that it would be best to draw thekeen blade that hung by my sturdy thigh, and keep them from alldrinking the blood at once. So they came up one after the other, andeach one as I questioned her told me her race and lineage.
6.  "King Alcinous, you said your people were the nimblest dancers inthe world, and indeed they have proved themselves to be so. I wasastonished as I saw them."

应用

1.  It was not long ere Penelope came to know what the suitors wereplotting; for a man servant, Medon, overheard them from outside theouter court as they were laying their schemes within, and went to tellhis mistress. As he crossed the threshold of her room Penelope said:"Medon, what have the suitors sent you here for? Is it to tell themaids to leave their master's business and cook dinner for them? Iwish they may neither woo nor dine henceforward, neither here noranywhere else, but let this be the very last time, for the waste youall make of my son's estate. Did not your fathers tell you when youwere children how good Ulysses had been to them- never doinganything high-handed, nor speaking harshly to anybody? Kings may saythings sometimes, and they may take a fancy to one man and dislikeanother, but Ulysses never did an unjust thing by anybody- which showswhat bad hearts you have, and that there is no such thing as gratitudeleft in this world."
2.  With these words she made them all want to come, and they flocked tothe assembly till seats and standing room were alike crowded. Everyone was struck with the appearance of Ulysses, for Minerva hadbeautified him about the head and shoulders, making him look tallerand stouter than he really was, that he might impress the Phaeciansfavourably as being a very remarkable man, and might come off wellin the many trials of skill to which they would challenge him. Then,when they were got together, Alcinous spoke:
3.  The Phaeacians then began talking among themselves, and one wouldturn towards his neighbour, saying, "Bless my heart, who is it thatcan have rooted the ship in the sea just as she was getting into port?We could see the whole of her only moment ago."
4、  When Menelaus heard this he immediately told his wife and servantsto prepare a sufficient dinner from what there might be in thehouse. At this moment Eteoneus joined him, for he lived close by andhad just got up; so Menelaus told him to light the fire and cooksome meat, which he at once did. Then Menelaus went down into hisfragrant store room, not alone, but Helen went too, withMegapenthes. When he reached the place where the treasures of hishouse were kept, he selected a double cup, and told his sonMegapenthes to bring also a silver mixing-bowl. Meanwhile Helen wentto the chest where she kept the lovely dresses which she had made withher own hands, and took out one that was largest and mostbeautifully enriched with embroidery; it glittered like a star, andlay at the very bottom of the chest. Then they all came back throughthe house again till they got to Telemachus, and Menelaus said,"Telemachus, may Jove, the mighty husband of Juno, bring you safelyhome according to your desire. I will now present you with thefinest and most precious piece of plate in all my house. It is amixing-bowl of pure silver, except the rim, which is inlaid with gold,and it is the work of Vulcan. Phaedimus king of the Sidonians mademe a present of it in the course of a visit that I paid him while Iwas on my return home. I should like to give it to you."
5、  Then Arete told her maids to set a large tripod upon the fire asfast as they could, whereon they set a tripod full of bath water on toa clear fire; they threw on sticks to make it blaze, and the waterbecame hot as the flame played about the belly of the tripod.Meanwhile Arete brought a magnificent chest her own room, and insideit she packed all the beautiful presents of gold and raiment which thePhaeacians had brought. Lastly she added a cloak and a good shirt fromAlcinous, and said to Ulysses:

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  • 曲屏 08-11

      "When Circe saw me sitting there without eating, and in great grief,she came to me and said, 'Ulysses, why do you sit like that asthough you were dumb, gnawing at your own heart, and refusing bothmeat and drink? Is it that you are still suspicious? You ought notto be, for I have already sworn solemnly that I will not hurt you.'

  • 焦惠芳 08-11

      "As soon as I got down to my ship and to the sea shore I rebukedeach one of the men separately, but we could see no way out of it, forthe cows were dead already. And indeed the gods began at once toshow signs and wonders among us, for the hides of the cattle crawledabout, and the joints upon the spits began to low like cows, and themeat, whether cooked or raw, kept on making a noise just as cows do.

  • 滕某 08-11

       As she spoke she looked towards Penelope, as though wanting totell her that her dear husband was in the house, but Penelope wasunable to look in that direction and observe what was going on, forMinerva had diverted her attention; so Ulysses caught Euryclea bythe throat with his right hand and with his left drew her close tohim, and said, "Nurse, do you wish to be the ruin of me, you whonursed me at your own breast, now that after twenty years of wanderingI am at last come to my own home again? Since it has been borne inupon you by heaven to recognize me, hold your tongue, and do not say aword about it any one else in the house, for if you do I tell you- andit shall surely be- that if heaven grants me to take the lives ofthese suitors, I will not spare you, though you are my own nurse, whenI am killing the other women."

  • 张帅 08-11

      When she had said this Minerva went away to Olympus, which theysay is the everlasting home of the gods. Here no wind beats roughly,and neither rain nor snow can fall; but it abides in everlastingsunshine and in a great peacefulness of light, wherein the blessedgods are illumined for ever and ever. This was the place to whichthe goddess went when she had given instructions to the girl.

  • 金荷 08-10

    {  She did not say a word about her own wedding, for she did not liketo, but her father knew and said, "You shall have the mules, mylove, and whatever else you have a mind for. Be off with you, andthe men shall get you a good strong waggon with a body to it that willhold all your clothes."

  • 房道龄 08-09

      Then Euryalus reviled him outright and said, "I gather, then, thatyou are unskilled in any of the many sports that men generally delightin. I suppose you are one of those grasping traders that go about inships as captains or merchants, and who think of nothing but oftheir outward freights and homeward cargoes. There does not seem to bemuch of the athlete about you."}

  • 范伯登 08-09

      And Piraeus answered, "Telemachus, you may stay away as long asyou please, but I will look after him for you, and he shall find nolack of hospitality."

  • 钟孝君 08-09

      Then Minerva answered, "Sir, you have spoken well, and it will bemuch better that Telemachus should do as you have said; he, therefore,shall return with you and sleep at your house, but I must go back togive orders to my crew, and keep them in good heart. I am the onlyolder person among them; the rest are all young men of Telemachus' ownage, who have taken this voyage out of friendship; so I must return tothe ship and sleep there. Moreover to-morrow I must go to theCauconians where I have a large sum of money long owing to me. Asfor Telemachus, now that he is your guest, send him to Lacedaemon in achariot, and let one of your sons go with him. Be pleased also toprovide him with your best and fleetest horses."

  • 涂山 08-08

       "What an exquisitely delicious sleep I have been having," saidshe, as she passed her hands over her face, "in spite of all mymisery. I wish Diana would let me die so sweetly now at this verymoment, that I might no longer waste in despair for the loss of mydear husband, who possessed every kind of good quality and was themost distinguished man among the Achaeans."

  • 纪佳松 08-06

    {  And Minerva answered, "I will tell you truly and particularly allabout it. I am Mentes, son of Anchialus, and I am King of theTaphians. I have come here with my ship and crew, on a voyage to menof a foreign tongue being bound for Temesa with a cargo of iron, and Ishall bring back copper. As for my ship, it lies over yonder off theopen country away from the town, in the harbour Rheithron under thewooded mountain Neritum. Our fathers were friends before us, as oldLaertes will tell you, if you will go and ask him. They say,however, that he never comes to town now, and lives by himself inthe country, faring hardly, with an old woman to look after him andget his dinner for him, when he comes in tired from pottering abouthis vineyard. They told me your father was at home again, and that waswhy I came, but it seems the gods are still keeping him back, for heis not dead yet not on the mainland. It is more likely he is on somesea-girt island in mid ocean, or a prisoner among savages who aredetaining him against his will I am no prophet, and know very littleabout omens, but I speak as it is borne in upon me from heaven, andassure you that he will not be away much longer; for he is a man ofsuch resource that even though he were in chains of iron he would findsome means of getting home again. But tell me, and tell me true, canUlysses really have such a fine looking fellow for a son? You areindeed wonderfully like him about the head and eyes, for we were closefriends before he set sail for Troy where the flower of all theArgives went also. Since that time we have never either of us seen theother."

  • 雷凯 08-06

      "Then some malicious god conveyed Ulysses to the upland farm wherehis swineherd lives. Thither presently came also his son, returningfrom a voyage to Pylos, and the two came to the town when they hadhatched their plot for our destruction. Telemachus came first, andthen after him, accompanied by the swineherd, came Ulysses, clad inrags and leaning on a staff as though he were some miserable oldbeggar. He came so unexpectedly that none of us knew him, not even theolder ones among us, and we reviled him and threw things at him. Heendured both being struck and insulted without a word, though he wasin his own house; but when the will of Aegis-bearing Jove inspiredhim, he and Telemachus took the armour and hid it in an inner chamber,bolting the doors behind them. Then he cunningly made his wife offerhis bow and a quantity of iron to be contended for by us ill-fatedsuitors; and this was the beginning of our end, for not one of uscould string the bow- nor nearly do so. When it was about to reach thehands of Ulysses, we all of us shouted out that it should not be givenhim, no matter what he might say, but Telemachus insisted on hishaving it. When he had got it in his hands he strung it with easeand sent his arrow through the iron. Then he stood on the floor of thecloister and poured his arrows on the ground, glaring fiercely abouthim. First he killed Antinous, and then, aiming straight before him,he let fly his deadly darts and they fell thick on one another. It wasplain that some one of the gods was helping them, for they fell uponus with might and main throughout the cloisters, and there was ahideous sound of groaning as our brains were being battered in, andthe ground seethed with our blood. This, Agamemnon, is how we cameby our end, and our bodies are lying still un-cared for in the houseof Ulysses, for our friends at home do not yet know what has happened,so that they cannot lay us out and wash the black blood from ourwounds, making moan over us according to the offices due to thedeparted."

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